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Full text of "Southern Illinois University at Carbondale bulletin"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/southernillinois31sout 



outhern Illinois University 
it Carbondale 



Bulletin 



989-1991 Graduate Catalog 



SIU 




Quick Index 

University Calendar viii Financial Assistance 25 

The University 1 Tuition and Fees 

.duate Degrees Offered 10 Academic Programs 63 

Degree Requirements 13 Course Offerings 219 

Application Procedure 20 Faculty List 365 

Graduate School Phone 61^-536-7791 

SIUC complies fully with applicable federal and state nondiscrimination and 
equal opportunity laws, orders, and regulations in admission, employment, 
and access to University programs and activities. Complaints or requests forj 
further information should be directed to the Universitv Affirmative Action 
Office. Anthony Hall 104. 536-661S. 

SIUC is committed to creating and maintaining a university community free 
from all forms of sexual harassment. Copies of the '"Sexual Harassment Policy 
and Grievance Procedures" are available in the University Affirmative Action 
Office. Problems should be reported promptly to the University Ombudsman. 
Woodv Hall C302 or to the Universitv .Affirmative Action Office. Anthonv Hall 
104. 

This publication provides information about Southern Illinois University at 
Carbondale. Primary attention is given to its academic programs, rules and 
regulations, and procedures. Students will be subject to the published require- 
ments in effect when they are admitted to the Graduate School. Students 
beginning graduate work during the period of time from the start of summer 
semester 19S9 through spring semester 1991 are subject to the academic 
requirements of the Graduate School as specified in this publication. These 
requirements may be superseded by future publications of the Graduate School 
Catalog. If the requirements are subsequently changed, students may elect 
either to meet the requirements in force in their particular degree programs 
immediately prior to the change, or to meet the new requirements. If they elect 
the former option they shall be guaranteed a minimum period of time from the 
date that the program requirements were changed within which minimum 
period they will be permitted to complete the old degree requirements. 

This minimum period shall be determined by the department or other degree- 
program unit, subject to the following two constraints. First, the minimum 
period prescribed by the department may not exceed the standard Graduate 
School limitation that credit applied toward fulfillment of requirements for the 
master's degree must have been earned within a six-year period preceding the 
completion of the degree, and that doctoral students must complete degree 
requirements within five years after admission to candidacy. Second, the 
minimum period shall encompass no less than two years for master's degree 
students and three years for doctoral students, with the exception that students 
in the last stage of their degree work when requirements change ta master's 
student who has completed all requirements except the thesis or research 
report and the final examination or a doctoral student who has been admitted 
to Ph.D. candidacy) shall not be subject to the new requirements but may 
complete their degrees within the standard Graduate School limitations stated 
above. Students who elect to follow old requirements, but do not complete their 
work within the minimum period prescribed by the department, shall, unless 
they were in the last stage of their degree work when requirements changed, be 
subject to requirements in force at the time they complete their degrees, and 
shall be subject to the standard Graduate School limitations described above. 
The University reserves the right to change information contained herein on; 
matters other than curricular requirements without notice when circumstances 
warrant such action. 



SIU 



Southern 
Illinois 
University 
at Carbondale 



Bulletin 



1989-1991 

Graduate 

Catalog 



Southern Illinois University at 
Carbondale Bulletin (ISPS 506-080) 

Volume 31 Number 1 June 198 

Second-class postage paid at Carbondale, 
Illinois 62901. Published by Southern Illinois 
University at Carbondale. Carbondale, 
Illinois 62901, tour times per year, in June. 
Julv. August, and September. 
POSTMASTER Send address changes to 
Academic Publications c o University 
Electronic Communications. Southern 
Illinois University at Carbondale. 
Carbondale. 11.62901. 



This 
Catalog 



The Graduate Catalog covers in detail questions concerning the graduate 
program of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale for the period from sum- 
mer, 1989, through spring, 1991. It supersedes Volume 29, Number 1, of the 
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale Bulletin and the Graduate School 
General Information brochure dated 1985-1986. 

The following publications may be obtained free from University Electronic 
Communications, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, 
Illinois 62901. 

Graduate Catalog 

Undergraduate Catalog 

School of Law Catalog 

Schedule of Classes. Please specify term (fall, spring, or summer). 



Table of 
Contents 



Hoard of Trustees and Officers of Administration vii 

University Calendar vm 

Deans of Schools and ( 'olletfes x 

1 The Graduate School 1 

Southern Illinois University 1 

Enrollment 1 

I iocation 2 

Campus 2 

The Graduate School 1 

Office of Research Development and Administration 5 

Associations 5 

Oak Ridge Associated Universities 5 

International Business Institute b" 

International Lingages 6 

Business and Economic Development 6 

Management and Executive Development 6 

Research 6 

Institutional Development 6 

Facilities and Services 6 

Morris Library 6 

Computing Affairs 7 

Placement Services of the Career Planning and Placement Center 7 

Housing 7 

On-Campus Housing 7 

Off-Campus Housing 7 

International Programs and Services 7 

International Students and Scholars 8 

International Development 8 

Study Abroad Programs 8 

Student Health Program 9 

Disabled Student Services 9 

Women's Programs 9 

The University Ombudsman 10 

Graduate Degrees Offered 10 

Master's Degrees 10 

Specialist Degree — Spec. Ed 11 

Doctoral Degrees 12 

Student Responsibility 12 

Degree Requirements 13 

Master's Degree Program 13 

Admission 13 

General Requirements 13 

Time Limits 14 

Thesis 14 

Double Major for a Master's Degree 14 

Second Master's Degree 15 

Summary of Master's Degree Requirements 15 

Sixth- Year Specialist Degree Program 15 

Hi 



Admission 15 

General Requirements 15 

Doctoral Degree Program 16 

Admission 16 

Accelerated Entry into a Doctoral Program 16 

General Requirements 17 

Preliminary Examination 17 

Research Tool Requirement 17 

Residency 17 

Admission to Candidacy 17 

Dissertation 18 

Final Examination . 19 

Interdisciplinary Doctor of Philosophy Programs '. 19 

General Regulations and Procedures 20 

Application for Graduate Study 20 

Transcripts 20 

Test Scores 21 

Deadlines 21 

Requirements 21 

Admission of Faculty Members 21 

Admission of International Students 21 

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 22 

Academic Requirements 22 

Qualification for Assistantship with Teaching Duties 22 

Registration 22 

Graduate Mail Registration 23 

Late Registration 23 

Withdrawal from Courses and from the University 23 

Student Course Loads 24 

Continuing Enrollment Requirement 24 

School of Law Courses 25 

Financial Assistance 25 

Graduate Assistants 26 

Graduate Fellowships and Traineeships 27 

Dissertation Research Awards 27 

Graduate Dean's Fellowships 27 

Tuition Scholarships 27 

Financial Aid Office 29 

External Support for Graduate Study 29 

Faculty Appointments 30 

Satisfactory Progress for Graduate Students 30 

Purpose 30 

Authority 30 

Satisfactory Progress Standards 30 

Maximum Time to Graduate 30 

Grades 30 

Definitions 31 

Credit Hours Attempted 31 

Credit Hours Completed 31 

Eligible Students 31 

Grade Point Average (GPA) 31 

Notification of Ineligible Status 31 

Reinstatement 31 

Satisfactory Progress Probationary Period 

Appeal for Mitigating Circumstances 31 

Tuition and Fees 32 

iv 



Student ( 'enter Fee 

Student Activity Fee 

Athletic Pee 

Revenue Bond Fee 

Student Medical Benefit Fee 

Additional Fee Information 

Payment and Refund of Tuition and Fees 

I )eferment of Tuition and Fees 34 

Determination of Residency Status 

Adult Student 

Minor Student 

Parent or ( ruardian 

Emancipated Minor 

Married Student 

Persons without United States Citizenship 

Armed Forces Personnel 6 

State and Federal Penitentiary 

Minor Children of Parents Transferred Outside the United States 36 

Dependents of University Employees 36 

Definition of Terminology 

Procedure for Review of Residency Status or Tuition Assessment 

University Employees .'J7 

Faculty and Staff 37 

Civil Service 37 

Other Types of Registration in Graduate Courses 

Unclassified Students (Non-Degree) 

Regular Unclassified 38 

Late-Entry Unclassified 

Temporary Unclassified 38 

Undergraduate Student Registration in Graduate Courses 39 

Graduate Credit 39 

Undergraduate Credit 39 

Additional Information 39 

Residence-Center Credit 39 

Transfer Credit 

Graduate Grading System 10 

Student Conduct Code 41 

Academic Grievances and Procedures 57 

Graduate School Procedures for Charges of Academic 

Dishonesty Leading to Possible Rescission of Degree 59 

Retention 61 

Graduation 61 

Posthumous Degrees 62 

Release of Student Information and Issuance of Transcripts 62 

2 Academic Programs 63 

Accountancy b4 

Administration of Justice 66 

Agribusiness Economics 

Agricultural Education and Mechanization 69 

Animal Science 70 

Anthropology 71 

Art 74 

Behavior Analysis and Therapy 

Biological Sciences 

Botany 76 



Business Administration 79 

Center for the Study oi Crime, Delinquency, and Corrections 84 

Chemistry and Biochemistry 84 

Cinema and Photography 88 

Communication Disorders and Sciences 89 

Community Development 93 

Computer Science 99 

Curriculum and Instruction 100 

Economics 104 

Education 108 

Educational Administration 108 

Educational Psychology 110 

Counselor Education 112 

Engineering 113 

English 117 

English as a Foreign Language 121 

Foreign Languages and Literature 122 

Forestry 124 

Geography 126 

Geology 129 

Health Education 132 

Higher Education 133 

History 138 

Journalism 140 

Linguistics 144 

Mathematics 149 

Microbiology 153 

Mining (Coal Extraction and Utilization) Engineering 155 

Molecular Science 156 

Music 159 

Pharmacology 162 

Philosophy 170 

Physical Education 174 

Physics 174 

Physiology 175 

Plant and Soil Science 176 

Political Science 177 

Psychology 184 

Public Affairs 190 

Radio-Television 190 

Recreation 190 

Rehabilitation Institute 192 

Social Work 198 

Sociology 200 

Special Education 204 

Speech Communication 206 

Telecommunications 210 

Theater 211 

Vocational Education Studies 214 

Zoology 215 

3 Course Descriptions 219 

4 Faculty 365 

Index 395 

vi 



Board of Trustees and 
Officers of Administration 



Board of Trustees of Southern Illinois University 

Term Expires 

A. I). Van Meter, Jr., Chairman, Springfield l 

Carol Kimmel, Vice-Chair, Moline L995 

George T. Wilkins, Jr., Secretary, Edwardsville L991 

B. B. Birger, Collinsville 199 

Ivan A. Klliott, Jr., Carmi 1991 

William R. Norwood, Rolling Meadows 1995 

Harris Rowe, Jacksonville 1995 

Darrell Johnson, (Student Trustee) Carbondale 1 

Kim Blankenship, (Student Trustee) Edwardsville 1989 

Sharon Holmes, Executive Secretary of the Board of Trustees 

Officers of Central Administration, Southern Illinois University 

Lawrence K. Pettit, Chancellor 

James M. Brown, Vice-Chancellor 

Howard Webb, Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

Thomas C. Britton, Vice-Chancellor for Administration 

Donald W. Wilson, Vice-Chancellor for Financial Affairs and Board Treasurer 

C. Richard Gruny, Board Legal Counsel 
Elaine Hyden, Executive Director of Audits 

Officers of Administration, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale 

John C. Guy on, President 

Benjamin A. Shepherd, Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Research 

Clarence G. Dougherty, Vice-President for Campus Services 

Charles Hindersman, Vice-President for Financial Affairs 

Harvey Welch, Jr., Vice-President for Student Affairs 

Officers of Administration, Graduate School 

John H. Yopp, Associate Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Research 

and Dean, Graduate School 
Victoria J. Molfese, Acting Director, Research Development and 

Administration 
Patricia L. Carrell, Associate Dean, Graduate School 
Richard E. Falvo, Associate Dean. Graduate School 



r/z 



University 
Calendar 



Summer Session, 1989 

Eight-Week Session Begins Monday, June 12, 7:30 A.M. 

Deadline to Apply for 

Graduation Friday, June 16 

Deadline to Drop an Eight-Week 

Class and Receive a Refund . . . Friday, June 23 

Independence Day Holiday Tuesday, July 4 

Deadline to Drop a Class Monday, July 10 

Final Examinations Thursday and Friday, August 3-4 

Commencement Saturday, August 5 

Fall Semester, 1989 

Semester Classes Begin Monday, August 21, 8:00 A.M. 

Deadline to Apply for 

Graduation Friday, August 25 

Labor Day Holiday Monday, September 4 

Deadline to Drop a Class 

and Receive a Refund Friday, September 8 

Deadline to Drop a Class Monday, October 16 

Thanksgiving Vacation Saturday, November 18, 12:00 NOON 

—Monday, November 27, 8:00 A.M. 

Final Examinations Monday, December 11 — Friday, 

December 15 

Spring Semester, 1990 

Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 

Birthday Monday, January 15 

Semester Classes Begin Tuesday, January 16, 8:00 A.M. 

Deadline to Apply for 

Graduation Friday, January 19 

President's Day Holiday Monday, February 19 

Spring Vacation Saturday, March 10, 12:00 NOON 

—Monday, March 19, 8:00 A.M. 

Deadline to Drop a Class Monday, March 19 

Final Examinations Monday, May 7 — Friday, May 11 

Commencement Saturday and Sunday, May 12-13 



viu 



Summer Session, 1990 (Tentative) 

Eight-Week Session Begins Monday, June 1 1, 7:30 a m 

Deadline to Apply for 

Graduation Friday, June 1 5 

Deadline to Drop an Eight- Week 

('lass and Receive a Refund . . . Friday, June 22 

Independence Day Holiday Wednesday, July 4 

Deadline to Drop a ('lass Monday, July 9 

Final Examinations Thursday and Friday, August 2-3 

Commencement Saturday, August 1 

Fall Semester, 1990 (Tentative) 

Semester Classes Begin Monday, August 20, 8:00 A.M. 

Deadline to Apply for 

Graduation Friday, August 24 

Labor Day Holiday Monday, September 3 

Deadline to Drop a Class and 

Receive a Refund Friday, September 7 

Dealine to drop a class Monday, October L5 

Thanksgiving Vacation Saturday, November 17, 12:00 noon 

—Monday, November 26, 8:00 A.M. 

Final Examinations Monday, December 10— Friday, 

December 14 

Spring Semester, 1991 (Tentative) 

Semester Classes Begin Tuesday, January 14, 8:00 A.M. 

Deadline to Apply for 

Graduation Friday, January 18 

Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 

Birthday Monday, January 21 

Deadline to Drop a Class and 

Receive a Refund Friday, February 1 

President's Day Holiday Monday, February 18 

Spring Vacation Saturday, March 9, 12:00 NOON 

—Monday, March 18, 8:00 A.M. 

Deadline to Drop a Class Monday, March 18 

Final Examinations Monday, May 6 — Friday, May 10 

Commencement Saturday and Sunday, May 11-12 

Summer Session, 1991 (Tentative) 

Eight-Week Session Begins Monday, June 10, 7:30 A.M. 

Deadline to Apply for 

Graduation Friday, June 14 

Deadline to Drop an Eight-Week 

Class and Receive a Refund . . . Friday, June 21 

Independence Day Holiday Thursday, July 4 

Deadline to Drop a Class Monday, July 8 

Final Examinations Thursday and Friday. August 1-2 

Commencement Saturday, August 3 

Excused Absences for Religious Holidays. -Students absent from classes be- 
cause of required observances of major religious holidays will be excused. It is 
the student's responsibility to notify the instructor of each class that will be 
missed in advance of the absence. Students must also take the responsibility 
for making up work missed. 



IX 



Deans of Colleges 
and School 



Janus A. Tweedy, College of Agriculture, Agriculture Building 

Thomas Gutteridge, College of Business and Administration, Rehn Hall 

Keith H. Sanders, College of Communications and Fine Arts, Communications 

Building 
Donald L Beggs, College of Education, Wham Education Building 
-lull Wall Chen, College of Engineering and Technology, Technology Building 
Anthony Cuvo, {Acting), College of Human Resources, Quigley Hall 
Peter (ioplerud III, {Interim), School of Law, Lesar Law Building 
-John S. Jackson III, College of Liberal Arts, Faner Hall 
Kenneth G. Peterson, Library Affairs, Morris Library 
Richard H. Moy, School of Medicine, Wheeler Hall 
Russell R. Dutcher, College of Science, Neckers Building 
Harry Miller, College of Technical Careers, School of Technical Careers 

Building 



x 



1 



The Graduate 
School 



Southern Illinois University 



Southern Illinois University has entered its second hundred years of teaching, 
research, and service. At the outset of the 1970's, Southern Illinois University 
became a single state system with two universities: Southern Illinois Univer- 
sity at Carbondale and Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. Southern 
Illinois University at Carbondale also has a medical school campus at 
Springfield. 

Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) first operated as a two- 
year normal school but in 1907 became a four-year, degree-granting institution. 
In 1943 SIUC was transformed from a teacher-training institution into a 
university, thus giving official recognition to the area's demand for diversified 
training and service. Graduate work was instituted in 1943, with the first 
doctoral degrees granted in 1959. There has been diversification and expansion 
of graduate programs across the University through the Colleges of Agricul- 
ture, Communications and Fine Arts, Education, Business and Administration. 
Human Resources, Liberal Arts, Science, and Engineering and Technology. In 
addition to expansion of programs within the Graduate School, professional 
schools were established in medicine and law in 1969. 

In keeping with the state's master plan, the University's objective is to 
provide a comprehensive educational program meeting as many individual 
student needs as possible. While providing excellent instruction in a broad 
range of traditional programs, it also helps individual students design special 
programs when their interests are directed toward more individualized curricula. 
The University comprises a faculty and the facilities to offer general and 
professional training ranging from two-year associate degrees to doctoral 
programs, as well as certificate and nondegree programs meeting the needs of 
persons not interested in degree education. 

Enrollment 

In fall semester 1988, out of a total enrollment of 23,634, SIUC had 3.508 and 
593 registered graduate and professional students respectively. 

Location 

Carbondale is approximately 100 miles southeast of St. Louis, Missouri. Im- 
mediately south of Carbondale begins some of the most rugged and picturesque 
terrain in Illinois. Sixty miles to the south is the historic confluence of the Ohio 
and Mississippi rivers, the two forming the border of the southern tip of Little 
Egypt, the fourteen southernmost counties in Illinois. Within ten miles oi the 
campus are located two state parks and four recreational lakes and much oi 
the area is a part of the 240,000 acre Shawnee National Forest. 



2 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

c 'annum 

The Carbondale campus, comprising more than 3,290 acres, has developed a 
- acre portion with woods and a Lake as a site for its academic buildings and 
ndence halls. Ihe buildings are located in wooded tracts along two circular 
shaped campus drives, named for Lincoln and Douglas. 

The Graduate School 

The primary concerns of the Graduate School are graduate instruction and 
arch The Graduate School therefore plays an essential role in development 
of instructional and research programs, in acquisition of funds, and in pro- 
curement of facilities necessary to encourage and support research by members 
of its scholarly community. Through faculty, staff, and students the Graduate 
School makes its contribution to the public welfare of the region, state, nation, 
and international community. 

The Graduate School offers master's degrees through sixty-two programs, 
the specialist degree in three areas, and the doctoral degree through twenty- 
five programs. Graduate students pursue advanced study and research under 
the leadership of a graduate faculty of over 1000 members. In addition, the 
Schools of Law and Medicine provide graduate students with additional 
opportunities in instruction and research. The Graduate School administers 
programs in the Colleges of Agriculture, Business and Administration, Com- 
munications and Fine Arts, Education, Engineering and Technology, Human 
Resources. Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Technical Careers, and the Schools 
of Law and Medicine. 

Within these colleges and schools are departments whose distinguished 
faculty offer inspired teaching, conduct innovative research, and facilitate 
student services from admission to placement. In addition to the excellent 
arch conducted in the colleges and schools, SIUC operates a number of 
research centers, most of which have been established with the aid of outside 
funding. These centers are described below. 

The- Center of Archaeological Investigations: closely associated with the 
Department of Anthropology, the Center for Archaeological Investigations has 
h activities in the American Midwest and Southwest, Mexico, and the 
western Pacific. Funding is provided by state and federal agencies, and private 
institutions. The center also conducts archaeological research for firms and 
government agencies which are required to comply with environmental and 
antiquities laws. A collection representing 20 years of research makes it the 
largest archaeological repository in the region. The center conducts an annual 
field school, provides thesis and dissertation data, and research opportunities 
for numerous students of archaeology. 

( oal Extraction and Utilization Research Center (CEURC): the CEURC was 

iblished by the state of Illinois at SIUC in 1974 to stimulate and coordinate 

sing the coal research needs of the state and nation. Over 100 

SIUC faculty and 250 graduate students are now involved in this multi- 

iciplinary effort involving both basic and applied research. The CEURC 
itfl facult) m developing research in the following broad areas: coal 
coal conversion, coal preparation, coal utilization, mining, and reclama- 
tion. In addition, CE1 HRC is involved with the management of several research 
riented activities. Prominent among these is the SIUC Coal 
Technology Laboratory, which focuses on developing technologies for desul- 
funzing bituminous coal. CEURC also administers the Illinois Mining and 
Mineral Resourt < ft earch Institute, a research and scholarship program, 
and th' National Mine Land Reclamation Center, Midwest Region, a research 



The Graduate School The Graduate & hoot '> 

and technology transfer program that addresses regional reclamation 

In addition, (In- CEURC plays ;m important role m tin- [llinoif ( oaJ Develop 

ment Board/Center lor Research on Sulfur in Coal program a( SIU4 Tl 

activities exee<'d three million dollars in annual awards and make •> -ignite 
Contribution to SI I K "s coal research, education, and service mission 

Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory: since its founding in 1951, 

laboratory has achieved a distinguished n-cord training graduate students in 
basic and applied principles of vertebrate ecology and wildlife biology [tic the 

only such comprehensive program in Illinois, and it is recognized as among 

the premier programs in the nation. Independent, cooperative, and collar* 

five research supported by industry, foundations, and state and federal agen 

cies lead to better understanding and management of natural resources. The 

laboratory has pioneered in the reclamation and enhancement ot mined lands 
for the benefit of various resources; and, the current efforts provide Unique 
research and training opportunities. Other areas oi acknowledged laboral 

expertise include the biology and ecology of game, endangered, and nongame 

wildlife; aspects of land use and the impact on wildlife resources; avian 
physiological ecology, environmental toxicology, and the epizootiology ot 
zoonotic and other diseases in wildlife. More than 2i) projects directed by 
laboratory staff currently afford graduate fellows and research assistants 
broad and varied research opportunities. These activities exceed $500,000 each 
year in contracts and grants, resulting in significant contribution to academic 
needs of students and staff and requests for service by state, federal, and 
private agencies. 

Cooperative Fisheries Research Laboratory: graduate research in fisheries is 
conducted through the Fisheries Research Laboratory. Graduate study in 
fisheries, culminating in the Master of Science, Master of Arts, or Doctor of 
Philosophy degree, is offered in the Department of Zoology. Research activities 
include studies in both fish management and aquaculture. Emphases include 
warmwater, coolwater, and coldwater fishes native to Illinois. There are also 
opportunities to work with exotic species of fishes and shellfishes, both fresh- 
water and marine, particularly through the international program which has 
been developed in recent years. Some of the areas of research stressed are 
tropic ecology, water quality, pond culture, tank culture, polyculture. culture 
system development, nutrition, fish physiology, fish genetics, utilization oi 
nursery areas, introduction of forage fishes as a management tool, introduction 
of non-native sport fishes, ecology of larval fishes, age and growth studies. 
introduction of hybrid fish species, utilization of power plant cooling lakes, and 
population dynamics. Facilities in the Fisheries Research Laboratory include 
offices, well equipped laboratories, aquarium rooms, culture ponds, a greenhouse 
for hydroponic and recirculating water system studies, and storage buildings. 
A new 8,300 square-foot wet-laboratory building has just been completed. 

Materials Technology Center: the Materials Technology Center was estab- 
lished as a part of a high-technology thrust by the state oi Illinois for the 
purpose of promoting economic growth in the state by (1) stimulating tradi- 
tional industries to develop and utilize new materials and advanced mater, s 
technology, and (2) attracting to Illinois high-technology industries that wish 
to develop and manufacture new materials and to create new techniques for 
using materials. 

The Materials Technology Center was established in 1983 on the campus of 
SIUC as the direct result of a 1983 recommendation of the Governor's Commis- 
sion on Science and Technology of the State oi Illinois. It's function is to 
stimulate and coordinate research in the materials sciences carried out by the 
faculty of SIUC. A major goal is to use the results oi the research to support 
industrial spin-offs and hence strengthen the economic posture oi Southern 
Illinois and the region. 



4 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

The major ongoing thrust involves composite materials research: carbon 
fiber investigations which involve pitch fiber spinning, modeling, microstruc- 
tural studies and precursor research; composites fabrication which includes 
process modeling, interfacial studies and characterization; property testing 
which includes investigations into creep, fracture, delamination and tribology; 
oxidation studies and the development of protective coatings for carbon-carbon 
composites. Smaller thrust areas involve the development of amorphous coat- 
ings for corrosion resistant metal structures, and investigations into high 
performance magnetic materials. The total program of the center provides an 
opportunity for the students and staff of SIUC to participate in a research 
experience of vital importance to the local region, the state, and the nation. 

The Graduate School, as a part of SIUC, is fully accredited by the North 
Centra] Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Other accreditations 
and affiliations include: 

Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. 

Accredition Council of the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Busi- 
ness (undergraduate and master's level programs) 
American Association for Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care 
American Association of Museums (University Museum) 
American Bar Association 
American Chemical Society 

American Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication 
American Dietetic Association 
American Institute of Professional Geologists 

American Psychological Association (Counseling and Clinical Psychology) 
American Speech and Hearing Association by American Board Examiners in 

Speech Pathology and Audiology 
Association of American Law Schools 
Association of Research Libraries 

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Institutes (Evaluation Devel- 
opment Center) 
Community Development Society 

Council on Rehabilitation Education (Rehabilitation Counseling Program) 
Council on Social Work Education 
Federal Aviation Administration (Aviation Maintenance Technology, Aviation 

Flight, Avionics Technology, and the Airway Science Curriculum) 
Illinois Office of Education 

Superintendent of Education 

State Board of Education 

State Teacher Certification Board 
Liasion Committee on Medical Education of the American Medical Association 

and Association of American Medical Colleges 
National Athletic Trainers Association 
National Association of Schools of Art and Design 
National Association of Schools of Music 

National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 
National Recreation and Parks Association (National Accrediation Council) 
Society of American Foresters 
University Council for Vocational Education 
Western Association of Schools and Colleges 

Office of Research Development and Administration 

The Office of Research Development and Administration (ORDA) is the Uni- 
versity administrative unit primarily responsible for research administration 
and development. The functions of the office divide into two major categories. 



The Graduate School The Graduate School ■> 

One is concerned with activities that are funded by federal, state and lo 
governments as well as by foundations, private industry, and other exten 
funding sources. The second major category is the internal research program 

which is supported with state funds. 

The OKI )A staff" provides a number of services for faculty and Students who 

desire to submit proposal applications to funding agencies. Included are a re 
source library which contains guidelines for the various funding sources, ap 

plication forms, plus consultation and assistance in proposal and budget 
preparation. 

Research shops and services 

To further assist faculty researchers, OKDA operates nine support service 
units for their use. The Central Research Shop is a facility which designs, 
repairs, and constructs special ecjuipment. The Research Photography and 
Illustrations Unit offers consultation and technical assistance to those in need 
of scientific photography as an integral part of their research. The central 
animal facility or Vivarium is maintained under the direction of a veterinarian 
to insure proper and humane care and management of animals. The Center for 
Electron Microscopy houses two scanning and two transmission scopes, as 
well as other related equipment. The Fine Instruments Research Shop has two 
components:e/ec£nca/ and mechanical. This shop provides consultation, design, 
and fabrication of sophisticated electronic and mechanical instruments. The 
Glassblowing Research Shop provides design and fabrication of glass ap- 
paratus. The Machine Research Shop provides design and fabrication of 
materials demanding medium and large machining capabilities. The Amino 
Acid Analyzer provides amino-acid analyses of samples of both physiological 
and hydrolysate nature. The Fourier Transform-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 
{FT-NMR) facility provides NMR spectra for a number of magnetically active 
nuclei. 

Associations 

OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES 

The University is a member of the Council of Sponsoring Institutions of Oak 
Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), a not-for-profit consortium of 49 col- 
leges and universities and a management and operating contractor for the 
U.S. Department of Energy with principal offices located in Oak Ridge. 
Tennessee. Founded in 1946, ORAU identifies and helps solve problems in 
science, engineering, technology, medicine, and human resources. ORAU con- 
ducts research and educational programs in energy, health, and the environ- 
ment for DOE, ORAU's member institutions, other colleges and universities. 
and other private and governmental organizations. 

ORAU manages competitive programs to bring students at all levels, precol- 
lege through postgraduate, as well as university and other faculty members, 
into federal and private research laboratories. Recipients of fellowships and 
research grants are selected by ORAU and the facilities in which appointments 
are served, which may include Oak Ridge National Laboratory: the Atmos- 
pheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division in Oak Ridge: Savannah River 
Laboratory and Savannah River Ecology Laboratory in Aiken. South Carolina: 
the Center for Energy and Environment Research in Rio Piedras and 
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico; the Morgantown, West Virginia, and Pittsburgh. 
Pennsylvania, Energy Technology Centers; the l T .S. Bureau of Mines Pitts- 
burgh Research Center; and the National Center for Toxicologieal Research at 
Jefferson, Arkansas. 

Many programs in ORAU's Institute for Energy Analysis: Medical and 
Health Sciences Division; Manpower Education, Research, and Training Divi- 
sion; Special Projects Division; and University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge 



6 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

(UNISOR) are also open to participation by qualified students and faculty 
members. 

Of particular interest are short, specialized courses for scientists, engineers, 
educators, and students in nuclear-related fields developed and conducted by 
ORAU's professional training programs. For additional information, contact 
the Graduate School. 

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS INSTITUTE 

The College of Business and Administration's International Business Insti- 
tute's primary objective is to promote world-wide excellence in education, 
research, and service in the arena of international business. Working to meet 
this goal, the institute strives to increase our awareness of the global environ- 
ment of business and to promote greater expertise in managing that environ- 
ment through the following activities. 

International Linkages. Provides technical assistance, workshops, and con- 
ferences to assist Illinois businesses with their international development and 
export efforts, and assisting overseas firms seeking to expand their commercial 
relationship with Illinois businesses. 

Business and Economic Development. Provides management training and 
executive development seminars on current business and managerial topics for 
managers in Illinois and in countries throughout the world. 

Management and Executive Development. Provides management training and 
executive development seminars on current business and managerial topics for 
managers in Illinois and in countries throughout the world. 

Research. Provides support for and facilitating research, domestically and 
abroad, on current problems in all areas of international business, with special 
emphasis on creative, realistic solutions to modern business problems. 

Institutional Development. Provides technical assistance to overseas academic 
institutions in the development of curriculum and course materials, the train- 
ing of faculty, and consulting with administrators. 

Facilities and Services 

Morris Library 

Morris Library contains over 2,000,000 volumes and subscribes to nearly 
14,300 current serials. In addition the library has an extensive collection of 
maps, manuscripts, rare books, government documents, phonograph records, 
and about 2,400,000 units of microform materials. The collection is arranged 
into four subject divisions (education/psychology, humanities, science, and 
social studies) as well as a separate Undergraduate Library. Special Collections 
consists of rare books, historical archives, and University archives. Among the 
many materials are important research collections in American and British 
expatriate literature, twentieth century philosophy, proletariat theatre, the 
Irish literary renaissance, and press freedom. Morris Library serves as a 
depository of federal, state, and U.N. documents. A major source for research 
in the behavioral and social sciences is the Human Relations Area files, 
consisting of copies of documents, books, articles, and manuscripts covering 
many world cultures. Supplementing the resources of Morris Library is the 
Center for Research Libraries (Chicago), in which the University holds mem- 
bership. Morris Library is a member of the Illinois Library Computer System 



The Graduate School Facilities and Sen ices / 7 

(LCS), a state-wide automated circulation system which is being developed as 
the library's on-line catalog. A computer-based interlibrary loan system serves 
to identify material in other libraries and to transmit requests for items. On- 
line computer-based bibliographic search capabilities using hundreds of data 
bases are available. Students and faculty may use and borrow library 
materials from the other state-supported universities in Illinois. A wide range 
of instructional development, research, and evaluation services, video, pho- 
tographic and graphic production films and video materials, and related 
equipment is provided by Learning Resources Service. A separately housed law 
library may be used by the University community as well. 

Computing Affairs 

Computing Affairs operates a general purpose computing facility which pro- 
vides related computer services and support to the University academic, 
research, and administrative communities. The academic and research needs 
of faculty and students are supported through a wide variety of systems, 
programming languages, and software packages; through on-line information 
and staff support pertinent to access procedures, operating guidelines, tech- 
nical assistance, and documentation; and through a program of periodic 
noncredit instruction in computing topics. 

Facilities available include an IBM 3081-GX running VM/CMS and 
an IBM 3090-150E with vector processor running MVS. These systems have 
access to 48 and 64 megs of memory, 40 billion bytes on on-line disk, four tape 
reel units, six tape cartridge units, 4,000 line per minute print capacity, three 20 
page per minute laser printers, and SNA 3270 communications network with 
over 1400 interactive devices, BITNET and NSFNet connections, and a 
campus area network based upon fiber optics in Phase I status. Special 
features of the computer learning centers are instructional laboratories 
equipped with 120 full screen terminals, 140 microcomputers and associated 
peripherals. 

Placement Services of the University Placement Center 

The University Placement Services assists students and alumni seeking career 
employment. Maximum benefit from the services is assured for students who 
file their resumes approximately one semester prior to graduation. Alumni 
should periodically update their resumes which are placed on file for ten years. 
All inquiries concerning this service should be made to the University Place- 
ment Center office. 

Housing 

On-Campus Housing. Double occupancy housing is available in residence 
halls for single graduate students. All contracts will be for room and board. 

University-owned housing for married students includes 304 unfurnished 
twoor three-bedroom air-conditioned apartments and 272 furnished efficiency 
oneor two-bedroom air-conditioned apartments. Because the demand for uni- 
versity housing for married students exceeds the supply, information should be 
requested early from University Family Housing, Building B, Washington 
Square. 

Off-Campus Housing. The Off-Campus Housing Office, Building B. Wash- 
ington Square, maintains current information on off-campus rooms, 
apartments, houses for rent, or for sale, and trailer parks. Experience has 
shown that satisfactory arrangements cannot be made by mail. A personal 
visit is usually required. Prices vary widely, ranging from $90 a month for 
trailer spaces to $350 a month or more for houses and apartments. All 
arrangements for off-campus housing and all business transactions in the 



8 ( tetelog Chapter 1 

matter oi this typo of housing are the sole responsibility of the student and the 
ner of the facility. 

International Programs and Services 

International Programs and Services is an administrative unit within aca- 
demic affairs and reports to the associate vice president for academic affairs 
and research services. The unit is composed of three divisions: International 
Students and Scholars. International Development, and Study Abroad Pro- 
grams. Community Programs, which represents the local, regional, and state 
outreach effort o( the University in international affairs, is an important 
subdivision of the International Students and Scholars division. 

International Students and Scholars 

The International Students and Scholars division provides comprehensive 
programs and services for international students and scholars from pre-arrival 
correspondence to post-graduate concerns. These programs and services in- 
clude processing of financial clearance for admission, serving as liaison with 
foreign governments and sponsoring agencies, providing certification for for- 
eign currency exchange, and other needs. This office has been designated by 
the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) as having the official 
responsibility for interpretation and adherence to INS laws and regulations as 
they apply to non-immigrant students and faculty. Also designated responsible 
officers administer proper compliance with the USIA Exchange Visitor Pro- 
gram for the University. Assistance with INS regulations, forms, and proce- 
dures is provided to all non-immigrants related to University and broader 
community affairs. 

Integral educative services include orientation programs, arrival and hous- 
ing assistance, personal counseling and referral, a Handbook for International 
Students and Faeulty. a newsletter (The International Dateline), advisement of 
international student associations, and a preparation for going home seminar. 

Special programs which promote an international dimension of cross-cultural 
exchange to the broader community are provided. An annual International 
Festival and various national day celebrations are held. The Community 
Programs subdivision in cooperation with the International Friends Club 
coordinates a Host Family Program, International Speakers' Bureau, English 
in Action. Language Exchange, American and International Cooking Ex- 
change, an International Spouses Group, and a Loan Closet. 

The International Students and Scholars division is located at 910 S. Forest 
(618 74). 

International Development 

The International Development division provides University-wide leadership, 
coordination, and support for a wide variety of developmental activities. These 
activities include research and dissemination of information, an international 
urc<- library, grants and projects, inter-institutional linkages, international 
visitors and protocol, and public relations. Other developmental activities such 
nternational student recruitment and alumni are carried out in cooperation 
with Admissions and Records and Alumni Servio - 

Assistance is provided in the exploration of ideas, identification of funding 
sources, proposal development, contract negotiations, campus coordination 
and follow-up activity 

The International Development division is located at 803 S. Oakland (618- 
74X 

Study Abroad Programs 

The Study Abroad division coordinates services for American students and 



The Graduate School Fat ilitie i and Sen 

faculty, including international grant programs, exchanges and 
programs. It is the central referral point for information on th< 
faculty Fulbright programs and on the British Marshall, Internatioi 
search and Exchanges Board (IREX), Belgian-American Educational A 
ation, and Rhodes scholarships. Graduate students maj also participate in 
inter-university international exchange programs and in I 
grams offered during the summer and intercession periods under th< 

of this division. 

The Study Abroad Programs division is located .it - S Oakland 
153-5774). 

Student Health Program 

The Student Medical Benefit (SMB) fee provides funding for an extent 

health program. On-campuS services include the wellness programs, out patient 

care, laboratory services, x-rays, a pharmacy, emergency dental services, and a 
sports medicine program. Off-campus benefits include emergency sen 

hospitalization, specialty care, and out-of-area benefits. 
The Student Health Program is located in Beimfohrand Kesnar Halls and is 

open 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 P.M. Monday through Friday. Students in need of 
emergency care when the Health Service is closed, should call the Dial-A-N 
program, 536-5585 for health care advice or help in deciding whether you need 

to go to the Memorial Hospital of Carbondale emergency room. It an am- 
bulance is required, students should call the Jackson County Ambulance Serv- 
ice at 618-684-5678. 

Students who carry their own medical insurance or are covered under then- 
parents' policy may be eligible for a refund of portions of the student medical 
benefit fee. Refunds of the fee are made on the basis of comparable or duplicate 
coverage for each area of service. Students who think they may qualify f< 
refund may apply no later than the end of the third week of each semester by 
contacting the administration office — insurance section of the Student Health 
Program. When applying, students should provide a copy of their insurance 
policy. 

Optional coverages are also available for dependents and excess supple- 
mental coverage. Details and prices for these policies are available and must 
be purchased in the first three weeks of the semester. Information is available 
from the Student Health Program Insurance office. Room 118 of Kesnar Hall. 
Small Group Housing (618-453-3311). 

Disabled Student Services 

The University maintains a commitment to make all services, programs, and 
facilities available to students with disabilities. Numerous services are 
provided to disabled students through the Disabled Student Services office and 
other departments in order that this student population may obtain the 
maximum academic, social, and cultural benefits within the University 
community. Services and programs include preadmission planning, orienta- 
tion, adapted van transportation, wheelchair repair, attendant recruitment and 
referral, adapted recreation, interpreters and note takers for hearing impaired 
students, specialized materials and equipment for visually handicapped 
students, reader and tutor recruitment and referral, proctoring academic 
examinations, consultation with faculty, accessible housing referral, special 
parking, and liaison with agencies such as the Illinois Department oi 
Rehabilitation Services. The campus is quite accessible and usable by students 
using wheelchairs, visually impaired, hearing impaired, learning disabled, and 
other permanently disabled students. The University Housing office also 
provides modified housing facilities in the Thompson Point Residence Halls 



10 Graduate Catai Chapter 1 

and in the family housing areas. Prospective and newly admitted students 
should OOntad Disabled Student Services tor information. 

women's Services 

Women's Services, a component of the Counseling Center, is designed to meet 
the special seeds of women from the University and the surrounding com- 
munity. Staff members are available to provide information and support for 
women making educational, vocational, and personal decisions. Some of the 
- "vices provided by Women's Services include resource and referral informa- 
tion, outreach workshops, seminars by request, and support and therapy 
groups lor women. A newsletter is published several times throughout the 
semester which focuses on specific issues of interest to women living in today's 
changing world. In addition, a library is available which contains books, 
journals, and periodicals on topics that may assist individuals in their research 
and or personal growth. Short term counseling is also available to the in- 
dividual in need of support and assistance. 

The Re-Entry program provides special supportive services to women return- 
ing to the University or beginning college for the first time after a period in the 
work force or at home. Women's Services aids in her transition to the Univer- 
sity environment by offering information on child care, housing, financial aid, 
and other issues of concern to the returning student. Support groups and social 
activities are also made available to facilitate the student's success and growth 
in school. 

Women's Services also houses the office of the Campus Safety Representa- 
tive. Responsibility is assumed for the coordination and monitoring of the 
Night Safety Vans, Women's Transit System, the Brightway Path, and the 
women's self defense classes as part of campus safety and rape prevention 
activities. Prevention education is available for individuals, residence halls, 
classes, and groups upon request. 

Women's Services is located in B-244 Woody Hall, (618-453-3655). Walk-ins 
are always welcome. 

The University Ombudsman 

The University Ombudsman is an independent and impartial University 
agency directly responsible to the president. The mission of the University 
Ombudsman is to assist members of the campus community to resolve ques- 
tions respecting their rights. Students, faculty, administrative/professional, 
and civil service staff are encouraged to contact the University Ombudsman 
office for assistance when experiencing difficulties as a result of adverse ad- 
ministrative decisions, conflicts with others, or confusion about University 
rules and procedures. Located in Woody Hall, the office maintains up-to-date 
information files on University policies and procedures. All contacts made are 
confidential. 

The University Ombudsman office solves a broad range of problems and 
conflicts. Even the most serious controversies can often be resolved through 
mediation. The basic work of the office also generates information serving to 
identify recurring problem areas or emerging ones. These may result from 
changes in 1 fniversity policies and procedures, internal adjustments, consolida- 
tion.^, or responses to changing needs. They may also result from exogenous 
shocks such as changes in financial aid, enrollment, demographics, or other 
Stresses. The University Ombudsman reports to the president and adminis- 
trators regarding this knowledge, both regularly and irregularly, in the interest 
of the efficient functioning of the University (618-453-2411). 



The Graduate School 



Facilities und Sen if e$ 1 1 



Graduate Degrees Offered 



The Graduate School offers the master's, Master of Pine Art- ipeciaHet, 
Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Rehabilitation, and Doctor of Musirn 

ministration degrees. In several of the programs lister] below, one or more 

concentrations are available. 

Master's Degrees 

Master's decrees are available in the approved programs listed below: 

Abbreviations: Master of Accountancy, M.Acc.J Master of Arts, MA. M 
of Business Administration, M.B.A.; Master of Music, M.M.; Master of Public 
Affairs, M.P.A.; Master of Science, M.S.; Master of Science m Education, M S 
Master of Social Work, M.S.W. 

Accountancy M.Acc. 

Information Systems 

Taxation 

Administration of Justice M.S. 

Agribusiness Economics M.S. 

Agribusiness Economics 

Agricultural Services 
Agricultural Education and 

Mechanization M.S. 

Agricultural Education 

Agricultural Information 

Agricultural Mechanization 

Animal Science M.S. 

Anthropology M.A. 

Conservation Archaeology 

Applied Linguistics M.A. 

Behavior Analvsis and 

Therapy M.A., M.S. 

Biological Sciences M.S. 

Botany M.A., M.S. 

Business Administration M.B.A. 

Information Systems 

International Business 

Chemistry M.S. 

Communication Disorders and 

Sciences M.S. 

Community Development M.S. 

Computer Science M.S. 

Curriculum and Instruction .... M.S.Ed. 

Economics M.A., M.S. 

Educational Administration .... M.S.Ed. 

Adult Education 

Educational Administration 

Instructional Supervision 
Educational Psychology M.S.Ed. 

Counselor Education 

Educational Psychology 
Engineering M.S. 

Civil Engineering and Mechanics 

Electrical Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering and 
Energy Processes 
English M.A. 

Composition 
English as a Foreign Language .... M.A. 
Foreign Languages and 

Literatures M.A. 

French 

German 

Spanish 
Forestry M.S. 



Forest Resource Management 

Outdoor Recreation Resource 
Management 

Wood Science and Technology 
Geography MAMS 

Physical Environmental Systems 

Resource Management Systems 

Urban and Regional Planning 

Geology M.S. 

Health Education M.S.Ed 

Community Health Education 

Industrial Health 

Safety Education 

School Health Education 
Higher Education M.S.Ed. 

Academic Administration 

College Student Personnel 

Community and Junior College 
Teaching 

Fiscal Affairs Administration 
History MA. 

American 

European 

Latin American 

Journalism M.A.. MS 

Manufacturing Systems MS 

Mathematics M.A.. MS 

Microbiology M.A 

Mining Engineering MS 

Music M.M 

Music History and Literature 

Music Theory and Composition 

Opera-Music Theater 

Performance 

Piano Education Arts 

Pharmacologv M.S. 

Philosophy M.A. 

Physical Education M.S.Ed. 

Applied Physical Education 

Experimental Physical Education 

Professional Phvsical Education 

Physics M.A.. MS 

Physiology M.S. 

Plant and Soil Science MS 

Crop Science 

Horticultural Science 

Soil Science 

Political Science M.A. 

Psychology M.A.. M.S. 

Clinical 

Counseling 



12 Graduate Catalog 

Experimental 

Public Affaire M.P.A. 

Recreation M.S.Ed. 

Administration of Recreation and 

Park Systems 

Recreation Resources Administration 
Therapeutic Recreation 
Rehabilitation Administration and 

Services M.A., M.S. 

Vdjustmenl Services 
Job Development and Placement 



Chapter 1 

Rehabilitation Administration 

Vocational Evaluation 
Rehabilitation Counseling .... M.A., M.S. 

Alcohol Specialist 

Social Work M.S.W. 

Sociology M.A. 

Special Education M.S.Ed. 

Speech Communication M.A., M.S. 

Statistics M.S. 

Telecommunications M.A. 

Vocational Education Studies . . M.S.Ed. 
Zoology M.A., M.S. 



Master of Fine Arts Degrees 

Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) degree programs are available in the fields listed 
below. 



Art 



Theater 



Cinema and Photography 
Specialist Degree 

Specialist degree programs are available in the fields listed below. 

Curriculum and Instruction Educational Psychology 

Educational Administration 

Doctoral Degrees 

Doctor of Philosophy degree programs are available in the fields listed below 
along with the approved concentrations. 



Anthropology 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Communication Disorders and Sciences 

Economics 

Education 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Educational Administration 

Educational Psychology 

Health Education 

Higher Education 

Physical Education 

Special Education 

Vocational Education Studies 
Engineering Science 
English 
Geography 

Physical Environmental Systems 



Resource Management Systems 
Geology 

Historical Studies 
Journalism 
Mathematics 
Microbiology 
Molecular Science 
Pharmacology 
Philosophy 
Physiology 
Political Science 
Psychology 

Experimental 

Clinical 

Counseling 
Sociology 

Speech Communication 
Zoology 



The Doctor of Rehabilitation degree is offered in rehabilitation. 
The Doctor of Business Administration degree is offered in the area of busi- 
ness administration. 



Student Responsibility 



Students are responsible for knowing degree requirements and enrolling in 
courses that will enable them to complete their degree programs. It is also their 
responsibility to know the University regulations for the standard of work 
required to continue in the Graduate School. For information, consult both the 
general and specific degree requirements enclosed in this publication. Addi- 
tional details about requirements and procedures are available from your 
graduate adviser or the Graduate School. 



The Graduate School Student Re \pon \ibilil . 13 



Degree Requirements 

The following section describes Graduate School regualtions unique to the 

master's, the specialist, and the doctoral degrees. For Graduate School \>r<> 

Cedures and regulations applicable to all graduate students, regardless of 
degree program, the students should consult the section titled General Regula 
tions and Procedures. For information about specific degree programs, the Stu- 
dent should consult the departmental degree program description. 

MASTKR'S DhXiKKE PROGRAM 

Requirements and admission policies for applicants to a master \> degree pro 
gram are elaborated in the following paragraphs. 

Admission 

In order to be admitted to a degree program, an applicant must meet Graduate 

School admission requirements and be approved by the department or deg 
program concerned. 

The Graduate School requires that the applicant hold a bachelor's degree 
from an accredited institution or have completed all undergraduate degree 
requirements prior to the beginning of the classes for the term for which 
admission is sought. The applicant must have earned a grade point average 
(GPA) of 2.70 or better (A = 4.00) on all undergraduate work completed prior to 
receipt of the bachelor's degree. Applicants to master's degree level study may 
begin the admissions process when they need no more than 32 semester hours 
beyond the credit shown on their transcript at the time of application t<> 
complete all requirements for the bachelor's degree. 

An applicant who is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident and whose GPA is 
below 2.70 may be admitted as an unclassified student and may later apply to 
a degree program when 12 or more semester hours of graduate work at SIU( ' 
have been completed. A minimum GPA of 3.00 is required in courses for which 
grades of A, B, C, D, F have been assigned. 

Any applicant who has completed 12 or more semester hours of graduate 
work at an accredited U.S. education institution, and who has a GPA of 3.00 in- 
better on all graduate work, may be exempted from the 2.7 undergraduate 
grade point average requirement. 

Any student with fewer than 12 hours of graduate work may be admitted to 
the Graduate School on the basis of undergraduate GPA only. 

General Requirements 

Graduate credit earned in graduate courses for which the student has received 
grades of A, B, C, or S, and only such credit, is acceptable for master's degree 
programs. At least 21 semester hours of graduate credit with grades oi A. B. or 
C must be earned in courses graded A through F. An overall grade point 
average of at least 3.00 in all graduate work included in the master's degree 
program is required before that degree can be awarded. 

The Graduate School requires a minimum of 30 semester hours oi acceptable 
graduate credit for the master's degree. Since certain degree programs require 
more than 30 hours, the student should consult the description oi the appropri- 
ate program for specific requirements. No more than half of the credit applied 
toward fulfillment of the master's degree requirements may be earned at other 
universities and transferred to SIUC. 

At least nine hours of course work must be earned in courses taught on the 
Carbondale campus or in an approved residency center. After admission to the 



14 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

degree program recommending the awarding of the degree at least nine hours 
of credit must be earned. 

In addition, B minimum of fifteen hours in courses numbered 500 or above 
must be earned at SIUC. 

Candidates for B master's degree are required to pass a comprehensive ex- 
amination covering all of their graduate work, including the thesis. This exam- 
ination may be written or oral, or both, as determined by the student's 
advisory committee. 

Time Limits 

Only credit earned within a six-year period preceding completion of require- 
ments for the degree, whether at SIUC or elsewhere, will be counted toward the 
degree. All students must remain registered until completion of their degree. 
See section Continuing Enrollment Requirement. 

Thesis 

Each candidate for a master's degree shall write a thesis except where a 
graduate program has been approved to provide some other arrangement, such 
as a research paper. The thesis shall be supervised by a committee of at least 
three members of the graduate faculty and may be counted for not more than 
six nor less than three semester hours of credit. 

Students who have completed all course work and have registered for the 
minimum number of thesis or research hours required for the degree are 
subject to the continuing registration requirement described in the section 
titled General Regulations and Procedures. 

Two copies of the approved thesis must be presented to the Graduate School 
at least three weeks prior to the date of graduation, to be bound and shelved in 
the library. For nonthesis programs, a research paper should show evidence of 
the student's knowledge of research techniques and should be based on a 
special project or specific courses as may be recommended by the advisory 
committee. One copy of the research paper must be filed in the Graduate 
School at least three weeks prior to the date of graduation. 

Double Major for a Master's Degree 

A student may earn a double major for a master's degree if such a program of 
graduate study is commensurate with the student's vocational and professional 
goals. 

A student interested in pursuing a double major for a master's degree must 
submit to the graduate dean a written statement of justification for the 
proposed program and a program of study endorsed by the chairman of both 
of the cooperating units. The forms for submitting a double major program of 
study are available in the Graduate School office. 

Requirements. 

1. The student must have been admitted to one master's degree program. 

2. Each unit in which the student wishes to earn a major must have an 
approved master's degree program. 

3. The chairman of each unit must endorse the proposed program. 

4. The proposed program must specify the title of the degree which is to be 
awarded. 

5. The proposed program must be approved by the graduate dean. 

6. At least 18 semester hours must be earned for each major, and one-half of 
the required course work for each major must be in courses numbered 500 
or above. 

7. The minimum number of hours required for the double major must total 60 
per cent of the sum of the total required for the two majors individually. 



77/r Graduate School Degree Requirement 

8. The thesis may be counted for not more than b combined total oi ( > 1101 
than 3 semester hours of credit. 

Second Master's Degree 

A student may cam a second master's degree if the second degree is off< 
academic unit different from that of the first master's degree. None "f the ho 

used towards any previous degree will he allowed to count as 8 part >>\ the ' 

number of hours toward a second master's, and all regulations shall apply to the 

second master's decree exactly as they would if this were a first master - def 
Summary of Master's Degree Requirements 

At least 30 hours of graduate credit, or the minimum number of hours require* 

the specific degree program. 

Grade point average of at least 3.00. 

At least If) hours in courses numbered 500 or a hove, which must be completed ;it 
SIUC. 

At least 9 hours after admission to the degree program. 

At least 21 hours of graduate course work graded A, H. or ('. 

At least one-half of the required number of hours earned at SIU( '. 

Courses to be applied to the degree taken within six years of conferring the 
degree. 

Transfer credit taken at another institution or as an unclassified student 
approved by the dean of the Graduate School. 

Two copies of an approved thesis or one copy of an approved research paper 
turned in to the Graduate School (not applicable for M.B.A. program). 

Comprehensive or oral examination. 

Submission of departmental clearance form. 

Register for 601 Continuing Enrollment. 

SIXTH-YEAR SPECIALIST DEGREE PROGRAM 

The sixth-year specialist degree program is for qualified students who wish to 
pursue a specialization in an educational field. The student must hold a master's 
degree or its equivalent as determined by the specific department. Sixth-year 
courses of study are offered in the professional education areas of curriculum anil 
instruction, educational administration, and educational psychology. 

Admission 

Students seeking admission to the sixth-year specialist degree program follow the 
same procedures that apply for admission to other graduate programs. Admis- 
sion to the sixth-year specialist degree program requires a grade point average oi 
3.25 {A = 4.00) for all previous graduate work. Faculty of a degree program-unit 
may add its own grade point average requirements (above the Graduate School 
minima) for admission to that particular program. The students previous work 
shall have provided a proper base of general and special preparation for the 
sixth-year studies; if this is lacking, additional work must be taken to establish 
this base. Two years of experience relevant to the specialized field are required. 

General Requirements 

A minimum of 30 semester hours of work beyond the master's degree or its 
equivalent must be completed with a minimum grade point average of 3.25. An 
advisory committee of three members for each candidate shall be appointed by 
the dean of the Graduate School upon the recommendation of the chairman of the 
respective department. The student's work must be planned early by the student 
with the advisory committee and must clearly lead toward the specialization 
sought. No more than 15 hours earned for work done on campus at another 



16 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

university (for this purpose Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville is 
considered to he another university) or in extension from SIUC, or any 
combination of the two, may be counted toward the degree. 

A field study is required of each candidate for the specialist degree. A written 
report oi the field study is to be submitted to the student's advisory committee 
before a final oral examination. After the advisory committee approves the field 
study report, one copy will be forwarded to the Graduate School to be placed in 
Morris Library. 

All credit must have been earned within seven years prior to completion of the 
program. All students must remain registered until completion of their degree. 
See section Continuing Enrollment Requirement. 

The residency requirement is fulfilled by enrollment for at least eight semester 
hours in a single semester or at least six semester hours in each of two terms 
(semesters or summer session of at least eight weeks duration). Credit earned in 
an educational specialist's degree program may, upon the approval of the 
student's doctoral committee and college, count toward a Ph.D. degree in educa- 
tion but it can not be considered as part of the residency requirement. 

It should be noted that the admissions process is slightly different for 
unclassified (nondegree) and international students and such students should 
note the paragraphs at the end of this section. 

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAM 

All Graduate School requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree also apply 
to other doctoral degree programs under the jurisdiction of the Graduate School. 

Admission 

Admission to a doctoral program in the Graduate School normally requires a 
master's degree or its equivalent, a grade point average in graduate work of at least 
3.25, and acceptance by the academic unit offering the doctoral program. Faculty 
of a degree program-unit may add its own grade point average requirements 
(above the Graduate School minima) for admission to that particular program. 
Direct post-baccalaureate degree entry is possible upon recommendation of the 
department and acceptance by the Graduate School. An applicant to doctoral 
level study may begin the admission process when the applicant needs no more 
than 1 6 additional semester hours (24 quarter hours) beyond the credits shown on 
the transcript at the time of application to complete all requirements for the 
master's degree. The graduate dean informs each student of any conditions for 
admission imposed by the Graduate School or by the academic unit. 

Accelerated Entry into a Doctoral Program 

Applicants with exceptional research potential or outstanding academic prepara- 
tion may have the option to enter a doctoral program after one semester as a mas- 
ter's level student. Not all departments participate in the accelerated entry option; 
there, the interested applicant should contact the appropriate department. 

The student initially must be admitted into a master's level program. After at 
least one semester and evidence that the applicant is prepared to begin research 
at the doctoral level and meets other departmental criteria for accelerated entry, 
the department may recommend admission directly into the doctoral program. 
The student must also meet the doctoral admission requirements including the 
minimum 3.25 grade point average for all graduate work. 

It should be noted that course work to be applied toward residency does not 
begin until after admission into the doctoral program. 

General Requirements 

The doctoral degree is awarded for high accomplishment in a particular discipline 



the Gradudte School Degree Requirement 17 

or;i recognized interdisciplinary area, a§ measured hv i he si udent ■, ainhr . to pa-~ 
the preliminary examination for admission to candidacy meet the resean h 
quirement of the program, perform a piece of original research, present the 
in proper form in a dissertation, and defend the dissertation before 8 faculty 
committee. Except for the hours required to meet residency, there i- no ( h 
School requirement that a certain number of semester hours betaken for the d 
torate although some degree programs do require a certain number ol seme 

hours. Graduate work completed at another institution may be eligible for 
transfer to the student's doctoral program, subject to( irnduate School regulate 
regarding transfer of credit and acceptance by the student s major department 
No doctoral level residence-credit program may he established off campufi 
although course work involved in a doctoral program may he taken at an off 
campus residence center provided that the full, normal requirement ol residence 
on campus at SIUC is met under the usual Graduate School standards tor 
doctoral programs. 

Preliminary Examination 

The student will generally prepare for this examination through Independent 
study and course work, as advised by the faculty of the doctoral program. The 
examination is given to determine the breadth and depth of the student's 
knowledge within the discipline. The particular form and content of the examina- 
tion are determined by the faculty of each of the doctoral programs. The student 
will be permitted to take the preliminary examination at the discretion of the 
department, after having completed two years of full-time study or its equivalent 
beyond the baccalaureate. 

Research Tool Requirement 

The doctorate at SIUC is a research-oriented degree. The research tool require- 
ment is intended to be an integral part of the student's program. Since research 
materials, problems, and techniques vary from discipline to discipline, the details 
)f the research tool requirement are determined by the faculty of each of the 
doctoral programs. 

Residency 

The residency requirement for the doctorate must be fulfilled after admission to 
the doctoral program and before formal admission to doctoral candidacy. The 
residency requirement is satisfied by completion of 24 semester hours of graduate 
credit on campus as a doctoral student within a period not to exceed four calendar 
years. No more than six hours of deferred dissertation credit may be applied 
toward fulfillment of the 24 semester hours residency requirement. No doctoral 
student will be permitted to sign up for more than six hours of dissertation until 
candidacy has been achieved. Any dissertation hours registered for above the six 
permitted prior to candidacy will not be counted toward completion of the doctoral 
degree. Credit earned in concentrated courses or workshops may apply toward 
fulfillment of the residency requirements if the student is concurrently registered 
for a course spanning the full term. No more than six semester hours ot short 
course or workshop credit may be applied to the 24 semester hours residency 
requirement. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Admission to candidacy is granted by the dean of the Graduate School upon 
recommendation of the faculty responsible for the student's program, after the 
student has fulfilled the residency requirement for the doctoral degree, passed the 
preliminary examination, and met the research tool requirement of the program. 
The doctoral degree may not be conferred less than six months after admission to 
candidacy, except upon approval of the dean of the Graduate School. The candi- 



IS Graduate Catalog Chapter 1\ 

date must fulfill all requirements for the degree within a five-year period afteri 
admission to candidacy. If completion of requirements is delayed beyond five) 
years, a student may be required to take another preliminary examination and be 
admitted to candidacy a second time. All candidates must remain registered until 
completion of their degree. See section Continuing Enrollment Requirement. 

Dissertation 

After being admitted to candidacy, the student must complete a dissertation 
showing that the student is capable of independent research or other creative 
effort. The dissertation shall be supervised by a faculty committee which has 
been approved by the dean of the Graduate School. Unless the graduate dean has 
approved an exception requested by the student's academic unit this committee 
shall consist of five graduate faculty members, at least one of whom shall be from 
a graduate program outside the student's academic unit. The student's academic 
unit shall be understood to mean the department (or equivalent units) and any 
member outside the department is eligible to serve as the outside member 
providing that the department and the graduate dean agree. 

While working on the dissertation, the student must register for the course 
numbered 600. The student is to devote at least one academic year of full-time 
work to complete the dissertation and will register for 24 semester hours of 
dissertation credit, for example, 12 hours for each of two terms. 

Students who have registered for 24 semester hours of dissertation credit and 
have not completed the doctoral dissertation are subject to the continuing enroll- 
ment requirement described in the section titled General Regulations and 
Procedures. 

Publication of the doctoral dissertation to insure its availability to the scholarly 
community is considered an integral part of the process of doctoral education. 
Students are encouraged to have their dissertations microfilmed by University 
Microfilms. Alternate methods of publication may be approved by the graduate 
dean if the dissertation is to be published within a reasonable period of time. Such 
publication must be in a relatively permanent form, without substantial altera- 
tions, and be available to the scholarly community. In either case, an abstract of 
the dissertation will be published in Dissertation Abstracts International. 

The student must submit two copies of the dissertation acceptable to the 
Graduate School, along with an abstract of 350 words or less. Unless prior 
approval is granted for another form of publication, all dissertations will be 
microfilmed. There is a fee of $55.00 to cover the cost of publication of the abstract 
and microfilming of the dissertation. If an alternate form of publication has been 
approved the fee is $45.00 to cover the cost of publication of the abstract. If 
copyright is desired, an additional fee of $25.00 will be required. The microfilming 
agreement form and the survey form of earned doctorates are completed in the 
office of the Graduate School at the time the dissertation is submitted. 

The abstract will be published in the current Dissertation Abstracts Interna- 
tional and the dissertation will be cited in American Doctoral Dissertations and 
Comprehensive Dissertation Index. A copy of the microfilmed dissertation will be 
placed in the Library of Congress archives. This service assures the student that 
the dissertation will be available to other researchers at no further personal 
expense to the student. 

If the student elects to use the copyright service, copyright will be obtained in 
the student's name. Publication rights, other than for reproduction in microform 
or from microform, are the student's to assign to any publisher at any time. In 
addition, arrangements can sometimes be made for University Microfilms to 
publish a small edition of the dissertation. 

Final Examination 

There will be a final oral examination administered by the student's doctoral 



The Gradudte School Degree Requirement IS 

dissertation committee. The examination will cover the subject of the di Lion 

and other matters related to the discipline. Any member oj the graduate faculty 
may attend the final oral examination and may participate m questioning B 

discussion, subject to reasonable limitations imposed by the chairperson oi the 
committee, hut only members of the committee may vote or make recommen 
lions concerning acceptance of the dissertation and final examination. A stud 
will be recommended for the degree only if the members of the committee, w if I 

most one exception, judge both the dissertation and the performance at the final 
oral examination to be satisfactory. In cases where a committee of more than 
members has been approved, the requirement of not more than one negative 
will still apply. 

Interdisciplinary Doctor of Philosophy Programs 

These guidelines provide for interdisciplinary doctoral programs for a limited 
number of students whose educational requirements can be met by existing 
resources, but not exclusively by any one of the University's constituent units. 
Interdisciplinary doctoral programs will be instituted in response to the particular 
academic interest of individual students, not as programs of a permanent nature. 
The procedures and criteria given below govern the authorization and control of 
interdisciplinary doctoral programs. 

1. After admission to an established doctoral program at SIUC and upon the 
recommendation of the chairperson or adviser of that program, a student 
may apply for an interdisciplinary doctoral program to the dean of the 
Graduate School. 

2. The dean of the Graduate School will apply the following criteria in deciding 
whether a program committee should be established to consider the propx >>e< i 
interdisciplinary doctoral program. 

a. The requisite staff must be available. 

b. The library holdings must be adequate without unreasonable additions. 

c. The program must lie within the recognized disciplines or fields of study. 
at least one of which offers the doctoral program. 

3. If the dean of the Graduate School is satisfied that the proposed program sat- 
isfies these criteria, the dean shall form a special program committee of five 
members, at least three of whom shall be from units offering the doctorate. 

4. If the committee approves the proposed program, a plan of study shall be 
developed that includes the following elements: 

a. Fields or areas of study 

b. Required courses 

c. Languages or other research tool requirements 

d. Dissertation subject 

5. The program as approved by the committee and accepted for principal spon- 
sorship by a unit with an approved doctoral program shall be submitted to 
the dean of the Graduate School. Upon final approval the student's program 
shall have the same binding effect upon the Graduate School as programs 
printed in the graduate catalog. The degree earned shall carry the title of the 
doctoral unit that has assumed principal sponsorship. The commencement 
program shall give specific indication that the degree is interdisciplinary and 
include a listing of those units that are substantively involved in addition to 
the principal sponsoring unit, as determined by the graduate dean. 

6. When the committee has certified all the required performances, including the 
results of examinations, the committee shall be dissolved. 

Summary of Doctoral Degree Requirements 

Achievement of a grade point average of at least 3.00, 

Completion of any specific courses required by the doctoral program. 

Fulfillment of the residency requirement. 



Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

Completion of the research tool required by the doctoral program. 

Passing of the preliminary examination. 

Admission to candidacy. 

Completion of an approved dissertation with 24 hours of dissertation credit. 

Oral defense of dissertation. 

Submission of two approved copies of the dissertation to the Graduate School. 

Payment of $55.00 microfilming fee. 

Completion of microfilm agreement and survey of earned doctorates at the 
Graduate School office. 

1 tegree conferred not less than six months nor more than five years after 
admission to candidacy. 

Submission of departmental clearance form. 

Register for 601 Continuing Enrollment. 

General Regulations and Procedures 

This section includes Graduate School procedures and regulations applicable to 
all graduate students regardless of degree classification. Requirements unique to 
the master's, specialist, and doctoral degrees, are stated in the section titled 
Degree Requirements. For information about specific degree programs the stu- 
dent should consult the appropriate degree program description. Requirements 
unique to the nondegree classifications are stated in the section in this chapter 
titled Unclassified Students — Non-Degree. 

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATE STUDY 

Students interested in admission to degree programs should contact appropriate 
departments directly to obtain official Graduate School application forms and 
other departmental materials. Students interested in unclassified (non-degree 
program affiliated) status, should contact the Graduate School directly to obtain 
application materials. In addition, students should carefully read directions 
obtained from departments on where to send official transcripts. Regardless of 
where the official transcripts are eventually sent, such transcripts must be 
forwarded directly from the registrar of previously attended schools (other than 
SIUC). 

Transcripts 

Students must have the registrar of each college previously attended (except 
SIUC) send an official transcript of the student record to either the Graduate 
School or the degree program director (check departmental procedures). Students 
applying for unclassified (non-degree status) must have the registrar of the 
degree-granting institution send one official transcript indicating the receipt of 
the bachelor's (or higher) degree to the Graduate School. Transcripts from 
institutions where the student received neither a degree nor enrolled for more 
than 12 semester hours of undergraduate credit are not required, provided that 
the grades obtained at such institutions are recorded upon the transcript of the 
college which granted the student's degree. Transcripts submitted directly by 
students are not acceptable. Transcripts and other admission credentials will not 
be returned nor forwarded to other institutions. 

In accord with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, no 
non-Southern Illinois University at Carbondale person, firm, or agency may 
have access to an applicant's or a student's credentials without written consent of 
the individual concerned. Graduate students shall be permitted to examine their 
own records upon request. Such requests should be made by the student to the 
dean of the Graduate School. 



The Graduate School General Regulations and Procedure 

Test Scores 

The Graduate School docs not require the Graduate Record Exam i ( rRE h 
ever, various departments may require, at their discretion, the GMA1 1 rRE MAI 
or other appropriate standardized tests for admission. Refer to the departmental 
program description or contact the department for specific information 

Deadlines 

In order- to he fully admitted to a degree program at the beginning of the academic 

term, an applicant should see to it that all required admissions materials are 
suhmitted no later than 90 days prior to the beginning of the term lor which tin- 
applicant is seeking admission. 

Admission is for the term indicated and a student who does not enroll in courses 
for that term will he required to update the application by notifying the ( Graduate 
School before being allowed to enroll in courses. 

If the term for which the applicant is applying is more than two years after the 
term of original admission, a student applying to a degree program must have the 
registrar of all institutions previously attended furnish official transcripts. An 
unclassified, nondegree student must have the registrar of the bachelor's deg 
granting institution furnish one official transcript. If a student is applying to a 
degree program and has taken any course work at another institution between 
the first admission and the first registration, the applicant must have the 
registrar of the appropriate institutions furnish official transcripts of this work 
regardless of the amount of time elapsed. 

Requirements 

The admission requirements of the Graduate School and the department must 
both be met before the student is admitted to a degree program, and both the 
Graduate School and the department may specify conditions. Most departments 
require additional materials such as letters of recommendation and these should 
be forwarded directly to the applicant's major department. The student will be 
informed by the Graduate School of the resultant admission status after this 
process has been completed. 

Admission of Faculty Members 

No one who holds a faculty appointment at any of the academic ranks — lecturer. 
instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, and professor — shall be admit- 
ted to a graduate degree program at any level, or be eligible to register for courses 
to be taken for graduate credit, in the graduate degree program in which the 
faculty member holds the appointment. If a faculty member has been admitted to 
a graduate degree program in some unit other than the one in which such 
appointment exists, no member of the faculty of the unit in which the appoint- 
ment is held may be a member of that colleague's thesis committee, graduate 
program committee, dissertation committee, or any other examining committee. 
^See also faculty appointments in the section titled Financial Assistance.) 

Admission of International Students 

This school is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant alien 
tudents. A student from abroad is subject to all requirements for admission 
established by the Graduate School. In addition, the applicant must complete 
pecial forms pertaining to the admission of international students. For these 
admission forms and for other information concerning international students. 
.nquiries should be sent to the Graduate School. 
To allow ample time for visa and other departure procedures, the applicant 
hould have an application and all supporting documents on file with the Univer- 
sity no less than four months prior to the proposed entry date. 



00 



duate Catalog Chapter 1\ 



International students must be enrolled in a program leading to a graduate] 
degree. They cannot be admitted as unclassified students. 

[f the above requirements are satisfactorily met and the student is admitted toaj 
degree program, the applicant will be required to certify that personally adequate? 
financial resources will be available to undertake and continue in a program of 
study. 

Testof English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). All applicants whose native or 
first language is not English must take the TOEFL test no more than 12 months* 
prior to the term for which the applicant is seeking admission. A minimum! 
TOEFL score of 550 is required for Graduate School admission; higher scores! 
may be required for admission into specific degree programs. 

Exemptions to the TOEFL requirement are: (1) an applicant who hasj 
completed a bachelor's degree (four years attendance and completion of at leastj 
LOO semester hours of course work) at an accredited institution in the United I 
States; (2) an applicant who has completed a master's degree at an accredited! 
institution in the United States, who obtained a TOEFL score of at least 550 prior] 
to beginning graduate studies and who has been in residence in the United States 
continuously prior to application to SIUC. Verification of the earlier TOEFL | 
score by the degree granting institution is mandatory. 

Academic Requirements. If a foreign-born applicant has completed a four-year 
bachelor's degree program at an accredited institution in the United States of 
America, the applicant may be given the same consideration for admission to a 
graduate degree program as a United States citizen, in regard to both academic 
requirements and the use of English as a foreign language. 

Applicants who have completed the equivalent of a four-year bachelor's degree 
at a recognized institution in any other country must have an academic record 
equivalent to a 2.70 grade point average (A - 4.00) for admission to a master's 
degree program. 

The determination of the applicant's grade point average shall be thef 
responsibility of the Graduate School. 

Applicants for doctoral programs must meet the regular academic require- 
ments for admission to a doctoral program. 

Qualification for Assistantship with Teaching Duties. Every non-native 

English speaker assigned a graduate assistantship with teaching duties must 
pass an examination of oral English skill before undertaking classroom duties. A 
representative of the appointing department and of the Graduate School must 
participate in the examination. 

REGISTRATION 

Only those students who have been officially admitted by the Graduate School 
will be permitted to register. 

Each student admitted to a degree program must consult a graduate adviser in 
the designated major department before going to the graduate desk of the Office 
of Admissions and Records for registration. 

Unclassified nondegree students begin registration immediately at the gradu- 
ate desk in the Office of Admissions and Records. 

The schedule of classes for a particular semester or for the summer session is- 
available from the Registration Center in the Office of Admissions and Records. 

Students are strongly encouraged to complete their registration before the 
beginning of classes. After the beginning of the term, the student must have the 
approval of the Graduate School to register late and may be required to pay a late 
registration fee. Program changes after registration must be approved by the 



77/r Graduate School General Regulation* and Prtx edit 

student's adviser and the dean ol the Graduate School and may im lent 

of a program change fee. In addition, after the first week ofcli ition or 

program changes involving adding .1 course must have the approval o\ the 
instructor of each course. 
Information concerning registration dates and deadlines for the first time the 

Student attends the University will be sent when the student if admitted to the 

Graduate School. Continuing students should consult the Schedule of Classes for 

each semester to find deadlines and dates for registration. 

(graduate Mail Registration 

During the advance registration period for a term (see registration calendar tor 

dates in the Schedule of ( Masses) graduate students admitted to a degree program, 
and admitted unclassified graduate students have the opportunity to register by 
mail. Graduate students admitted into a degree program should contact their 
graduate adviser to have the adviser sign their Course Request Form af 
prerequisite to the process. Unclassified graduate students need not obtain an 
advisers signature. 

Late Registration 

A late registration fee of $15 shall be assessed to all students taking on-campus 
classes who register after the designated registration period. This fee shall be 
nonrefundable and nonwaiverable, except when it is clearly shown that the late 
registration was caused by faculty or administrative action. ( Mi-campus i las* - 
and registration in 599, 600, and 601 shall be exempt from such fee. 

Withdrawal from Courses and from the University 

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES 

Students officially registered for courses must withdraw formally. They must 
process an official withdrawal form. Outlined below are the procedures to be 
followed by graduate students when withdrawing from courses. 

DEADLINES FOR WITHDRAWING FROM THE UNIVERSITY OR FROM A COURSE 

If Classes Deadline tor Withdrawal Deadline 

Meet for to Receive Refund to Withdraw 

13-16 weeks 3rd week 8th week 

9-12 weeks 2nd week 6th week 

7 or 8 weeks 2nd week 4th week 

4-6 weeks 1st week 3rd week 

2 or 3 weeks 1st week 1st week 

less than 2 weeks 2nd day 2nd day 

Students officially withdraw from courses through the program change 
process. This process starts with the academic adviser and is completed at the 
Registration Center. Graduate Students may withdraw from a course through the 
8th week of the fall and spring semesters. Withdrawal deadlines for shorter 
sessions are correspondingly earlier (see schedule above). Official withdrawals 
during the first three weeks of the semester result in no entry being made on the 
student's record. Official withdrawals after the third week but prior to the 8th 
week of classes will result in the course listed on the student's record with the 
symbol W and the week of withdrawal. No withdrawals from a course will be 
authorized after the 8th week of classes. It is the student's responsibility to insure 
that the withdrawal process is officially completed. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

A complete withdrawal from the University may be authorized by the graduate 
dean at any time during the semester prior to the assignment of grades. Students 
who withdraw from all classes will have a statement o{ withdrawal from the 



24 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

University and the week of withdrawal entered on their records. Students who 
find it necessary to withdraw from the University after school has started and 
who are on campus should contact the Graduate School in person to initiate the 
withdrawal process. It they arc unable to come to campus, they may write the 
Graduate School asking that it process a withdrawal. 

Students who advance register, including the paying of tuition and fees, and 
then find they cannot attend school must process an official withdrawal the same 
as do those who withdraw after school starts. In this case the process is the same 
as outlined in the paragraph above. Students who advance register but do not 
clear tuition and fees by the announced deadline date have their registrations 
cancelled by the University. Students who have deferred payment of tuition and 
tees must officially withdraw if they stop attending classes; the failure to pay 
deferred fees by the deadline date does not cancel one's registration nor remove 
the obligation to pay the deferred fees. 

Refer to the section titled Payment and Refunding of Tuition and Fees in this 
chapter for information about the refunding of tuition and fees when withdrawing 
from the University. Refer to that section, also, relative to special considerations 
extended to students withdrawing from school for extended military service. 

Student Course Loads 

For federal financial aid purposes only, the following number of semester hours 
will be as full-and half-time: 

16-week semester 8-week session 

Full-time 12 6 

Half-time 6 3 

Maximum course work for graduate students is 16 hours each semester; 12 
hours is considered a normal load. 

The maximum and minimum loads for graduate students under various types 
of financial support are summarized in the following table: 

16-Week Semester 8- Week Session 

Type of Financial Support Max. Min. Max. Min. 

No financial support 16 8 

Graduate Assistantships 

1/2 time appointment 12 6 6 3 

1 4 time appointment 14 6 7 3 

More than 1/2 time appointment 8 3 4 2 

Full-time University employees* 8 4 

Graduate Fellowships 16 12 8 6 

Full Veteran's Benefits 16 10 8 5 

SIUC Scholarships 16 8 8 4 

' Civil SerVM <■ *t;iff munt have approval from the Personnel office to register for courses. 

A graduate student must enroll in 400- and 500-level credit work to meet the 
above minima. Audit work will not qualify to meet the minimum load. However, 
audit work is calculated in determining a student's maximum course load. 

Exceptions to these maxima and minima are possible only with the written 
permission of the graduate dean. 

Continuing Enrollment Requirement 

Students who have not completed all degree requirements but who have previ- 
ously enrolled for the minimum number of research, thesis, or dissertation credit 
hours required of the degree, must enroll every semester for at least one hour until 
all degree requirements have been completed. Summer sessions are exempted 
from the continuous enrollment requirement. Any graduate student who is not 
enrolled continuously as described above and who subsequently completes degree 



The Graduate School General Regulations and Prtx edun 

requirements, must have the permission of the graduate dean tograd 

permission will be contingent upon payment ol the tuition and fees that would 

have been paid if the student had enrolled continuously B€U h Bemestei 

Continuing Enrollment 601. This course is offered by each gradu 
program for students who have previously registered for the minimum number ol 

research, thesis, or dissertation credit required of the dc^n-c. Registration in 601 I l 
hour per semester) is required of all graduate students, whether m residence Of 
not, who are not otherwise enrolled. ( Concurrent registration in any other cour» 

not permitted. 

Students registering for 601 are assessed only tuition and the Student Center 

Fee for the credit hours associated with the registration. Since none of the other 
student fees are assessed for 60] , the student is not eligible for the benefits of any 

other programs such as Recreation Center use, Health Service and Student 
Medical Benefits, Students' Attorney Program assistance, etc. Students needing 

the above benefits that require fees may instead register for additional research, 
thesis, or dissertation hours. 

School of Law Courses 

A graduate student may enroll for graduate credit in law courses designated by 
the symbol G (e.g., Law 501G) if the student has permission of the dean of the 
School of Law and the dean of the Graduate School. Registration must be 
processed through the Graduate School and the grades will be reported on the 
Graduate School letter-grade system (A, 11, C, etc.). 

A graduate student may enroll in law courses for law credit only if the student 
has been duly admitted to the School of Law. 

A law student may register for law credit in graduate courses with approval of 
the dean of the School of Law and the graduate dean. Registration must be 
processed on School of Law forms and the grades will be reported on the Graduate 
School letter-grade system. 

A law student may not register for graduate courses for graduate credit unl< 
the student has been admitted to the Graduate School. 



Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance is available to qualified students in all fields of study m th 
form of (1) graduate assistantships where one serves as a classroom teacher 
assistant, as a research assistant, or as an administrative assistant. 
fellowships or traineeships, (3) scholarships, (4) college work-study progran 
and (5) loans. There are basic regulations that relate to these awards. Studen 
should make application for the graduate assistantships. fellowships, or trainee- 
ships through the department to which they have been admitted. Information 
and application forms for the tuition scholarship program may he obtained from 
the Graduate School office. Information regarding the student work program and 
loans may be had by contacting the Financial Aid office. 

Students should be sure that their applications for admission are complete 
including the submission of required transcripts to the Graduate School to assure 
consideration for an award. Unclassified graduate students (those not working 
for a degree) are eligible only for the student work program. 

Graduate assistant appointments, graduate fellowships, and most traineeships 
include a tuition scholarship, but fees must be paid. A student may receive no 
more than two calendar years of graduate-student support while a master's level 
student. A student may receive no more than four calendar years of graduate- 
student support while a doctoral-level student. These time limits apply to 
assistantships, fellowships, traineeships. and other similar awards and appoint- 



Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

meats administered by the University, regardless of source of funds. Students 
who are awarded graduate assistantships, fellowships, or traineeships, but who I 
have not furnished oftlcia] proof of their most recent degree to the Graduate 1 
School shall be considered to be on term appointment for one semester only. No 
one will be appointed to a second term until an official transcript indicating I 
receipt of the degree is received in the Graduate School. 

Acceptance of an offer of financial aid (such as graduate scholarship, ] 
fellowship, traineeship, or assistantship) for the next academic year by an actual 
or prospective graduate student completes an agreement which both student and 
graduate school expect to honor. In those instances in which the student accepts I 
the offer before April 15 and subsequently desires to withdraw, the student may 
submit in writing a resignation of the appointment at any time through April 15. 
However, an acceptance given or left in force after April 15 commits the student 
not to accept another offer from another institution without first obtaining a 
written release from the institution to which a commitment has been made. 
Similarly, an offer by an institution after April 15 is conditional on presentation 
by the student of the written release from any previously accepted offer. 

Graduate Assistants 

Graduate assistantships (GA) are available in a variety of places across campus, 
from academic departments and research centers to administrative and service 
units. This type of appointment comprises the largest number of awards offered 
by the University. For these appointments, students apply directly to the chair of 
the department to which they have been admitted, who may in turn refer the 
students to a research center or administrative or service unit. A graduate 
assistant must be a registered student in a degree program. Unclassified students 
are not eligible for graduate assistantships. 

The average GA appointment is 50% appointment (20 hours per week) and lasts 
for one academic year (9 months). There are also some 25% appointments 
requiring 10 hours per week. A student may hold two simultaneous quarter time 
( 25 ) appointments on campus without special approval. GA appointments may 
be either on a semester-pay basis or a fiscal-pay basis. 

Appointments of at least 25% time for the full length of an academic term 
qualify for a tuition scholarship. The appointment papers, however, must have a 
starting date on or before the fifteenth day of classes for the tuition scholarship to 
apply. If a student is appointed for less than a full academic term on a fiscal pay 
basis, the appointment will not carry a tuition scholarship. A GA who holds an 
appointment for the full academic term but resigns before the end of the term still 
is granted the tuition scholarship for that term. A GA holding an appointment for 
the full t JengU? oLiwo consecutive semesters will be eligible for a tuition scholar- 
ship theAsemesier immediately following the two consecutive semesters. 

Salary schedules for graduate assistantships vary from unit to unit. Currently, 
monthly stipends range from $598 to $812 (50% appointments). Generally 
doctoral students are paid higher rates than master's students. Information 
about the specific conditions of the appointment should be directed to the 
department or unit making the appointment. 

College Work-Study Graduate Assistantships 

The Graduate School and the Financial Aid office jointly administer the College 
Work-Study Assistantship program. This program supports approximately fifty 
graduate assistants each year. The program provides for up to 75% of each 
graduate assistantship from federal funds, with the remainder coming from 
departmental or collegiate funds. Students qualify for this program on the basis 
of financial need. Students must be citizens or permanent residents of the United 
States. Further information on application procedures and eligibility criteria is 
available from the Graduate School. 



The Graduate School Financial A i n \tam t 

Graduate Fellowships 

The Graduate School and some departments offer a number of graduate fell 

ships. The number varies depending upon the funds available for the 

each year. All awards ofthis type are highly competitive based upon scholarship 

and potential for success in graduate si udy. Application for these awards should 

be made by February I preceding the academic year for which the award is de 

sired. Application forms and information about the award may be obtained by con- 
tacting the department to which one has been admitted or is seeking adnn^ion 
The stipend for a fellowship is $650 per month, or $6,875 for eleven months for 
master's degree students; for doctoral degree students the stipend is $675 per 
month, or $9,425 for eleven months. Graduate School fellowships include a tuition 
scholarship. While on fellowships, students shall not hold other appointments in 
the University, nor shall they hold jobs outside the University, since the purpose 
of the fellowship is to provide students with a source of income which will enable 
them to work full time at graduate studies rather than work part time at a job and 
part time at studies. There may be a training assignment if this has been outlined 
at the time of the appointment. 

Traineeships 

Individual departments often are able to provide traineeships. Information about 
these awards should be directed to the department to which one has been 
admitted or is seeking admission. 

Dissertation Research Awards 

Dissertation research awards are designed for superior students who are in the 
dissertation preparation stage of their graduate education. Selection is based 
upon a competition primarily considering the students academic research and 
quality of the dissertation prospectus. Students who will have started their 
dissertations by the end of the fall semester (advanced to candidacy, completed 
preliminary examinations, and completed most of their course work and research 
tools) may apply for the award during the preceding spring semester. A recipient 
of a dissertation research award must be officially admitted to candidacy by the 
end of the semester in which the award begins. The application should be 
submitted by February 1. The award is for a maximum of 11 months at a monthly 
rate of $744 or $8,514, plus tuition scholarship. 

Students holding a dissertation research award are expected to devote full-time 
to the approved research project as determined by their department. The student 
should be enrolled for dissertation hours. The student holding such an award is 
expected to resign the award at the time the dissertation is submitted to the 
Graduate School if this comes prior to three weeks before the end of the time 
period for the award. 

Graduate Dean's Fellowships 

Several special graduate dean's fellowships are offered annually to students who. 
although not selected for a regular fellowship, in the judgment of the Graduate 
Dean show unusual promise for success in graduate studies. Students will be 
considered for these awards who have overcome social, cultural, or economic 
disadvantages in attaining their educational objectives. Application should be 
made through the chair of the department in which the student is enrolled. 

Stipend rates and related regulations are the same as for the regular graduate 
fellowships. There is no service requirement other than those activities which are 
required by departments of all students regardless of the source of their support. 

Delyte and Dorothy Morris Doctoral Fellowship Program 

The Delyte and Dorothy Morris doctoral fellowships have been established by 



28 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

Southern Illinois University at Carbondale to honor a distinguished former 
president ami his wife. During Dr. Morris's tenure as president (1949-71) the 
University grew to be a comprehensive research institution and established 
doctoral programs in twenty-two fields, now twenty-five fields. 

Eligible applicants must be at the beginning of their doctoral work. Therefore, 
applications prior to entrance into a doctoral program is required. Only 
applicants who have received no prior degree from SIUC and who have done no 
graduate work at SIUC are eligible. Applicants must possess the credentials of 
very promising scholars as indicated by high scholastic standing, excellent 
scores on standardized tests, outstanding recommendations, and evidence of 
high potential for research and publication. 

Morris fellows will receive $12,000 and a tuition scholarship for up to three 
years of full-time doctoral study at SIUC. Fellows are not eligible to hold another 
appointment either within or outside the University. Application deadline is 
February 1. Contact the Graduate School for application information. 

State Fellowship Programs for Minority Students 

The state of Illinois is currently supporting two fellowship programs for minority 
graduate students, the Illinois Minority Graduate Incentive Program (IMGIP) 
and the Illinois Consortium for Educational Opportunity Program (ICEOP). 
Both programs are designed to develop minority faculty and staff for Illinois 
institutions of postsecondary education; graduates of each program must agree to 
seek and accept appropriate employment in Illinois higher education. There are 
differences between the two programs in terms of eligible minority groups, 
residency requirements, eligible programs of study, etc. For further information 
and application materials, contact the IMGIP/ICEOP administrator in the 
Graduate School. While on IMGIP or full ICEOP awards, students may not hold 
other appointments either inside or outside the University, since the purpose of 
the fellowships is to provide students with a source of income which will enable 
them to study full time. All other rules and regulations governing University 
fellowships apply to these programs. Deadlines for applications are early in 
February for the following fall semester. 

Patricia Roberts Harris Fellowship Program 

This is an interrelated fellowship program that complements an overall Graduate 
School commitment to attract and retain increased numbers of highly qualified 
doctoral students from previously underrepresented groups. The present focus of 
the Patricia Roberts Harris program at SIUC is to recruit qualified minority 
students to doctoral programs in psychology, rehabilitation, and communication 
disorders and sciences and further provide a mechanism for their psychological, 
social, and educational support. Stipends for Patricia Roberts Harris fellows are 
SI 0.000 plus a tuition scholarship and waiver of fees. While holding a Patricia 
Harris fellowship, students may not hold other appointments either inside or 
outside the University, since the purpose of the fellowship is to provide students 
with a source of income which will enable them to study full time. All other rules 
and regulations governing University fellowships apply to this program. Contact 
the Graduate School for information. 

The National Consortium for Educational Access, Inc. 

The National Consortium for Educational Access, Inc. (NCEA) offers a funding 
alternative for those who wish to pursue study towards the doctoral degree. 
Through NCEA a fellowship award is given, contingent upon and supplemental 
to the financial assistance.' provided by a participating doctoral degree granting 
institution. Black Americans choosing to study in an academic area of under- 
representation or faculty members who want to continue to teach at the college 
or university level are encouraged to apply. An NCEA fellowship supplement 



The Gradu&te School Fituuu UU A ■ lisUiiu t 

averages between $3,000 to $7,000 per year, making combined rom 

N( 'FA and the doctoral degree granting institution between $9,000 to $1 5,00 
year. Annual fellowship renewals arc dependent upon satisfactory performs 

and normal progress toward the doctoral degree. 

NCEA structurally is a partnership agreement among 12 historically black 
colleges and universities, and over 2f> doctoral granting institutions (including 
SIUC) supported by corporations, foundations, and the university system 
Georgia, merged to provide a financial base lor those who can help M fa meet 

the following goals: ( 1 ) increase the pool of black Americans holding the Ph I ) 
degree in disciplines underrepresented hy hlack Americans and (2) simultaneously 
increase the number of hlack Americans with a Ph.D. degree who want to teach in 
our nation's colleges and universities. Therefore, two distinct kinds <>\ applicants 
are sought: faculty members working at a historically black college or university 
who want to continue to teach and the hlack American who wants to pursue the 
terminal degree with the intention of teaching in higher education. In addition to 
SIUG, the following doctoral granting institutions are participants in NCEA 
Alabama A&M University, Atlanta University, Ball State University. I)uke 
University, Emory University, Florida State University, Georgia Institute of 
Technology, Georgia State University, Howard University, Michigan State 
University, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Western Michigan Uni- 
versity, University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of California, Santa 
Cruz, University of Cincinnati, University of Connecticut, University of 
Delaware, University of Georgia, University of Massachusetts at Amherst. 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Pennsylvania, I'm 
versity of Pittsburgh, University of Wisconsin at Madison, and Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Virginia State University. For 
further information contact the Graduate School at SIUC or the executive 
director of NCEA, 296 Interstate North Parkway, Suite 100, Atlanta. GA 30339 
(404-421-3255). 

Tuition Scholarships 

A limited number of tuition scholarships are awarded to graduate students on the 
basis of scholarship. The award is for remission of tuition; fees must be paid. 

To be eligible the student must be admitted to the Graduate School and to a 
department, and the student may not hold another University appointment 
which provides a tuition scholarship. Tuition scholarship recipients must enroll 
for a minimum of 8 hours each semester (4 hours in summer). There is no service 
requirement other than the duties required by a department of all students 
regardless of their source of support. 

Application forms are available in the Graduate School office. Students should 
submit application forms at least one full semester preceding the semester for 
which the tuition scholarship is requested. 

Financial Aid Office 

Other forms of financial assistance available through the Financial Aid office 
include part-time employment on and off campus, cooperative work-study 
programs, summer employment, and student loan funds. 

External Support for Graduate Study 

Fellowships, grants-in-aid, scholarships, and other similar awards for the 
support of graduate students are available from many sources outside the 
University. Students are encouraged to apply for such awards. Information 
concerning appropriate external sources o( support may be obtained from the 
Office of Research Development and Administration or from department chairs 
or directors of graduate studies of the student's major department. 



Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

Faculty Appointments 

No student in a graduate degree program shall be appointed to any full-time 
faculty position m the department lor equivalent unit) while enrolled in the unit 
ia a student, with the Bole exception that a student who has already been 
admit tod to candidacy for the doctoral degree may be granted a term appoint- 
ment as an instructor in the unit while so enrolled. Such a term appointment shall 
not be renewable beyond a period of one year. 

Satisfactory Progress Policy for Graduate Students 

PURPOSE 

The federal government, the states, and SIUC have invested large sums of money 
in providing financially needy students with the opportunity to attain a post- 
Becondary education. Financial aid recipients are responsible for using the funds 
in an acceptable manner. Therefore, a graduate student who wishes to benefit 
from the receipt of financial aid must maintain satisfactory progress as defined in 
this policy. 

AUTHORITY 

The Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, and the final regulations set forth 
by the Department of Education in 34 CFR 668 require that institutions of higher 
education establish reasonable standards of satisfactory progress. A graduate 
student who does not meet these standards is not eligible to receive federally 
funded financial aid. SIUC shall make these standards applicable to the 
following federal aid programs: National Direct Study Loan, College Work Study, 
Guaranteed Student Loan Program, and the Auxiliary Loans to Assist Students. 
Classified graduate students only are eligible to apply for all of the above named 
federal financial aid programs. 

SATISFACTORY PROGRESS STANDARDS 

SIUC requires that a classified graduate student be making satisfactory progress 
toward a degree if that student wishes to receive financial aid. A classified 
graduate student is making satisfactory progress toward a degree if successfully 
meeting two basic academic standards. First, a classified graduate student must 
complete a reasonable number of credit hours attempted each academic year in 
attendance. Second, a classified graduate student must maintain a scholastic 
standing, derived from grades, that allows for continued enrollment at the Uni- 
versity under current academic guidelines. The following parameters will be used 
to define these two basic academic standards. 

Maximum Time to Graduate. A student's eligibility is terminated after the 
academic year in which a cumulative total of 120 master's hours (140 hours for 
Master of Fine Arts degree) or 140 doctoral hours is attempted. A graduate 
student must complete at least 50% of the credit hours attempted during any year. 
The student's progress will be measured annually after spring semester to 
determine the progress made during the last academic year of attendance. 

Grades. A student must be in compliance with the University's policy concerning 
academic standing, grades, and grade point average, as defined under the section 
titled Retention, and all other provisions in the current Graduate Catalog. A 
graduate student is academically suspended from the Graduate School is not 
making satisfactory progress. 

As allowed by the Department of Education, unclassified graduate students 
will not be considered under the standard maximum time to graduate but only 
under the standard grades. 

A classified graduate student who does not meet both the standards set forth 



The Graduate School Financial A \ tana 31 

above and has been provided a probationary period, or who Cannol 

mitigating circumstances, is not, maintaining satisfactory progi 
decree and is no longer eligible to receive federal financial aid fund ~ • • K\ 
for Mitigating Circumstances.) 

Nothing in this policy shall he const rued ;is ;i reduction of external require 
merits made by other federal, state, public, or private agencies when they am Brd 

or control financial aid. Examples of the private agencies are the Vetei 

Administration, Vocational Rehabilitation, and the NCAA. 

DEFINITIONS 

Credit Hours Attempted. These shall be defined as those credit hours for which ;i 
student is registered and will receive a grade from SIUC. 

Credit Hours Completed. These, for the purpose of the policy, shall be defined as 
the total number of academic credit hours for which a graduate student receives 

any grade from SIUC" other than failing, withdrawal, unsatisfactory, or audit. 
Incomplete and deferred grades count as credit hours completed. 

Eligible Students. These shall be defined as those graduate students who art- 
admitted to the Graduate School. 

Grade Point Average (GPA). Defined in the Graduate Catalog under the section 
titled Retention. 

NOTIFICATION OF INELIGIBLE STATUS 

It shall be the responsibility of the Graduate School to publish this policy and to 
notify by letter any graduate student who is no longer eligible to receive financial 
aid. Said notices shall be addressed to the student's most current home address on 
file with the University. IT SHALL BE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STU- 
DENT TO INFORM THE UNIVERSITY OF A CORRECT HOME ADDRESS 
AT ALL TIMES. The Financial Aid office will provide the Graduate School with 
a list of graduate students who are no longer eligible to receive federal financial 
aid. 

REINSTATEMENT 

Graduate students will have their eligibility to receive financial aid reinstated 
when they have reached the level of satisfactory progress required of them by this 
policy. They may achieve this status by having incorrect grades corrected or by 
completing the required number of attempted hours during the next academic 
year of enrollment without the benefit of financial aid. 

SATISFACTORY PROGRESS PROBATIONARY PERIOD 

A graduate student who has not met the satisfactory progress requirements 
specified above will be granted an extension for the following calendar year, and 
will be eligible for financial aid during this period. At the end of the probationary 
period, the student must have rectified the deficiency and be in compliance with 
all other established criteria in order to be considered eligible for federal financial 
aid. Only one such probationary period will be granted a student during graduate 
studies. 

APPEAL FOR MITIGATING CIRCUMSTANCES 

A graduate student shall have the opportunity to appeal in writing to explain 
mitigating circumstances. The appeal should be sent to the Graduate School 
within 15 days of receipt of the notice of ineligible status. The Graduate School 
will review the mitigating circumstances in the appeal and provide a written 
decision within 20 days after the receipt of the appeal. 



SS Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 1 



The Graduate School will provide written notification to the Financial Aid 
office concerning all graduate students who have been granted an exception for 

mitigating circumstances. 

Tuition and Fees 

Tuition and fees charged students are established by the Board of Trustees and 
are subject to change whenever conditions necessitate. All assessments are on a 
per-hour basis, with 12 hours considered full time. Students will be assessed the 
following tuition and fees each term: 

Graduate Student Tuition and Fee Schedule 



Semester Hours 
Enrolled 

1 


Illinois Residents 

Student 
Tuition Fees 

$ 65.00 $112.50 
130.00 128.63 
195.00 144.78 
260.00 160.92 
325.00 177.05 
390.00 193.20 
455.00 209.35 
520.00 225.48 
585.00 241.62 
650.00 257.78 
715.00 273.90 
780.00 290.05 


Total 

$177.50 
258.63 
339.78 
420.92 
502.05 
583.20 
664.35 
745.48 
826.62 
907.78 
988.90 

1070.05 


Non-Illinois Residents 
Student 
Tuition Fees 

$195.00 $112.50 

390.00 128.63 

585.00 144.78 

780.00 160.92 

975.00 177.05 

1170.00 193.20 

1365.00 209.35 

1560.00 225.48 

1755.00 241.62 

1950.00 257.78 

2145.00 273.90 

2340.00 290.05 


Total 
$307.50 


2 

3 

4 

5 


518.63 

729.78 

940.92 

1152.05 


6 

7 


1363.20 
1574.35 


8 

9 

10 

11 


1785.48 
1996.62 
2207.78 
2418.90 


12 or more 


2630.05 



The fees which have been established by the Board of Trustees are payable by all 
students unless they are specifically exempted by the Board of Trustees. All fees 
are considered to be institutional in nature and require payment regardless of 
whether or not the student receives direct benefits or is in a location which permits 
access to such benefits. 

Student fees include: Student Center fee, student activity fee, athletic fee, 
revenue bond fee, and student medical benefit fee. A microfilming fee of $55 is 
required of all doctoral students at the time the dissertation is submitted for 
approval. If copyright is desired, an additional fee of $25 is required. (Additional 
fee information is available in the schedule of classes.) Student fees include the 
following. 

Student Center Fee. Provides funds for the operation of the Student Center. 

Student Activity Fee. Provides funding for student organizations and activities 
on campus. 

Athletic Fee. Provides partial funding for the university intercollegiate athletic 
program. 

Revenue Bond Fee. Replaces funds which were previously obtained from tuition 
payments and used to under-write the funded debt operations of the Student 
Center and university housing. 

Student Medical Benefit Fee. Provides funding for a comprehensive student 
health program including emergency service; hospitalization; specialty, primary, 
intermediate, or infirmary care; and prevention program. A student who pays 



The Graduate School Tuition and Fee 

this $45.00 fee is entitled to full medical benefits at the Health Servu e ( )n>- who 

has comparable coverage may seek a refund within the first, t hree weeks of each 

semester by contacting the administrative director of the Health & 

Similarly, a refund is authorized for those students precluded from use oi the 
student health program by unusual or extreme geographic Consideration* 

Additional Fee Information 

1. Students should refer to the Schedule of (lasses for specific fee information 

2. Permanent full-time or permanent part-time employees may be eligible tor 
waiver of tuition and waiver of a portion of the student fees. (Graduate 
assistants are not eligible for a waiver of student fees.) Approval by the 
department head and the director of the Personnel office must be given prior 
to enrolling for courses. Employees who are approved pay only the Students 
Center fee and the Students' Attorney Program fee. 

3. Students taking courses in extension or at approved residence centers are 
required to pay tuition as listed in the table above but do not {jay student : 

4. Graduate students who have registered for the minimum number of credit 

hours required for their degree are required to remain registered in continuing 
enrollment. Refer to the section titled Continuing Enrollment Requirement 
previously in this chapter for the regulations governing this fee. 

5. In addition to the above fees, there is a graduation fee. For further 
information contact the Office of Admissions and Records. When submitting 
their dissertations, doctoral students are required to pay a $36.00 fee to cover 
the cost of publication of the dissertation abstract and microfilming the 
dissertation. If copyright is desired, an additional fee of $20.00 is required. 

6. Students holding valid state scholarships are exempt from the above tuition 
and fees to the extent provided by the terms of the specific scholarship held. 
Honorary scholarships, which have no monetary value, may be awarded. An 
Illinois State Teacher Education Scholarship, an Illinois Military Scholar- 
ship, or an Illinois General Assembly Scholarship exempts the student from 
paying tuition, the student activity fee, and the graduation fee. The Illinois 
Scholarship for Dependents of Prisoners of War and the Illinois Bilingual 
Scholarship exempt the student from paying tuition and all mandatory 
nonrefundable fees. 

7. Adult education course fees are computed on the basis of approximately sixty 
cents per contact hour. 

8. Other charges which students may incur are those for departmental field 
trips, library fines, and excess breakage. Also, students taking a course 
involving use of materials, as distinct from equipment, will ordinarily pay for 
such materials. 

9. Students registering for courses on an audit basis pay the same tuition and 
fees as though they were registering for the courses for credit. 

10. Out-of-state students will find the official University regulations governing 
determination of residency status for assessment of tuition later in this 
chapter. 

11. Students enrolled in public service courses only pay tuition and a $3.00 per 
semester hour fee divided equally between the Student Center and the Stu- 
dent Medical Benefit fund. 

Payment and Refunding of Tuition and Fees 

Tuition and fees are payable each semester during the academic year. Students 
who register in advance receive a Statement of Account in the mail and may pay 
either by mail or in person at the Bursar's office, by the deadline date, m accor- 
dance with instructions accompanying the statement. Otherwise their advance 
registration is cancelled and they must register again later. Students who register 
at the start of a semester must pay tuition and fees according to the schedule 



Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

which is in effect at that time. Students should read the Schedule of Classes for 
Specific information on payment of tuition and fees. 

Students who process a program change which places them in a different 
tuition and tee category than the one for which they originally registered will be 
hilled additional tuition and fees when appropriate. If the change places them in a 
smaller tuition and fee category and if they have processed the program change 
within the first three weeks of the semester, they will receive an automatic credit 
to their account 

A credit tor tuition and fees will be made to student accounts for students who 
officially withdraw from school by the withdrawal deadlines listed later in this 
chapter. They will receive a refund check in approximately four weeks after the 
withdrawal has been received by the Office of Admissions and Records. No credit 
for tuition and fees is made for withdrawal occurring after the deadlines, except 
as described in the next paragraph. 

Special consideration is extended to individuals who leave school for extended 
military service (6 months or longer). Students will be refunded full tuition and 
fees paid if they enter military service during the first five weeks of school. If 
students withdraw during the sixth through tenth weeks of school, they will be 
refunded half of the paid tuition and fees, and they will receive one-half credit 
without letter grades for the courses in which they were receiving a passing grade 
at the time of withdrawal. When the withdrawal occurs after the tenth week, 
students will receive no refund, but will receive both grades and credit hours for 
the courses in which they are passing. In all instances, a copy of the military 
orders or a letter from the commanding officer is required for verification of 
impending military service. To be eligible for these benefits students must remain 
in school to within ten days of their military reporting date. 

I )E FERMENT OF TUITION AND FEES 

Students who are experiencing a delay in the receipt of verified financial assis- 
tance through the Financial Aid office may be eligible for a cancellation waiver. If 
granted, a cancellation waiver prevents a student's registration from being 
cancelled even though tuition and fees have not been paid by the publicized 
cancellation date. 

Information concerning cancellation waiver procedures is available from the 
Financial Aid office and the office of the Graduate School. This information is 
also published in the Daily Egyptian each term. Guidelines may vary from term 
to term and year to year so students are advised to seek out accurate information 
rather than assume they qualify. 

Determination of Residency Status 

For the purpose of these regulations an adult is considered to be a student eighteen 
years of age or over; a minor student is a student under eighteen years of age. The 
term "the State" means the State of Illinois except in the following instances: (1) 
for the purposes of assessing graduate tuition, the president may take the term "the 
State" to include the Kentucky counties of Ballard, Caldwell, Calloway, Carlisle, 
Crittenden, Fulton, Graves, Hickman, Livingston, Lyon, McCracken, Marshall, 
Trigg, and Union. (2) For the purposes of assessing graduate tuition for not more 
than six hours the president may take the term "the State" to include the State of 
Missouri. Graduate students who take more than six hours per term will be 
charged out-of-state tuition for all semester hours taken during the term. Except 
for those exceptions clearly indicated in these regulations, in all cases where 
records establish that the person does not meet the requirements for Resident 
status as defined in these regulations the nonresident status shall be assigned. 
Evidence for determination of residence status of each applicant for admission 
to the University shall be submitted to the Director of Admissions at the time of 
application for admission. A student may be reclassified at any time by the 






The Graduate School Tuition and I ■• 

University upon the basis of additional or changed information 1 1 i if the 

University has erroneously classified the student n i Resident the change in 
tuition shall be applicable beginning with the term folio wing the reclassification 
if the University has erroneously classified the student as a nonresident the 
change in tuition shall be applicable to the term in which the reclassification 
occurs, provided the student has filed ;i written request for review in ac< ordancc 

with these regulations. If the University has classified ;i Student Bfi a Resident 

based on false or falsified documents, the reclassification to nonresident 
shall be retroactive to the first term during which residency status was based on 

the false or falsified documents. 

Adult Student. An adult, to he considered a Resident, must have been a bona tide 

resident of the State for a period of at least three consecutive months immediate 
preceding the beginning of any term for which the individual registers at the I 'ni- 
versity, and must continue to maintain a bona fide residency in the State, except 
that an adult student whose parents (or one of them if only one parent is living or 
the parents are separated or divorced) have established and are maintaining a 
bona fide residence in the State and who resides with them tor the one residing in 
the State) or elsewhere in the State will be regarded as a Resident student. 

Minor Student. The residence of a minor shall be considered to be. and to change 
with and follow: 

a. That of the parents, if they are living together, or the living parent, if one is 
dead; or 

b. If the parents are separated or divorced, that of the parent to whom the 
custody of the person has been awarded by court decree or order, or. in the absence 
ofcourt decree or order, that of the parent with which the person has continuously 
resided for a period of at least three consecutive months immediately preceding 
registration at the University; or 

c. That of the adoptive parents, if the person has been legally adopted and. in 
the event the adoptive parents become divorced or separated, that of the adoptive 
parent whose residence would govern under the foregoing rules if that parent had 
been a natural parent; or 

d. That of the legally appointed guardian of the person; or 

e. That of the natural guardian, such as a grandparent, adult brother or adult 
sister, adult uncle or aunt, or other adult relative with whom the person has 
resided and by whom the student has been supported for a period of at least three 
consecutive months immediately preceding registration at the University for any 
term, if the person's parents are dead or have abandoned him and if no legal 
guardian of the person has been appointed and qualified. 

Parent or Guardian. No parent or legal or natural guardian will he considered a 
resident of the State unless said person (a) maintains a bona fide and permanent 
place of abode within the State, and (b) lives, except when temporarily absent 
from the State with no intention of changing the legal residence to some other 
State or country, within the State. 

Emancipated Minor. If a minor has been emancipated, is completely self- 
supporting, and actually resides in the State, the minor shall be considered to be a 
Resident even though the parents or guardian may reside outside the State. An 
emancipated minor who is completely self-supporting shall be considered to actu- 
ally reside in the State of Illinois if a dwelling place has been maintained within 
the State uninterruptedly for a period of at least three consecutive months imme- 
diately preceding term registration at the University. Marriage or active military 
service shall be regarded as effecting the emancipation of minors, whether male 
or female, for the purposes of this regulation. An emancipated minor whose 



Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

parents (or one of them if only one parent is living or the parents are separated or 
divorced ) have established and are maintaining a bona fide residence in the State 
and who resides with them (or the one residing in the State) or elsewhere in the 
State will be regarded as a Resident student. 

Married Student. A nonresident student, whether male or female, or a minor or 
adult, or a citizen or noncitizen of the United States, who is married to a resident 
of 1 1 e State, may be classified as a Resident so long as the individual continues to 
reside in the State; however, a spouse through which a student claims residency 
must demonstrate residency in compliance with the requirements applicable to 
students seeking Resident status. 

Per* )ns without United States Citizenship. A person who is not a citizen of the 
United States of America, to be considered a Resident, must have permanent 
resident status with the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service 
and must also meet and comply with all of the other applicable requirements of 
thest regulations to establish Resident status. 

Armed Forees Personnel. A person who is actively serving in one of the Armed 
Forces of the United States and who is stationed and present in the State in 
connection with that service and submits evidence of such service and station, 
shall be treated as a Resident as long as the person remains stationed and present 
in Illinois. If the spouse or dependent children of such member of the Armed 
Forces also live in the State, similar treatment shall be granted to them. 

A person who is actively serving in one of the Armed Forces of the United 
States and who is stationed outside the State may be considered a Resident only if 
the individual was a resident of the State at the time of entry into military service. 

A person who is separated from active military service will be considered a 
Resident of Illinois immediately upon separation providing the person: (a) was a 
resident of the State at the time of enlistment in the military service, (b) became 
treated as a Resident while in the military by attending school at Southern 
Illinois University while stationed within the State, or (c) has resided within the 
State for a period of three months after separation. 

State and Federal Penitentiary. A person who is incarcerated in a State or 
Federal place of detention within the State of Illinois will be treated as a Resident 
for tuition assessment purposes as long as said person remains in that place of 
detention. If bona fide residence is established in Illinois upon release from 
detention, the duration of residence shall be deemed to include the prior period of 
detention. 

Minor Children of Parents Transferred Outside the United States. The minor 
children of persons who have resided in the State for at least three consecutive 
months immediately prior to a transfer by their employers to some location 
outside the United States shall be considered Residents. However, this shall 
apply only when the minor children of such parents enroll in the University 
within five years from the time their parents are transferred by their employer to 
some iocation outside the United States. 

Dependents of University Employees. For the purposes of tuition assessment, all 
faculty, staff (including civil service employees), and graduate assistants, as well 
as their spouses and dependent children, shall be considered as resident students. 

Definition of Terminology. To the extent that the terms bona fide residence, 
independent, dependent, and emancipation are not defined in these regulations, 
definitions shall be determined by according due consideration to all of the facts 






The Graduate School Tuition and I • 

pertinent and material to the question and to the applicable lawi ourf 

decisions of the Stale of Illinois. 

A bona fide residence is a domicile of an individual which ii the true I md 

permanent home and place of habitation. It is the place to which v. hen< 

absent, the individual has the intention of returning. ( Iriteria to determine this 

intention include hut are not limited to year around residence, voter registration 

placeof filing tax returns (home state indicated on federal tax return for purp 

of revenue sharing), property ownership, driver's license, Car registration, 

vacations, and employment. 

Procedure for Review of Residency Status or Tuition Assessment. A student who 

takes exception to the residency status assigned or tuition assessed shall pay the 
tuition assessed hut may file a claim in writing to the appropriate official for a re 
consideration of residency status and an adjustment of the tuition assessed. The 
written claim must be filed within 30 school days from the date of asst - Jment of 
tuition or the date designated in the official University calendar as that upon 
which instruction begins for the academic period for which the tuition is payable, 
whichever is later, or the student loses all rights to a change of status and adjust- 
ment of the tuition assessed for the term in question. If dissatisfied with the ruling 
in response to the written claim made within said period, the student may appeal 
the ruling to the president or his/her designee by filing with the appropriate 
official within twenty days of the notice of the ruling a written request. 

UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES 

All full-time University employees who wish to use the employee tuition and fee 
waiver (civil service and faculty) who are classified as graduate students must 
seek approval of the Graduate School to enroll in more than six semester hours of 
courses. 

Faculty and Staff 

Members of the faculty who are seeking this waiver of tuition and some fees, must 
apply each term for the waiver by completing an Application for Waiver of 
Tuition/Fees for Faculty form. Waiver application forms may be obtained from 
the Personnel office or from the graduate registration area. Admissions and 
Records, Woody Hall, A14. The form should be filled out promptly each term and 
may be turned in at the graduate registration area or may be mailed to the 
Personnel office. The amount of the waiver will be automatically credited to the 
student's account after the faculty status is verified and the application form is 
processed. 

Note that the waiver does not cover the Student Center fee. which must be paid 
by the student prior to the payment deadline in order to avoid cancellation of the 
registration. 

Employees in faculty-administrative positions will receive a tuition credit and 
credit applied toward some fees whenever they are employed at any time during a 
semester for which they are registered. If the appointment is at least a nine-month 
appointment, students may receive the tuition-fee credit for an additional 
semester which must follow' immediately the last semester of appointment. 
Students may option summer or fall in this instance. 

Civil Service 

Employees in permanent civil service positions will receive a tuition credit and 
credit applied tow r ard some fees only when authorized by the Personnel office 
after compliance with personnel regulations. However, civil service employees 
expecting a waiver of tuition and fees must process a Civil Service Tuition and 
Fee Waiver form through the Personnel office before registering. If the Personnel 



- Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

office approves the request, the student's account will then be credited with the 
amount of the waiver. 

Note t hat the waiver does not cover the Student Center fee, which must be paid 
by the student prior to the payment deadline in order to avoid cancellation of the 
registration. 

OTHER TYPES OF REGISTRATION IN GRADUATE COURSES 

The following discussion concerns students who are either unclassified for 
various reasons or are undergraduates wanting to take graduate-level courses. 

Unclassified Students— Non-Degree 

A person may apply for admission to the Graduate School as an unclassified 
student when the applicant does not seek a graduate degree or has applied too late 
to be admitted to a degree program for the term for which admission is sought. 

If an unclassified student is admitted to a degree program at a later time, the di- 
rector of that program may petition the graduate dean that graduate courses com- 
pleted while the student was unclassified be applied toward fulfillment of degree 
requirements. The student will be subject to the rules and regulations of the Grad- 
uate School and the department concerned including the completion of at least 9 
hours after being admitted to a master's degree program from unclassified status. 

Unclassified students are not eligible for fellowships, assistantships, or tuition 
scholarships. 

REGULAR UNCLASSIFIED 

A person who seeks admission as a regular unclassified graduate student must 
have been awarded a bachelor's or higher degree. A student admitted as a regular 
unclassified student may enroll in graduate courses as long as the student meets 
retention standards of the Graduate School. 

LATE-ENTRY UNCLASSIFIED 

An applicant to a degree program who meets Graduate School admission 
standards but whose materials are received too late for processing may be 
granted late-entry, unclassified status for the term for which admission was 
originally sought. The application papers will continue to be processed for 
admission to a degree program for the term following the one originally applied 
for. Whether or not work taken by a student who is unclassified because of late 
application will later count toward a degree will be decided by the Graduate 
School and the department concerned. 

TEMPORARY UNCLASSIFIED (ON-CAMPUS) 

An applicant who wishes to enroll for one term only or who has applied for 
admission too late to furnish official transcripts required by the Graduate School 
may be admitted as a temporary unclassified student. The applicant must sign a 
special registration form affirming possession of a bachelor's degree. No 
transcript is required. 

A student may register as a temporary unclassified student for one semester 
only. If the student wishes to enroll in graduate courses after this time period, the 
student must apply for and be admitted, either to a degree program or to regular 
unclassified status. 

TEMPORARY UNCLASSIFIED (OFF-CAMPUS) 

For off-campus students (courses with sections in the 800s) more than one se- 
mester's registration will be allowed in the temporary unclassified status. These 
registrations should not accumulate to more than 12 hours total before a student 
is required to apply for admission to a program or for regular unclassified status. 



77/r Graduate School Tuition and Fet 

undergraduate student Registration in Graduate Courses 

GRADUATE CREDIT 

An undergraduate student who wishes to register for ;i graduate cow <>r 

500-level course) for graduate credit must file the standard application for admit 
sion to the Graduate School and submit to the graduate dean a request for gradu 
ate credit. Forms are available in the Graduate School. J f the student i lemi 

cally eligible lor admission to a degree program, the student will he allowed to 
register as an undergraduate lor graduate courses for graduate credit when 
within 12 semester hours of completing requirements for the bachelor's dc^n*- 
An undergraduate student who meets these qualifications will he allowed to 

take graduate Courses for graduate Credit for one semester or one summer term. If, 
at the end of the term, the student has not received the bachelor's degree, 

permission to enroll in graduate courses for graduate credit will he withdrawn 
until after the bachelor's degree has heen conferred. 

UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

The Graduate School has the responsibility of approving the registration of 
undergraduate students in 500-level courses for undergraduate credit. Under- 
graduate students should only be encouraged to take 500-level courses if they are 
properly qualified. In dealing with these requests the following procedures must 
be followed. 

The chair of the department offering the course, in collaboration with the 
instructor who is teaching the particular course, should forward a letter to the 
graduate dean indicating their approval for this student to enroll in the 500-1. 
course for undergraduate credit. Since such a request should only be made for 
superior students, the letters should include such information as: (1) under- 
graduate GPA; (2) general description of the student's academic work; and (3) 
why this course would be beneficial. The student must stop by the Graduate 
School to obtain permission to enroll upon receipt of the letter by the graduate 
dean. If permission to enroll has been granted by the graduate dean, this will be 
indicated to the registration center. Accordingly, the student should bring the 
request form or add/drop slip to the Graduate School. 

Additional Information 

Residence-Center Credit 

Credit earned at approved graduate residence centers and credit earned in off- 
campus courses for which graduate credit has been approved will be entered on a 
student's record as on-campus credit earned at SIUC. 

Students enrolled for credit in approved residence-center master's degree pro- 
grams or in specific residence-credit courses must have been officially admitted 
(either in a degree program or unclassified) to the Graduate School at SIUC. 

For information about specific programs and courses, the student should 
consult the appropriate department. 

Transfer Credit 

All graduate credits earned by a student in good standing at an accredited 
university, which have not been applied toward fulfillment of requirements for 
another degree, are eligible for transfer to that student's degree program, subject 
to general limitations of Graduate School regulations, to residency requirements 
for doctoral degree programs, and to acceptance by the student's major depart- 
ment. All transfer credits are subject to final review by the graduate dean. No 
transfer credit will be given for work bearing a grade below B without express 
permission of the graduate dean in response to written petition from the student's 



40 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

department. No credit toward a degree may be earned by correspondence nor in 
extension courses at another university. In the case of a master's degree, the 
student must earn at least half of the credit applied toward fulfillment of degree 
requirements in courses offered by SIUC. 

The department recommending the graduate degree shall administer all I 
required general and final examinations, and a member of the graduate faculty at 
SIUC shall direct the student's master's thesis, required research paper, or! 
doctoral dissertation. 

Graduate Grading System 

A Excellent. 4 grade points. 
B Good. 3 grade points. 

C Conditional, not fully satisfactory. 2 grade points. 
D Poor, not satisfactory. 1 grade point. 
F Failure. grade points. 

S Satisfactory. Used for thesis and dissertation credit and certain designated 
and approved 500-level research, internship, and practicum courses. Is not 
counted in calculating grade-point average. 

U Unsatisfactory. Used for thesis and dissertation credit and certain desig- 
nated and approved 500-level research, internship, and practicum courses. Is not 
counted in calculating grade-point average. 

W Authorized withdrawal made through a program change. Work may not be 
completed. Refer to grade explanation below. 

INC Incomplete. Has permission of the instructor to be completed within a 
period of time designated by the instructor. Refer to grade explanation below. 
DEF Deferred. Used only for certain designated and approved 500-level courses 
of an individual continuing nature such as research, thesis, or dissertation. Refer 
to grade explanation below. 
A U Audit. No grade or credit earned. Refer to grade explanation below. 

GRADING SYSTEM EXPLANATION 

Only courses for which the grades of A, B, C, or S have been received are accept- 
able in fulfillment of graduate degree requirements. The letter grades A, B, C, D, 
and F are included in computing the grade-point averages for academic retention. 
If a graduate student repeats a course with the permission of the graduate dean, 
both grades will be counted in the grade-point average. Graduate students will 
not receive graduate credit for Pass/Fail grades. They may not receive a grade of 
Pass/Fail in a 400-level course graded Pass/Fail on an elective basis. 

400-level courses. Most 400-level courses may be taken for graduate credit. The 
graduate catalog will indicate those 400-level courses which may not be taken for 
graduate credit. No grades of Pass/ Fail may be given for a 400-level course for 
graduate credit. The instructor in a 400-level course which can be taken for 
graduate credit has the discretion to decide whether to require additional work for 
graduate credit. 

Withdra wal. A W indicates authorized withdrawal from a course prior to the date 
indicated in the schedule of classes for the term in which the course was taken. 
The student's record will reflect the courses from which the student had 
withdrawn with the symbol W and the week of withdrawal. Program changes to 
drop a course during the first three weeks of classes result in no entry being made 
on the student's record (consult the section entitled Withdrawal from Courses and 
from the University for additional information on withdrawal procedures and 
deadlines). 

Incomplete. An INC is assigned when, for reasons beyond their control, students 



The Graduate School Additional Information / 41 

engaged in passing work are unable to complete all class assignments. An INC 
must be changed to a completed grade within a time period designated by the 
instructor. INC is not included in grade-point computation. 

To complete the work from the original registration, a student should not 
register for the course again, but should complete the work for the original 
registration if the original registration is within the normal time limits estab- 
lished for the degree. 

Deferred. When the work is completed in a course for which DEF has been 
assigned, the grade is changed to a letter grade by the instructor, except in the 
case of theses and dissertations. When a thesis or dissertation has been submitted 
to the Graduate School as approved, the grade is automatically changed to S. If a 
thesis or dissertation is found unacceptable and the student is dismissed from the 
program, the grade of Uis automatically assigned upon receipt by the Graduate 
School of the action dismissing the student. 

Audit. A student registering for a course on an audit basis receives no letter grade 
and no credit hours. The student's registration must indicate audit registration 
and the same fees are paid as when registering for credit. During the first three 
weeks of a regular semester a student registered for a course for credit may change 
to audit status or vice versa through the official program change process. 
Thereafter, the change may not be made. 

Changing of grades. At the completion of a course the final grade assigned to a 
student is the responsibility of the instructor of the course. Grades given at the 
end of the course are final and may not be changed by additional work or by 
submitting additional materials; however, clerical errors in recording grades can 
be corrected. To correct a clerical error, the assigned instructors should submit a 
grade change card together with an explanation and justification of the grade 
change for the approval or disapproval of the department chair, the appropriate 
college dean, and the dean of the Graduate School. In cases of theses and dis- 
sertations, for which DEF grades are given, the Graduate School changes the 
DEF grades upon presentation and acceptance of the thesis and dissertation and 
receipt of the departmental approval papers. In courses for which INC and DEF 
grades have been given, the assigned instructors has the responsibility of 
determining the final grade to be assigned and notifying the Office of Admissions 
and Records of the final grade by means of the grade change card. 



Student Conduct Code 

Table of Contents 

I. Introduction 42 

A. Purpose 42 

B. Rights and Responsibilities 42 

C. Title/ Authority /Enforcement 42 

D. Jurisdiction 42 

E. Definitions 43 

II. Violations 44 

A. Acts of Academic Dishonesty 44 

B. Acts of Social Misconduct 44 

III. Sanctions 45 

A. Failure of an Assignment, Quiz, Test, Examination, or Paper .... 45 



42 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

B. Failure in a Course 45 

C. Disciplinary Reprimand 45 

D. Disciplinary Censure 46 

E. Disciplinary Probation 46 

F. Disciplinary Suspension 46 

G. Indefinite Suspension 46 

H. Interim Separation 46 

IV. Policies and Procedures Applicable to Academic Dishonesty. . 46 

A. Judicial Structure .46 

B. Informal Disciplinary Procedures 47 

C. Formal Disciplinary Procedures 47 

V. Policies and Procedures Applicable to Social Misconduct 51 

A. Judicial Structure 51 

B. Informal Disciplinary Procedures 52 

C. Formal Disciplinary Procedures 52 ! 

VI. Amending Procedures 56 

A. Review and/ or Revisions 56 

B. Amendments 57 

C. Notification 57 

I. Introduction 

A. Purpose 

Southern Illinois University at Carbondale is dedicated not only to 
learning, research, and the advancement of knowledge, but also to the 
development of ethically sensitive and responsible persons. The Uni- 
versity seeks to achieve these goals through sound educational 
programs and policies governing individual conduct that encourage 
independence and maturity. By accepting membership in this Univer- 
sity, an individual joins a community characterized by free expression, 
free inquiry, intellectual honesty, respect for others, and participation 
in constructive change. All rights and responsibilities exercised within 
this academic environment shall be compatible with these principles. 

B. Rights and Responsibilities 

Students shall be free to examine all questions of interest to them and 
to express opinions. They shall be guaranteed all constitutional rights 
including free inquiry, expression, and assembly. All regulations shall 
seek the best possible reconciliation of the principles of maximum 
academic freedom and necessary order. 

C. Title/ Authority/Enforcement 

These regulations shall be known as the Student Conduct Code for 
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. The regulations contained 
herein are established under the authority granted by law to the Board 
of Trustees to establish rules and regulations for Southern Illinois 
University and pursuant to Chapter 3 Policies of the Board of Trustees 
C authorizing the President to develop regulations dealing with stu- 
dent rights and conduct. All students of the University community 
have the responsibility to comply with these regulations. The re- 
sponsibility for the enforcement of the Code rests with the President of 
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale or that officer's designees. 
The effective date for this Code is June 9, 1986. 

D. Jurisdiction 

The University community has a responsibility to provide its members 
those privileges, opportunities, and protections which encourage and 



Tie Graduate School Student Conduct Code / 43 

maintain an environment conducive to educational development. 
Accordingly, this Code shall apply to (1) conduct occurring on property 
owned or controlled by the University, and (2) conduct occurring 
elsewhere, but only if the student's conduct has substantially interfered 
with the University's educational functions, including, but not limited 
to, interference with the educational pursuits of students, faculty, or 
staff or conduct having its origins in the educational process. 

When a student has been apprehended for violation of a law the 
University will not request special consideration because of the 
individual's status as a student. The University will cooperate fully 
with law enforcement and other agencies administering a corrective or 
rehabilitative program for the student. The University reserves the 
right to initiate concurrent disciplinary action. 

Academic dishonesty violations in the School of Law will be 
adjudicated through that unit's Professional Ethics Policy. Academic 
dishonesty violations in the School of Medicine will be adjudicated 
through that unit's Student Progress System. Law students and 
medical students on the Carbondale campus charged with other 
violations of the Code will be treated as any undergraduate and 
graduate student. In addition, law students charged with violations of 
social misconduct may also be charged under the School of Law's 
Professional Ethics Policy and medical students on the Carbondale 
campus charged with violations of social misconduct may also be 
charged under the School of Medicine's Student Progress System. 
E. Definitions 

1. "Academic officer" means any Instructor, Department Chairper- 
son, Dean, Director, or Coordinator. 

2. "Adjudication" means the resolution of disciplinary charges, 
including the appeal process. 

3. "Admission" means admission, readmission, re-entry, registra- 
tion, and re-registration as a student in any educational program 
at the University. 

4. "Appeal" means a process for reviewing an earlier decision. 

5. "Board" means the Board of Trustees of Southern Illinois Univer- 
sity. 

6. Charge" means an accusation of a violation of the Student 
Conduct Code of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. 

7. Code" means the Student Conduct Code for Southern Illinois 
University at Carbondale. 

8. Days" means all days when classes are in session. 

9. "Formal" disciplinary procedures are disciplinary procedures 
used when the question of guilt is contested or when the student 
accepting responsibility for the disciplinary charges prefers to 
have a full hearing on the sanction. 

10. "Informal" disciplinaryprocedures are disciplinary procedures 
used when the question of guilt is not contested and the student 
prefers to have an immediate decision on the sanction. 

11. "Instructor" means any teaching assistant or member of the 
faculty. 

12. "Members of the University Community" means the members of 
the Board of Trustees, employees, and registered students of 
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. 

13. "President" means that individual appointed by the Board as the 
chief executive, administrative, and academic officer of Southern 
Illinois University at Carbondale and any person authorized or 
directed by the President to act on that officer's behalf. 



44 Graduate Catalog Chapter A 

14. "Sanction" means a measure imposed on account of violation(s) oi| 
the Code. 

15. "Student" means any person registered for, enrolled in, or auditing] 
one or more classes. 

16. "University" means Southern Illinois University at Carbondale 

17. "University official" means any individual authorized or directed) 
by the President or that officer's designee to perform any dele- 
gated function. 

18. "Violation" means a breach of conduct governed by the Code-. The! 
standard of proof used shall be a preponderance of the evidence 

II. Violations 

A. Acts of Academic Dishonesty 

1. Plagiarism: Representing the work of another as one's own work. 

2. Preparing work for another that is to be used as that person's own I 
work. 

3. Cheating by any method or means. 

4. Knowingly and willfully falsifying or manufacturing scientific or ij 
educational data and representing the same to be the result of 
scientific or scholarly experiment or research. 

5. Knowingly furnishing false information to a University official 
relative to academic matters. 

6. Soliciting, aiding, abetting, concealing, or attempting conduct in 
violation of this Code. 

B. Acts of Social Misconduct 

1. Violence 

a. Rape 

b. Physical Abuse 

c. Direct threat of violence 
*d. Harassment 

e. Intimidation 

f. Intentional obstruction or substantial interference with any 
person's right to attend or participate in any University 
function. 

g. Participation in any activity to disrupt any function of the 
University by force or violence 

h. Reckless behavior representing a danger to person(s) 

2. Property Damage 

a. Arson 

b. Willful or malicious damage or destruction of property 

c. Reckless behavior representing a danger to property 

3. Weapons (unauthorized possession and/ or use) 

a. Firearms 

b. Explosives and/or explosive devices 

c. Any type of arms defined as weapons in Chapter 38 of the 
Illinois Revised Statutes 

d. Pellet guns and B-B guns 

e. Fireworks 

4. Disobedience 

a. Disobedience, interference, resistance, or failure to comply with 
direction of an identified University official acting in the line of 
duty. 

b. Trespassing 

c. Unauthorized entry 

5. Deception 

a. Furnishing false information to the University with intent to 
deceive 



The Graduate School Student Conduct Code / 45 

b. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of University documents, records, 
and identification cards 

c. Forgery or issuing a bad check with intent to defraud 

6. Theft 

a. Misappropriation or conversion of University funds, supplies, 
equipment, labor, material, space, or facilities 

b. Possession of stolen property 

7. Safety 

a. Intentionally entering false fire alarms 

b. Bomb threats 

c. Tampering with fire extinguishers, alarms, or safety equip- 
ment 

d. Tampering with elevator controls and/or equipment 

e. Failure to evacuate during a fire, fire drill, or false alarm 

8. Cannabis or Controlled Substances (as defined in Chapter 56 1/2 
of the Illinois Revised Statutes) 

a. Manufacture 

b. Sale or delivery 

c. Unauthorized possession and/or use 

9. Hazing (as defined in Chapter 144 of the Illinois Revised Statutes) 

10. Abusive or disorderly conduct 

11. Violations of University Housing regulations 

12. Violations of other duly promulgated University policies or 
regulations, including but not limited to, alcohol, demonstrations, 
pets, smoking, solicitation, and guidelines for access to data and 
programs stored on the computer, will be adjudicated under this 
Code. 

13. Acts Against the Administration of this Code 

a. Initiation of a complaint or charge knowing that the charge 
was false or with reckless disregard of its truth 

b. Interference with or attempt to interfere with the enforcement 
of this Code, including but not limited to, intimidation or brib- 
ery of hearing participants, acceptance of bribes, dishonesty, or 
disruption of proceedings and hearings held under this Code. 

c. Knowing violation of the terms of any disciplinary sanction or 
attached conditions imposed in accordance with this Code. 

14. Soliciting, aiding, abetting, concealing, or attempting conduct in 
violation of this Code. 
*Charges of sexual harassment may be adjudicated under the 

University Sexual Harassment Policy. 

III. Sanctions 

The following are sanctions which may be imposed for a violation of this 
Code. Also, a condition may accompany a sanction. Conditions include, 
but are not limited to, restitution of damages, work projects, required 
counseling or therapy, required academic performance, etc. A condition 
may include loss of certain university privileges. If a condition accom- 
panies a sanction, the condition must be related to the violation. 

A. Failure of an assignment, quiz, test, examination, or paper 
A failing grade (F) may be assigned for the work in connection with 
which the violation occurred. 

B. Failure in a course 
A failing grade (F) may be assigned for the course in which the 
violation occurred. 

C. Disciplinary Reprimand 
In cases of minor violations and when the violation is acknowledged 



46 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 ; 

by the student, a written reprimand may be issued by the Dean for 
Student Life or that officer's designee upon the recommendation of a 
University official. The purpose of the reprimand shall be to call to the 
student's attention the responsibility of meeting certain minimal 
community standards. Since a reprimand is given only when thei 
violation is acknowledged the sanction may not be appealed. 

D. Disciplinary Censure 

Disciplinary censure is a written warning to the student that the cited 
behavior is not acceptable in the University community and that 
further misconduct may result in more severe disciplinary action. The 
student may appeal the finding of a violation but may not appeal the 
severity of the sanction. 

E. Disciplinary Probation 

Disciplinary probation removes a student from good disciplinary 
standing. The probation shall last for a stated period of time and until 
specific conditions, if imposed, have been met. Any misconduct during 
the probationary period will bring further disciplinary action and may 
result in suspension. Probationary status prevents the student from 
representing the University in some extracurricular activities and 
may result in the loss of some types of financial assistance. 

F. Disciplinary Suspension 

Disciplinary suspension is an involuntary separation of the student 
from the University for a stated period of time and until a stated 
condition, if imposed, is met after which readmission will be permitted. 
Disciplinary suspension is entered on the student's transcript for the 
duration of the suspension. 

G. Indefinite Suspension 

Indefinite suspension is an involuntary separation of the student from 
the University for an unprescribed period of time and until a stated 
condition, if imposed, is met. Any consideration for readmission 
requires a written petition to the appropriate administrative official 
before readmission will be considered. The indefinite suspension is 
entered on the student's transcript for the duration of the suspension. 
H. Interim Separation 

If the President or that officer's designee has reasonable cause to 
believe that a serious and direct threat to the safety and well-being of 
the members and/ or property of the University community will be 
present if an individual is permitted to remain an active member of the 
community an interim separation may be imposed. A preliminary 
hearing or the opportunity for a preliminary hearing shall be afforded. 
If it is impossible or unreasonably difficult to conduct a preliminary 
hearing prior to the interim separation the individual shall be afforded 
the opportunity for such a preliminary hearing at the earliest practical 
time. The purpose of the preliminary hearing is to determine if there is 
justification to invoke an interim separation. During the preliminary 
hearing, the student will be provided a statement of the reasons for 
interim separation and will be afforded an opportunity to rebut. 
Interim separation is temporary and shall be enforced only until the 
completion of a full disciplinary hearing. A full disciplinary hearing 
shall be provided within a reasonable period of time. 

IV. Policies and Procedures Applicable to Academic Dishonesty 

A. Judicial Structure 

1. Department Level 

The department chairperson shall have initial jurisdiction over 



The Graduate School Student Conduct Code / 47 

complaints of academic dishonesty and may adjudicate the case if 
the student accepts responsibility for the violation(s). 

2. College/School Level 

a. Each Dean has the responsibility for the formal resolution of 
charges against a student. For the purpose of administering 
this code, the Graduate School Dean shall operate at the level of 
other deans. 

b. Charges of falsifying information on applications for admission 
shall be adjudicated by the Director of Admissions and Records. 
The Director of Admissions and Records, for the purpose of ad- 
ministering this Code, shall operate at the level of other deans. 

c. When social misconduct is also involved in an incident(s) of 
academic dishonesty, the Dean shall charge the student with 
all violations. All charges shall be adjudicated under the 
provisions for academic dishonesty. 

3. Presidential Level 
This level has jurisdiction to hear appeals. 

B. Informal Disciplinary Procedures 

1. Informal Hearing 
In cases where the student admits to a violation of the Code 
relating to academic dishonesty the matter may be adjudicated at 
the department level. An informal discussion between the in- 
structor and the student shall be held. If the student admits in 
writing to a violation of the code, the instructor shall recommend 
in writing a sanction to the department chairperson. The chair- 
person shall meet with the instructor and the student, receive the 
acknowledgement of responsibility from the student, receive the 
recommendation from the instructor, and apprise the student of 
the sanction. 

2. Sanctions 
The full disciplinary history of the student shall be considered in 
determining the sanction. Sanctions which may be imposed when 
the student accepts responsibility for the conduct are: 

a. The student may be removed from the class immediately. 

b. The student may be assigned a failing grade for the work 
and/ or course. 

c. The student may be placed on disciplinary probation. 

d. Any combination of the above. 

e. The department chairperson may recommend to the dean that 
the student be suspended from the University. 

3. Notification 
The department chairperson shall send written verification of the 
sanction(s) to the student. Such notification will normally be sent 
within five days of the meeting with the instructor and the 
student. 

4. Appeal 
The student may appeal the severity of the sanction or failure to 
follow prescribed procedure, pursuant to I V C 8. A student may not 
appeal the question of guilt. 

C. Formal Disciplinary Procedures 
1. Initiation of a Complaint 

a. Any member of the University community may initiate disci- 
plinary proceedings by filing a complaint within twenty days 
of discovery of an alleged violation of the Student Conduct 
Code. The complaint must be made in writing with all available 
evidence attached. The complaint shall be filed with the depart- 



48 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

ment chairperson in the unit in which the alleged violation' 
occurred, 
b. The department chairperson shall make a preliminary review 
of the complaint. If there are no grounds for disciplinary 
charges the complainant shall be notified. If the complainant 
wishes to proceed with a disciplinary charge a written request 
must be submitted to the appropriate academic dean within ten 
days of the receipt of the notification. The dean shall review the 
request, the complaint, and the department chairperson's 
decision and decide whether to pursue formal charges. 

2. Formal Charges 

In cases of alleged academic dishonesty where guilt is disputed by 
the student, as well as whenever there has been a recommenda- 
tion from the department chairperson for suspension, the case will 
be adjudicated at the dean's level with a formal hearing. The dean 
shall notify the student in writing regarding the chargers) as well 
as the date, time, and place of the hearing. The notification will be 
considered to have been delivered if the notice is sent to the current 
local address of the student as provided to the Office of Admis- 
sions and Records by the student. Thus, failure to notify the 
University of changes of address could result in a hearing being 
held in absentia. 

3. Formal adjudication 

a. The student has the right to: 

(1) Be apprised of all evidence. 

(2) Hear and question available witnesses. Sworn statements 
will be accepted from those persons unable to attend the 
hearing. 

(3) Not be compelled to offer evidence which may be self- 
incriminating. 

(4) Receive a written decision specifying judicial actions. 

(5) Appeal the decision, pursuant to IV C 8. 

b. The student has the option to have: 

(1) Advisory assistance. The responsibility for selecting anj 
advisor is placed on the charged student. The advisor may 
be any individual except a principal in the hearing. The 
advisor shall be limited to advising the student and shall 
not participate directly in the hearing. 

(2) An open or closed hearing. 

(3) Have witnesses testify in his/her behalf. Sworn statements 
shall be accepted from those persons unable to attend the 
hearing. Character witnesses may be excluded by the 
hearing agent. 

c. Hearing agent 

The charged student may submit a preference for a hearing 
before a judicial board or the dean or his/her designee. The 
dean shall decide the hearing agent. 

4. Judicial Hearing Agents 

a. Judicial Board Directives 

(1) Size 

A judicial board shall be comprised of seven members. A 
quorum required to conduct a hearing shall be five mem- 
bers. A decision shall be reached by majority vote. 

(2) Membership 

(a) Student members shall meet the following standards: 



The Graduate School Student Conduct Code / 49 

(i) Fulltime as defined by the Director of Admissions 

and Records, 
(ii) Good disciplinary standing since matriculation, 
(iii) Minimum grade point average of 2.5 (undergradu- 
ate); 3.0 (graduate); or professional student in good 
standing. 
NOTE: Fulltime University employees who are enrolled 
in classes may not serve as student members. Graduate 
assistants and student workers in the department in 
which the incident occurred shall be excluded from 
judicial boards. 

(b) Faculty members may include any person under faculty 
appointment, excluding administrators. 

(c) All appointments shall be reviewed by the Office of the 
Dean for Student Life to ensure that candidates meet 
the minimal requirements. A list of judicial board 
members will be available upon request within the 
office of the academic dean. 

(3) Judicial Board Operating Papers 

Each judicial board may develop its own operating paper. 
Each operating paper shall be reviewed by the office of the 
Dean for Student Life to ensure consistency with the 
provisions of this Code. 

(4) Administrative Advisors 
Each judicial board shall have an administrative advisor 
from the Office of Student Life. The advisor's role shall be 
limited to providing guidance and clarification. The ad- 
visor shall sit with the panel in both open and executive 
sessions. 

(5) Terms 
Each judicial board shall be in session for twelve weeks 
during the fall and spring terms and for four weeks during 
the summer term. A board is not expected to meet during the 
first two nor the last two weeks of a term. Disciplinary cases 
shall be adjudicated by an administrative hearing officer 
when a board is not in session or is defunct. 

(6) Powers 
A judicial board shall make a decision of guilt or innocence 
and shall make a recommendation on the sanction to the 
Dean. 

b. Administrative Hearing Officer 

The administrative hearing officer shall be the academic dean 
or that officer's designee. 
5. Judicial Hearings 

a. Time limitations 

(1) A student electing formal adjudication shall have a mini- 
mum of five days written notice prior to a hearing. 

(2) A student shall have five days after receiving notification 
of the decision in which to submit an appeal. 

b. Failure to appear 
Initial jurisdiction hearings shall be held in absentia when the 
charged student fails to appear. An appeal shall be dismissed 
when the student fails to appear. 

c. Tape recordings 
All formal judicial hearings shall be tape recorded. After the 
appeal period has expired the tape may be erased. 



50 / Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

d. Challenge for cause 

A student may challenge panel members for cause. The J 
decision to remove a panel member will be made by the other j 
panel members. 

e. Peremptory challenge 

A student may challenge one panel member without assigning j 
any cause. A peremptory challenge will be automatically 
honored by the chair of the panel. 

f. Confidentiality 

All evidence, facts, comments, and discussion at a closed I 
hearing and all executive sessions shall be held in strict i 
confidence. Failure to maintain confidentiality may result in 
removal of judicial board members by the dean. 

6. Sanctions 

A student's disciplinary history shall have no bearing on the 
question of guilt or innocence. If, however, a student is found to be 
in violation of the Code, the full disciplinary history shall be 
considered in determining the sanction. The academic dean shall 
request the student's disciplinary record from the Student Life 
Office. The academic dean and the Dean for Student Life shall 
develop lines of communication to keep each other apprised of a 
student's disciplinary history for this purpose. Sanctions which 
may be imposed are: 

(1) The student may be assigned a failing grade for the work 
and/ or course. 

(2) The student may be placed on disciplinary probation. 

(3) The student may be suspended from the University. 

(4) Any combination of the above. 

7. Notification 

The dean shall send written notification of the decision of the * 
hearing and sanction(s) to the student. Such notifications will 
normally be sent within five days of receipt of the judicial board's 
recommendation or within five days of the administrative hearing. 

8. Appeals 

Any disciplinary determination or sanction involving academic 
dishonesty may be appealed from the dean's level by submitting 
an application for appeal to the Vice President for Academic 
Affairs and Research within five days after receiving notification 
of the prior decision. However, the right of appeal does not guaran- 
tee that an appeal will be granted nor does it entitle the student to a 
full rehearing of the case. An appeal hearing, if granted, will be 
limited to the issues set forth in subparagraph c. below. 

a. The student may submit a preference for an appeal hearing 
before a judicial board or an administrative hearing officer. 
The Vice President for Academic Affairs and Research shall 
decide the hearing agent. 

b. The burden of proof at the initial jurisdiction level is on the 
University. At the appeal level, however, the student bears the 
burden of demonstrating error as defined in the following item 
(c). 

c. Three issues constitute possible grounds for an appeal: 

(1) Were judicial procedures correctly followed? 

(2) Did the evidence justify a decision against the student? 

(3) Was the sanction(s) imposed in keeping with the gravity of 
the violation? Previous violation(s) of the Code and the 



The Graduate School Student Conduct Code / 51 

accompanying sanction(s) will be considered in determining 
a proper sanction for a current violation. 

d. The appropriate committee of the judicial board or the adminis- 
trative hearing officer will review the appeal to ascertain 
whether there are sufficient grounds for a hearing. 

e. If an appeal hearing is granted the agent hearing the appeal 
will not rehear the case. The agent will limit its review to the 
specific points of the appeal that were accepted at the screening 
review. 

f. The agent hearing the appeal may: 

(1) Affirm the decision(s) of the initial jurisdiction. 

(2) Affirm the decision(s) and reduce the sanction. 

(3) Modify the decision(s) of violation and reduce the sanction. 

(4) Reverse the decision(s) of violation, remove the sanction, 
and dismiss the case. 

g. A student dissatisfied with the decision on appeal may seek 
review by the President by submitting such a request in writing 
within five days after receiving notification of the prior 
decision. Review by the President shall also be limited to the 
issues specified in subparagraph c. above. 

h. Further appeal may be made to the Board of Trustees by filing 
an application for appeal in accordance with Article VI Section 
2 of the Board of Trustees Bylaws. The Board of Trustees will 
review only those administrative decisions which meet the 
requirements for review established by the Board's Bylaws. 
9. Implementation of Sanction(s) 

a. The disciplinary sanction(s) shall be implemented when: 

(1) The student has waived the right of appeal, or 

(2) The appeal period has expired. 

b. The sanction shall be as specified by the final adjudicating 
agent. 

c. A student separated from the University for disciplinary 
reasons is subject to the normal guidelines for tuition and fee 
refunds, grades, and financial penalties for terminating a 
housing contract. 

d. Following the implementation of the sanction, all records 
relating to the case will be filed with the Dean for Student Life. 

10. Exceptions 

The above procedures shall be followed unless an exception is 
authorized in writing by the Vice President for Academic Affairs 
and Research. All requests for temporary exceptions shall be 
submitted in writing to the Vice President. Any exception allowed 
shall be limited to individual cases and shall not infringe upon a 
student's right to written notice, opportunity for a hearing, and an 
appeal. 

V. Policies and Procedures Applicable to Social Misconduct 

A. Judicial Structure 

1. Unit Level 
A case may be resolved informally by a University official in a 
department/ office as authorized by the Dean for Student Life, 
pursuant to V$FSB 1. All cases in which guilt is disputed shall be 
referred to the Student Life Office. 

2. Campus Level 
The Campus Judicial Board for Discipline and/or the Coordinator 
of Student Discipline has initial jurisdiction over social miscon- 



52 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

duct not handled by other offices. The campus level also shall hear 
appeals from the unit level. 
3. Presidential Level 

This level has jurisdiction to hear appeals. 

B. Informal Disciplinary Procedures 

1. Informal Hearing 

In cases where the student accepts responsibility for the social 
misconduct the matter may be adjudicated at the departmental/ 
office level. An informal discussion between the University 
official and the student shall be held. If the student accepts 
responsibility for the chargers) the University official shall 
recommend a sanction to the Coordinator of Student Discipline, j 

2. Sanctions 

The full disciplinary history of the student shall be considered in 
determining the sanction. The University official may recom- 
mend to the Coordinator of Student Discipline any of the following 
sanctions: 

a. Disciplinary reprimand 

b. Disciplinary censure 

c. Disciplinary probation 

d. Disciplinary suspension 

e. Indefinite suspension 

f. Interim suspension 

3. Notification 

The Coordinator of Student Discipline shall send written verifica- 
tion of the sanction to the student within five days of the receipt of 
the recommendation. 

4. Appeals 

A student may appeal the severity of the sanction pursuant to V C 
9 or failure to follow prescribed procedure. A student may not 
appeal the question of guilt. 

C. Formal Disciplinary Procedures 

1. Initiation of a Complaint 

a. Any member of the University community may initiate disci- 
plinary proceedings by filing a complaint with the Coordinator 
of Student Discipline within twenty days of the discovery of an 
alleged violation of the Student Conduct Code. The complaint 
must be in writing with all available evidence attached. 

b. The Coordinator of Student Discipline shall make a prelimi- 
nary review of the complaint. If there are no grounds for 
disciplinary charges or if the complaint should be processed 
under another policy the complainant shall be notified. If the 
complainant wishes to proceed with a disciplinary charge a 
written request must be submitted to the Dean for Student Life 
within ten days of the receipt of the notification. The dean shall 
review the request, the complaint, and the Coordinator of Stu- 
dent Discipline's decision and decide whether to pursue formal 
charges. 

2. Formal Charges 

In cases of alleged social misconduct when guilt is disputed by the 
student, the case will be adjudicated at the appropriate level with a 
formal hearing. The Coordinator of Student Discipline shall 
notify the student in writing regarding the charge(s) as well as the 
date, time, and place of the hearing. The notification will be 
considered to have been delivered if the notice is sent to the current 
local address of the student provided to the Office of Admissions 



The Graduate School Student Conduct Code / 53 

and Records by the student. Thus, failure to notify the University 
of changes of address could result in a hearing being held in 
absentia. 

3. Fact-Finding Conference 

The Coordinator of Student Discipline shall conduct a fact-finding 
conference which shall include the charged student and may 
include the complainant and/or witnesses. Matters to be examined 
at the fact-finding conference are: 

a. The charges) filed against the student. 

b. The evidence against the student. 

c. The witnesses, if any, that shall testify. 

d. The provisions of the Student Conduct Code. 

e. Whether to continue disciplinary procedures. 

f. The student may elect to acknowledge the violation(s) at the 
fact-finding conference and have a decision made on the 
sanction by the Coordinator of Student Discipline at the fact- 
finding conference. If this option is chosen the student may 
appeal only the severity of the sanction. 

g. The student may elect to have a formal hearing scheduled in 
the future. 

h. If the student fails to make an appointment for or fails to keep a 
scheduled appointment for a fact-finding conference the case 
may automatically be referred to the appropriate hearing agent 
for a hearing. 

4. Formal Adjudication 

a. The student has the right to: 

(1) Be apprised of all evidence. 

(2) Hear and question available witnesses. Sworn statements 
will be accepted from those persons unable to attend the 
hearing. 

(3) Not be compelled to offer evidence which may be self- 
incriminating. 

(4) Receive a written decision specifying judicial actions. 

(5) Appeal the decision, pursuant to V C 9. 

b. The student has the option to have: 

(1) Advisory assistance. The responsibility for selecting an 
advisor is placed on the charged student. The advisor may 
be any individual except a principal in the hearing. The 
advisor shall be limited to advising the student and shall 
not participate directly in the hearing. 

(2) An open or closed hearing. 

(3) Witnesses testify in his/her behalf. Sworn statements shall 
be accepted from those persons unable to attend the 
hearing. Character witnesses shall be excluded. 

c. Hearing agent 
The charged student may submit a preference for a hearing be- 
fore a judicial board or an administrative hearing officer. The 
appropriate University official may decide the hearing agent. 

5. Judicial Hearing Agents 
a. Judicial Board Directives 

(1) Size 
A judicial board shall be comprised of seven members. A 
quorum required to conduct a hearing shall be five mem- 
bers. A decision shall be reached by majority vote. 

(2) Membership 
(a) Student members shall meet the following standards: 



54 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

(i) Fulltime as defined by the Director of Admissions 

and Records, 
(ii) Good disciplinary standing since matriculation, 
(iii) Minimum grade point average of 2.5 (undergradu- 
ate); 3.0 (graduate); or professional student in good 
standing. 
NOTE: Fulltime University employees who are enrolled 
in classes may not serve as student members. 

(b) Faculty members may include any person under faculty 
appointment, excluding administrators. 

(c) All appointments shall be reviewed by the office of the 
Dean for Student Life to ensure that candidates meet 
the minimal requirements. A list of judicial board 
members will be available upon request within the 
office of the Dean for Student Life. 

(3) Judicial Board Operating Papers 

Each Board may develop its own operating paper. Each 
operating paper shall be reviewed by the Office of the Dean 
for Student Life to ensure consistency with the provisions of 
this Code. 

(4) Administrative Advisors 

Each judicial board shall have an administrative advisor 
from the Office of Student Life. The advisor's role shall be 
limited to providing guidance and clarification. The advisor 
shall sit with the panel in both open and executive sessions. 

(5) Terms 

Each judicial board shall be in session for twelve weeks 
during the fall and spring terms and for four weeks during 
the summer term. A board is not expected to meet during the 
first two nor the last two weeks of a term. Disciplinary cases 
shall be adjudicated by an administrative hearing officer 
when a board is not in session or is defunct. 

(6) Powers 

A judicial board shall make a decision of guilt or innocence 
and shall make a recommendation on the sanction to the 
appropriate administrator, 
b. Administrative Hearing Officer 

An administrative hearing officer appointed by the Dean for 
Student Life shall be available at all levels to adjudicate 
disciplinary cases. 
6. Judicial Hearings 

a. Time Limitations 

(1) A student electing formal adjudication shall have a mini- 
mum of five days written notice prior to a hearing. 

(2) A student shall have five days after receiving notification 
of the decision in which to submit an appeal. 

b. Failure to appear 

Initial jurisdiction hearing shall be held in absentia when the 
charged student fails to appear. An appeal shall be dismissed 
when the student fails to appear. 

c. Tape recordings 

All formal judicial hearings shall be tape recorded. After the 
appeal period has expired the tape may be erased. 

d. Challenge for cause 

A student may challenge panel members for cause. The deci- 



The Graduate School Student Conduct Code / 55 

sion to remove a panel member will be made by the other panel 
members. 

e. Peremptory challenge 

A student may challenge one panel member without assigning 
any cause. A peremptory challenge will be automatically 
honored by the chair of the panel. 

f. Confidentiality 

All evidence, facts, comments, and discussion at a closed 
hearing and all executive sessions shall be held in strict 
confidence. Failure to maintain confidentiality may result in 
administrative removal of judicial board members by the Dean 
for Student Life. 

7. Sanctions 

A student's disciplinary history shall have no bearing on the 
question of guilt or innocence. If, however, a student is found to be 
in violation of the Code, the full disciplinary history shall be 
considered in determining the sanction. The Dean for Student Life 
shall request the student's disciplinary records from the academic 
dean. The academic dean and the Dean for Student Life shall 
develop lines of communication to keep each other apprised of the 
student's disciplinary history for this purpose. 
Sanctions which may be imposed are: 

a. Disciplinary reprimand 

b. Disciplinary censure 

c. Disciplinary probation 

d. Disciplinary suspension 

e. Indefinite suspension 

f. Interim separation 

8. Notification 

The Coordinator of Student Discipline shall send written notifica- 
tion of the decision of the hearing and sanction(s) to the student. 
Such notification will normally be sent within five days of receipt 
of the judicial board's recommendation or within five days of the 
administrative hearing. 

9. Appeals 

Any disciplinary determination or sanction involving social 
misconduct may be appealed to the next level in the judicial 
structure by submitting an application for appeal in writing to the 
Dean for Student Life or the Vice President for Student Affairs, as 
appropriate, within five days after receiving notification of the 
prior decision. However, the right of appeal does not guarantee 
that an appeal will be granted nor does it entitle the student to a 
full rehearing of the case. An appeal, if granted, will be limited to 
the issues set forth in subparagraph c. below. 

a. The student may submit a preference for an appeal hearing be- 
fore a judicial board or an administrative hearing officer. The 
appropriate university official shall decide the hearing agent. 

b. The burden of proof at the initial jurisdiction level is on the 
University. At the appeal level, however, the student bears the 
burden of demonstrating error as defined in the following item 
(c). 

c. Three issues constitute possible grounds for an appeal: 

(1) Were judicial procedures correctly followed? 

(2) Did the evidence justify a decision against the student? 

(3) Was the sanction(s) imposed in keeping with the gravity 
ofthe violation? Previous violation(s) of the Code and the 



56 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

accompanying sanction(s) will be considered in determin- 
ing a proper sanction for a current violation. 

d. The appropriate committee of the judicial board or the adminis- 
trative hearing officer will review the appeal to ascertain 
whether there are sufficient grounds for a hearing. 

e. If an appeal hearing is granted the agent hearing the appeal 
will not rehear the case. The agent will limit its review to the 
specific points of the appeal that were accepted at the screening 
review. 

f. The agent hearing the appeal may: 

(1) Affirm the decision(s) of the initial jurisdiction. 

(2) Affirm the decision(s) and reduce the sanction. 

(3) Modify the decision(s) of the violation and reduce the 
sanction. 

(4) Reverse the decision(s) of violation, and remove the sanc- 
tion, and dismiss the case. 

g. A student dissatisfied with the decision of the Vice President 
for Student Affairs may seek review by the President by 
submitting such a request in writing within five days after 
receiving notification of the prior decision. Review by the 
President shall also be limited to the issues specified in 
subparagraph c. above. 

h. Further appeal may be made to the Board of Trustees by filing 
an application for appeal in accordance with article VI section 
2 of the Board Bylaws. The Board of Trustees will review only 
those administrative decisions which meet the requirements 
for review established by the Board's Bylaws. 

10. Implementation of Sanction(s) 

a. The disciplinary sanction(s) shall be implemented when: 

(1) The student has waived the right of appeal, or 

(2) The appeal period has expired. 

b. The sanction shall be as specified by the final adjudicating 
agent. 

c. A student separated from the University for disciplinary 
reasons is subject to the normal guidelines for tuition and fee 
refunds, grades, and financial penalties for terminating a 
housing contract. 

d. Any type of disciplinary separation from the University may 
be accompanied by a condition which bars the student from 
University property. 

11. Exceptions 

The above procedures shall be followed unless an exception is 
authorized in writing by the Dean for Student Life. All requests for 
temporary exceptions shall be submitted in writing to the Dean for 
Student Life. Any exception allowed shall be limited to individual 
cases and shall not infringe upon a student's right to written 
notice, opportunity for a hearing, and an appeal. 

VI. Amending Procedures 

A. Review and/or Revisions 

At the request of any recognized constituency, the Vice President for 
Academic Affairs and Research, or the Vice President for Student Af- 
fairs, the President or that officer's designee shall appoint a committee 
to consider amendments to this Code. The committee shall consist of 
two undergraduate students, one graduate student, two faculty mem- 
bers, one academic dean, one representative from the University Hous- 



The Graduate School Student Conduct Code / 57 

ing Office, one representative from the Student Life Office, and an ex 
officio representative from the Legal Counsel Office. The student and 
faculty members shall be designated by their appropriate constituen- 
cies. The Vice President for Student Affairs shall appoint a chairper- 
son for the committee who may be one of the members listed above. 

B. Amendments 
The President may propose to the Chancellor amendments to the 
Code. Whenever the circumstances allow, due consideration shall be 
given to the recommendations of the committee provided for in the 
preceding paragraph. Amendment will be accomplished by the regular 
procedures for amendment of University policy. 

C. Notification 
Any amendment of the Code shall become effective only after general 
notice of such change has been given to the student body, faculty, and 
administrative staff. General notice shall include, but not be limited to, 
public notification of approved amendments twice successively pub- 
lished in the Daily Egyptian in their entirety within seven days after 
approval of said amendments by the Chancellor. 

Academic Grievances Policy/Procedures 

Graduate students at SIUC shall have the right to appeal for redress of grievance 
through established channels. Access to these channels is restricted to graduate 
students who were officially enrolled at the time when the incident that has 
resulted in the filing of a grievance occurred. 

Each academic unit and administrative unit, as described in the Graduate 
Catalog, should establish a grievance procedure. In general, it is preferable that 
problems be solved within the University at the level at which they arise. The 
Graduate School should not be asked to rule on any grievance until prior channels 
are exhausted. 

In general, any question of the character and professional competence of any 
individual faculty member at SIUC will be considered to be outside the 
competence of the academic grievance committee* to judge. 

Procedure Governing the Academic Grievance Process 

Any graduate student may ask for and receive a hearing before an academic 
grievance committee.** This hearing is available to the student only after appeals 
procedures which are open to the student at the academic and administrative 
level at which the conflict arose have been exhausted. An academic grievance 
committee will be advisory to the dean of the Graduate School and will submit its 
findings to the dean. 

(Composition of the Academic Grievance Committee 

[An academic grievance committee shall consist of five members, and the 
imembers of the committee shall be appointed from those colleges/schools having 
graduate programs. Of those five members, three shall be appointed from the 
graduate faculty and two shall be appointed from the graduate student body. The 
dean will seek nominations from the Graduate and Professional Student Council 
for the graduate student members of a committee and from the Graduate Council 
for the graduate faculty members of a committee. The dean will designate which 
colleges/schools will have graduate student members appointed. The committee 
will be demographically representative of the University insofar as possible. The 
academic unit from which the grievance arose will not have a member appointed 



*Academic grievance committee— An Ad Hoc committee of graduate faculty and graduate students selected by the dean of 
the Graduate School to review graduate student grievances and advise the graduate dean of appropriate action(s) 
regarding such complaints. 
Grievances involving sexual harassment will automatically be referred to the Sexual Harassment Policy Board. 



58 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

to the grievance committee. An academic grievance committee shall meet and 
elect its own chair from among its graduate faculty membership. 

Filing a Grievance 

A graduate student desiring a hearing before an academic grievance committee 
will submit a written request to the dean of the Graduate School within thirty 
calendar days after the aggrieved had received the final decision of the person(s) 
who heard the complaint at the administrative or academic level at which the 
complaint had arisen. The request must state the following: 

1. Name of the aggrieved. 

2. Program in which aggrieved is enrolled. 

3. Name of the aggrieved's major adviser. 

4. Name and title of the person(s) against whom the complaint is lodged. 

5. A means of reaching the aggrieved. 

6. A statement of the grievance including descriptions of the incident(s) 
involved and date(s) of occurrence. 

7. Summary of grievance proceedings held at the previous administrative or \ 
academic level and the decision(s) rendered by the body/ administrator 
before whom that proceeding was held. 

8. A statement of why the previous decision was in error. 

Graduate Student Grievance Procedures 

Upon receiving a written request for a hearing regarding academic grievance, the 
dean of the Graduate School, in consultation with the Graduate and Professional 
Student Council and the Graduate Council, shall select an academic grievance 
committee. 

The committee shall review the written request to determine whether the record 
is complete and a decision may be rendered by the committee without additional 
hearing or whether a hearing should be held. This determination should be sent to 
the grievant within ten days of receipt of the written request by the committee. 

A. If the committee decides that no hearing is required, it shall review the 
materials submitted by the grievant and render a recommendation of the 
grievance within twenty working days after notifying the grievant that no 
hearing will be held. The recommendation of the committee shall be sent to the 
dean of the Graduate School immediately upon its completion. 

B. If the committee determines that a hearing shall be held on the grievance, a 
hearing should begin within thirty working days after that determination is 
made. In those cases, the grievant and the parties against whom the grievance is 
brought shall have equal opportunity to present relevant information relating to 
the grievance. The hearing shall be conducted by the committee and the following 
rules and procedures shall be followed: 

1 . The principal parties to the grievance shall have the right to be accompanied 
by personal legal counsel or an adviser of their choice. Personal legal 
counsel/ advisers will be permitted to advise their clients in the hearing but 
may not speak on behalf of their client without prior written approval of the 
committee. 

2. The grievant and the responding parties shall provide to the committee a list 
of witnesses to be called and copies of any documents which they seek to 
introduce into evidence at the hearing, copies of which shall be furnished to 
the opposing party. 

3. All hearings shall be open unless either of the parties request that the 
hearings be closed, in which case it shall be closed. If the hearing is closed, 
only the parties, their adviser, and the committee shall be present during the 
talking of evidence. Witnesses for either party shall be present only while 
giving testimony if the hearing is closed. 

4. All hearings shall be tape recorded. The tape recording will be deposited in the 



The Graduate School Student Conduct Code / 59 

office of the dean of the Graduate School at the conclusion of the hearing. 

5. The dean of the Graduate School or the dean of the affected college/school 
will ensure the appearance of those faculty members whose attendance has 
been requested by the committee. 

6. Written statements in lieu of personal testimony may be used only with 
permission of the committee and only in those cases where the witness is 
physically unable to attend the hearing. The opposing party shall be given at 
least three days notice of the fact that an individual will not be physically 
present to give testimony and may object to the use of written statements. If 
the committee determines that the actual presence of the witness is required 
to ensure fairness to all parties, the hearing may be continued until such 
witness is physically able to attend the hearing. 

7. Each party may call witnesses to present evidence. Each party shall have the 
right to examine any witness called by the opposing party. 

8. The committee will decide all matters, procedural and substantive, by simple 
majority vote. 

9. Each party may make an opening statement, no longer than fifteen minutes 
in length, before the presentation of any evidence. Each party may make a 
closing argument, no more than thirty minutes, following the conclusion of 
all evidence. 

10. In the absence of compelling circumstance, the committee shall make its 
recommendation on the grievance to the dean of the Graduate School within 
fifteen working days after the conclusion of the hearing. 

The recommendation of the committee is advisory in nature. The dean of the 
Graduate School shall decide to accept or reject the committee's recommendations 
and render a decision on the grievance within ten working days. The decision and 
the reasons therefore shall be submitted to the parties as well as the committee 
members within the same time frame. If the dean determines that additional 
evidence is necessary to decide a grievance, (s)he may remand the grievance to 
the committee for the taking of further evidence or may make arrangements for 
additional evidence to be presented within the office of the dean. The dean may 
limit the issues on which additional information shall be taken. When a 
grievance is remanded to the committee, the committee shall follow the procedures 
listed above in paragraph B. 

In the event that the grievant does not accept the decision of the dean of the 
Graduate School, (s)he will be advised as to the next level at which the grievance 
may be taken. 

Graduate School Procedures for Charges of Academic Dishonesty 
Leading to Possible Rescission of Degree 

INTRODUCTION 

Charges against a former student relating to acts of academic dishonesty in the 
submission of graduate degree requirements shall be handled to the extent 
feasible under the SIUC Student Conduct Code procedures applicable to charges 
relating to academic dishonesty. The dean of the Graduate School has the 
responsibility for the formal resolution of charges involving academic dishonesty 
in Graduate School programs. Since the Student Conduct Code procedures are 
not in all respects applicable to charges involving an individual no longer 
enrolled in the University, the following supplemental procedures will be followed 
for adjudicating such charges. 

NOTIFICATION OF CHARGES 

Charges against a former student involving allegations of academic dishonesty 
in the completion of graduate degree requirements shall be initiated by the dean 
of the Graduate School by letter to the individual, sent certified mail/return 
receipt requested, stating the specific charges, and the date, time, and place for the 



60 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

hearing, and enclosing a copy of the Student Conduct Code and these procedures. 
The charge letter shall be mailed no less than 20 business days in advance of the 
date of the the hearing. 

HEARING AGENT 

Charges shall be heard by a five-member hearing committee, the members of 
which shall be appointed from those colleges/schools having graduate programs. 
Of the five members, three shall be appointed from the graduate faculty and two 
shall be appointed from the graduate student body. The dean will seek 
nominations for a committee hearing a case from the Graduate and Professional 
Student Council for the graduate student members, and from the Graduate 
Council for the graduate faculty members. The committee will be demographi- 
cally representative of the University insofar as possible. The academic unit from 
which the charge arose will not have a member appointed to the hearing 
committee. Once a hearing committee is constituted it shall meet and elect its own 
chair from among its graduate faculty membership. The individual charged shall 
have the right to challenge membership of the hearing committee as provided in 
the Student Conduct Code. 

HEARING PROCEDURES 

Hearings shall be conducted in accordance with the formal disciplinary proce- 
dures set forth in the Student Conduct Code. In addition, the following procedures 
shall govern the conduct of the hearing. 

1 . The individual charged shall have the right to be accompanied by an adviser 
of his/her choice. An adviser will be permitted to advise the individual in the 
hearing, and to speak on behalf of the individual and cross-examine witnesses 
with the consent of the hearing committee. 

2. The dean of the Graduate School and the individual charged shall provide to 
the hearing committee a list of witnesses to be called and copies of any documents 
which they seek to introduce into evidence at the hearing. The committee chair 
will furnish copies of these to the other party. Such witness list and documents 
shall be provided to the hearing committee not less than 10 business days prior to 
the date scheduled for the hearing, and to the parties not less than 5 business days 
before the date of the scheduled hearing. 

3. All hearings shall be closed unless the individual charged requests that it be 
open. If the hearing is closed, only the parties, their adviser, and the committee 
members shall be present during the taking of evidence. Witnesses for either 
party shall be present only while giving testimony. 

4. All hearings shall be tape-recorded. The tape-recording will be submitted 
along with the entire case record and the committee's findings and recommenda- 
tions to the dean of the Graduate School following conclusion of the hearing. 

5. Each party may make an opening statement before the presentation of any 
evidence and a closing argument following the conclusion of all evidence. 

6. The charges against the individual and witnesses testifying in support 
thereof shall be presented first. The individual charged shall have the right to 
respond to the charges and present witnesses and evidence in his/her own behalf. 

7. Each party shall have the right to ask questions of any witness called by the 
other party. Members of the committee may also question witnesses. 

8. Written statements in lieu of personal testimony may be used only with 
permission of the committee and only in the event a witness is physically unable 
to attend the hearing. The opposing party shall be given notice at least three days 
prior to the commencement of the hearing of the fact that an individual will not be 
physically present to give testimony and so that objection may be made to the use 
of written statements. If the committee determines that the actual presence of the 
witness is required to insure fairness to all parties, the hearing may be continued 
until such witness is physically able to attend the hearing. 



The Graduate School Student Conduct Code / 61 

9. The hearing committee will decide all matters, procedural and substantive, 
by simple majority vote. 

10. In the absence of compelling circumstances, the committee shall make 
findings and recommendations on the charges to the dean of the Graduate School 
within 15 business days after the conclusion of the hearing. The dean of the 
Graduate School shall render a decision, absent compelling circumstances, 
within ten business days after receipt of the committee's findings and recom- 
mendations. The decision and the reasons therefore shall be submitted to the 
individual charged by certified mail, return receipt requested, and to the 
committee chair. If the dean determines that additional evidence is necessary to 
decide the matter(s), the dean may remand the matter to the committee for the 
taking of further evidence, and in doing so, may limit the issues on which 
additional evidence may be taken. When a matter is remanded to the committee, 
the committee shall follow the procedures set forth above. 

SANCTIONS 

Sanctions which may be imposed include the completion of any additional 
academic requirements deemed necessary for continued holding of the degree, or, 
if it is found that the degree was improperly awarded because of academic 
dishonesty on the part of the former student in the submission of degree 
requirements, a recommendation that the degree be rescinded. A recommenda- 
tion that a degree be rescinded will be made to the president through the vice 
president for Academic Affairs and Research, and will require final action by the 
Board of Trustees of Southern Illinois University. 

APPEAL 

If the individual is not satisfied with the decision of the dean, a written argument 
stating the reasons for such dissatisfaction may be submitted to the vice 
president for Academic Affairs and Research within ten business days after the 
date that delivery of the decision was tendered by the U.S. Postal Service to the 
individual. Such written argument shall be attached to the dean's decision and 
remain therewith throughout the remainder of the process. 

Retention 

Any graduate student whose grade point average falls below 3.00 will be placed 
on academic probation. Faculty of a degree program-unit may determine its own 
grade point average requirements (above the grade point minimum for retention 
in their particular program.) All 400- and 500-level courses taken after a student is 
admitted to the Graduate School are considered graduate level, unless the course 
is specifically designated, Not for graduate credit, for all students. Grade point 
averages for doctoral students are based on graduate credit work completed at 
SIUC after admission to the doctoral program. Grade point averages for master's 
degree students and unclassified graduate students are based on all graduate 
credit work completed at SIUC. 

Any graduate student on academic probation whose grade point average 
remains below 3.0 for two consecutive semesters in which she or he is enrolled, 
excluding summer sessions, will be permanently suspended from the Graduate 
School, unless the department and the collegiate dean petition the graduate dean 
for an exception. 

Graduation 

Graduation ceremonies are held each year at the end of the spring semester and 
the summer session. Degree candidates must apply for graduation with the Office 
of Admissions and Records by no later than the end of the first week of the spring 
semester or summer session in which the student plans to graduate. Candidates 
who plan to complete requirements at the end of the fall semester should apply for 



62 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

graduation during the first week of the fall semester. Although there is no] 
ceremony at that time, degree candidates who complete requirements will have 
the fact that they have completed all requirements for the degree indicated on 
their academic records. The diploma will be issued at the time of the spring 
commencement. 

Graduation application forms are available in the Office of Admissions and 
Records and may be obtained by mail by writing that office. 

A $15 graduation fee is established for all persons receiving degrees. The fee is 
payable at the time of application or the fee will be charged to the student's 
account. The fee does not cover the rental fee for the cap, gown, and hood, or the 
cost of the invitations. These items are ordered through the University Book Store 
in the Student Center and questions regarding them should be referred to the 
University Book Store. Doctoral students are also required to pay a fee of $55.00 to 
cover the cost of publication of the abstract and microfilming of the dissertation. 

Final, approved copies of research reports, theses, field studies, special project 
reports, and dissertations are due in the Graduate School office not later than 
three weeks before graduation. Doctoral students must also submit the micro- 
filming agreement form and the survey form of earned doctorates at the time the 
dissertation is submitted. 

Although attendance at commencement is not compulsory, students who wish 
to graduate in absentia must notify the Office of Admissions and Records in 
advance. This information is needed for seating arrangements and for mailing 
purposes. 

Posthumous Degrees 

A graduate degree may be awarded posthumously if, before the student's death, 
work for the degree had substantially been completed. This determination shall 
be the responsibility of the graduate dean in consultation with the administrative 
officers and faculty of the degree program in which the student had been enrolled. 

Release of Student Information and Issuance of Transcripts 

The University follows a policy for release of student information in compliance 
with federal regulations. More specific information may be obtained from the 
Office of Admissions and Records or from the Graduate School. 

A transcript of the student's official educational record is issued by the Office of 
Admissions and Records under the following conditions: a transcript is sent, 
issued, or released only upon a student's request or explicit permission, except 
that such permission is not required when the University faculty and administra- 
tive officials or other educational institutions request transcripts for official 
purposes. 

In addition, requests will be honored from a philanthropic organization 
financially supporting a student and from a recognized research organization 
conducting educational research provided the confidentiality of the transcript is 
protected. One transcript will be issued directly to a student upon request. The 
transcript will have the statement, Issued to the Student, stamped on its face. 
Transcripts will be sent without charge to recipients other than the student as 
requested by the student. A transcript will not be sent, issued, or released if a 
student owes money to the University as verified by the Bursar's office. 



2 



Academic 
Programs 



The official descriptions of programs leading to graduate degrees are outlined in 
this chapter. Admission and degree requirements which are listed in Chapter 1 
are minimum standards. The student should consult the specific program 
description for additional criteria imposed by the department. 

The titles of degree programs are listed below. The full descriptions, however, 
are arranged so that in cases where a department offers more than one program 
the various programs are grouped together under that department. All programs 
are cross-listed to aid in locating the official description. 

Several departments offer one or more concentrations as noted in Chapter 1 
within the major, the requirements for these concentrations may be found in the 
program description. 



Accountancy 

Administration of Justice 

Agribusiness Economics 

Agricultural Education and Mechanization 

Animal Science 

Anthropology 

Applied Linguistics 

Art 

Behavior Analysis and Therapy 

Biological Sciences 

Botany 

Business Administration 

Chemistry 

Cinema and Photography 

Communication Disorders and Sciences 

Community Development 

Computer Science 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Economics 

Education (Ph.D.) 

Educational Administration 

Educational Psychology 

Engineering 

English 

English as a Foreign Language 

Foreign Languages and Literatures 

French 

German 

Spanish 
Forestry 
Geography 
Geology 



Health Education 

Higher Education 

History 

Historical Studies (Ph.D.) 

Journalism 

Manufacturing Systems 

Mathematics 

Microbiology 

Mining Engineering 

Molecular Science 

Music 

Pharmacology 

Philosophy 

Physical Education 

Physics 

Physiology 

Plant and Soil Science 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Public Affairs 

Recreation 

Rehabilitation Administration 

Rehabilitation Counseling 

Social Work 

Sociology 

Special Education 

Speech Communication 

Statistics 

Telecommunications 

Theater 

Vocational Education Studies 

Zoology 



63 



64 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 



Accountancy 

The objective of the Master of Accountancy degree program is to provide an 
opportunity for students to achieve greater breadth and depth in the study of ac- 
countancy than is possible in the baccalaureate program. As preparation for a 
dynamic profession the curriculum fosters clear, logical, and analytical thought 
processes, effective oral and written communications, and life-long learning 
skills. Graduates pursue careers as professional accountants in public practice, in- 
dustry, financial institutions, government, and other not-for-profit organizations. 

Admission 

Applicants for admission to the program are required to: 

1 . Complete all requirements for admission to graduate study as specified by the 
Graduate School. 

2. Complete the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT). Information 
regarding the GMAT is available through: Graduate Management Admis- 
sion Test, Educational Testing Service, Box 966, Princeton, NJ 08540. 

The results of the test must be mailed directly to the associate dean for academic 
programs, College of Business and Administration. 

A non-refundable application fee of $15.00 must be submitted with any applica- 
tion to the accountancy program. Attach your check or money order, payable to 
Southern Illinois University, to the top of the application form. Do not send cash. 
Only checks or money orders payable to United States banks will be accepted. 

Admission to the program will be based on an undergraduate grade point 
average of 3.0 preferred; 2.5 minimum (4.0 = A) and an acceptable score on the 
GMAT. The minimum admission total of these two factors will conform to that 
recommended by the Master of Accountancy degree program advisory committee. 

Students whose native language is not English will be required to obtain an 
acceptable score (presently 550) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) examination before being admitted to the Master of Accountancy 
degree program. 

Notification of admission to the Master of Accountancy degree program is by 
letter from the director, Master of Accountancy degree program. This letter must 
be presented by the student prior to enrollment and registration in the program. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Accountancy degree program consists of at least 30 hours of 
acceptable course work. At least 15 hours must be in 500 level accounting courses. 
A student's program will be designed to insure coverage in the 5 areas of 
accountancy: financial accounting and accounting theory, management and cost 
accounting, computerized management information systems, financial and 
operational auditing, and taxation. A specific program will vary depending upon 
the student's career objectives and interests. 

Each student will be required to take the 5 core courses (15 hours) in 
accountancy, which expand coverage of the professional environment of account- 
ing beyond that required in the baccalaureate program. These courses include 
such topics as the organization of the profession, its ethics and responsibilities, 
and the impact of governmental and private sector organizations on current and 
emerging accounting issues. The 5 core courses in accountancy at the graduate 
level which must be completed by all students are: 

521 Emerging Issues in Accountancy 551 Accounting Information System 

531 Controllership and Policy Concepts 

541 Tax Concepts (or Equivalent) 561 Professional Dimensions of 

Accountancy 



Academic Programs Accountancy / 65 

A student who does not have any undergraduate work in accounting will be 
required first to make up deficiencies in the following areas: intermediate 
accounting, cost accounting, tax, accounting information systems, and auditing. 

A student must also complete the common body of knowledge requirements 
specified by the AACSB. A student who has graduated from an undergraduate 
accredited (AACSB) business school should have met this requirement. A student 
who has any deficiencies in any areas required by the AACSB will be required to 
make up these deficiencies before receiving the Master of Accountancy degree. 

Graduate accountancy courses from which a student may select to complete the 
15 hours beyond the accountancy core requirements are: 
522 Financial Accounting Theory 552 Accounting Information 

529 Seminar in Financial Accounting Systems II 

532 Controllership 562 Advanced Auditing Topics 

542 Tax Research and Procedure 571 Not-For-Profit Accounting 

543 Corporate Taxation 590 Seminar In Accounting 

544 Partnership Taxation 591 Independent Study 

545 Estate Planning 599 Thesis 

546 Seminar: Selected Tax Topics 601 Continuing Research 

After students have completed the accountancy hour requirements, they will 
select their remaining hours with the advice and consent of their advisers. Such 
courses will normally be selected from other graduate offerings in the College of 
Business and Administration. The full-time student who qualifies for the 
minimum program in terms of course work requirements normally may expect to 
complete the Master of Accountancy degree in one calendar year (two semesters 
and one summer session). The professional nature of this program requires that 
the courses, writing requirements, oral communications, special lectures, case 
studies, computer applications, colloquia, independent study, and research 
activities be presented in an integrated manner which stresses the program 
aspects at all times. This requires serious and extensive personal commitment to 
the program on the part of all candidates. 

In order to meet the graduate requirements the student must obtain a 3.0 grade 
point average (4.0 = A) and obtain a B or better in eighty percent of all graduate 
level courses taken after admission to the M.Acc. program. 

Areas of Emphasis 

A student who has an undergraduate degree in accounting or one who has 
satisfied the accounting common body of knowledge may arrange the additional 
15 hours of graduate courses beyond the core requirement to form a specific area 
of emphasis (taxation, information systems, managerial accounting and control, 
auditing, or not-for-profit accounting). Emphases are developed with the advice 
and consent of the student's adviser. 

3-2 Program 

A 3-2 program within the College of Business and Administration and the School 
of Accountancy is available to qualified students within the college, transfer 
students, and students majoring in areas other than business. The program 
permits a student to devote a part of the last 2 years of undergraduate study to 
fulfilling the foundation course requirements for business and accounting 
required for the Master of Accountancy degree. Upon completion of the require- 
ments for the bachelor's degree, the student may apply for admission to the 
Graduate School and the Master of Accountancy degree program. Students who 
successfully complete the program would thus have a 5 year program required for 
certification in some states. 

Concurrent J.D. and M.Acc. Program 

A student who has been admitted separately to the School of Law and to the 
M.Acc. program may apply for permission to study concurrently for both the 



66 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

Juris Doctor and Master of Accountancy degrees. This permission must be 
requested from both the School of Law and the School of Accountancy, ordinarily 
prior to entry into the second year curriculum of the School of Law. 

During the first academic year of concurrent work on the two degrees, the 
student enrolls only in the first-year law curriculum. In any subsequent academic 
term, the student may enroll for courses either in the School of Law or in the 
Master of Accountancy program. A student registered for both law and graduate 
courses in the same term must enroll for a minimum of 10 hours in law, and 12 
semester hours in total, in order to meet A.B.A. residence requirements and the 
academic requirements of the School of Law. 

Completion of the concurrent program requires that the student successfully 
complete 81 semester hours of law courses and 30 semester hours of courses that 
meet M.Acc. requirements. Up to 9 semester hours of the 30 may be School of Law 
courses which are also part of the 81 hours required for the Juris Doctor degree. 
School of Law courses counting for graduate credit toward the Master of 
Accountancy degree must be approved by the director of the Master of Ac- 
countancy program. Further, no more than 6 of the 30 semester credit hours may 
be taken in courses at the 400 level for graduate credit. 

Other Graduate Degrees Offered by the College 

The College of Business and Administration also offers the Master of Business 
Administration (M.B.A.) degree with specialization in finance, management, and 
marketing and the Doctor of Business Administration (D.B.A.) degree. Informa- 
tion relative to these degrees may be obtained from the associate dean for 
graduate programs, College of Business and Administration. 

Administration of Justice 

The Center for the Study of Crime, Delinquency, and Corrections enjoys both a 
national and international reputation for quality research and an outstanding 
educational program. With the many relationships with operating agencies, 
students are afforded unique opportunities to gain practical experience as an 
integrated part of their academic work. 

A number of opportunities for financial support are offered through the special 
programs and research projects conducted by individual faculty. In addition 
there are a number of fellowships offered, for which qualified students are 
encouraged to apply. 

The Center for the Study of Crime, Delinquency, and Corrections offers the 
Master of Science degree in the administration of justice. This curriculum, a 
multidisciplinary study of crime, its causes and settings, and systematic means of 
reacting to it, prepares students for careers in law enforcement, correctional 
services and administration, teaching, criminal justice research and planning, 
and private security management. Augmenting the academic program, research 
activities provide opportunity for graduate students to work with faculty 
members conducting research related in the administration of justice and in 
designing innovative projects in the field. Internship placement is included as a 
required component to insure a blending of practical experience with the 
academic training received by the student. 

Admission 

Full admission to the graduate program requires at least a 2.7 overall undergradu- 
ate average and acceptance by the faculty. Scores on the Graduate Record Exam- 
ination (aptitude portion only) or the Millers Analogies Test are also required. 

Students who do not have an undergraduate degree in administration of justice 
should have a minimum of 12 units in sociology, psychology, political science, or 



Academic Programs Administration of Justice / 67 

other social sciences. In cases where these criteria are lacking, additional selected 
undergraduate courses may be required for acceptance in this program. 

An introductory statistics course which covers at least analysis of variance and 
least squares estimation is required of all incoming graduate students. This 
requirement can be satisfied in 2 ways: a) approval by the graduate affairs 
committee of a course previously taken by the student; or b) successful completion 
of an approved statistics course during the student's graduate course work. 

Requirements 

Required Core Courses. All candidates for the Master of Science degree in the 
administration of justice are required to fulfill 15 hours of core courses. These 
consist of 2 didactic courses: 

AJ 500-3 Foundations of Criminal Justice 

AJ 516-3 Scope and Methods of Criminal Justice Inquiry 

In addition the student must take one research related course which provides 
skills that contribute to the generation of knowledge and more thorough 
utilization of existing information within the student's selected curricular 
emphasis. Appropriate courses should include quantitative methods such as AJ 
517, Seminar in Advanced Quantitative Techniques in Criminal Justice Re- 
search; ED PSYC 507 or POLS 503; as well as courses in such areas as accounting, 
legal research, or computer science. The course to meet this requirement must be 
approved by the student's graduate adviser. The statistics requirement for 
incoming graduate students will not satisfy this requirement. 

Two of the following 3 courses are also required. 

AJ 504-3 Criminological Theory 

AJ 562-3 Fundamental Legal Concepts in the Administration of Justice 

AJ 584-3 Administration and Management in Criminal Justice 

Curricular Emphases 

An area of emphasis will be composed of 12 credit hours in addition to the required 
core courses, of which 6 are required to be selected from among administration of 
justice offerings (except for the security administration emphasis). Certain 
Curricular Emphases are required. They include but are not limited to the 
following: 

Juvenile Delinquency. AJ 473-4, 474-3, 578-3; REHAB 452-3; SOC 562-4; and 
other courses approved the student's graduate adviser. 

Law Enforcement. AJ 403-3 to 6, 587-3, and other courses approved by the 
student's graduate adviser. 

Security Administration. BA 410-3, 440-3, 510-3, 543-3, 450-3; POLS 436-3, 444-3; 
IT 465-4; and other courses approved by the student's adviser. 

Criminal Justice Counseling. AJ 402-3, 472-3, 571-3, 578-3; PSYCH 414-4, 421-3, 
431-3, 440-3; REHAB 406-3; and other courses approved by the student's graduate 
adviser. 

Correctional Administration. AJ 485-3, 472-3, 588a-3; POLS 436-3, 441-3, 443-3, 
542-3, 543-3, 544-3, 545-3; REHAB 570-3, 573-2 to 3, 579-3; SOC 475-4, 539-4; and 
other courses approved by the student's graduate adviser. 

Research in Criminal Justice. AJ 517-3, 580-3, 588b-3, and other courses as 
appropriate to the student's area of research and approved by the student's 
graduate adviser. 
The Master of Science degree is thus broadly conceived so the student can seek 



68 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2\ 

an individualized emphasis appropriate either to continued graduate studies or a| 
particular field of work. 

Supervised Field Work. 

Supervised field work (internship) is required for all areas of emphasis. 
Students may take a total of 12 hours internship; however, only 6 hours may be 
counted toward the credit hours required for the master's degree. 
AJ 595A-3 to 6 Supervised Field Work (internship) graded S/ U 
AJ 595B-3 to 6 Supervised Field Work (internship) letter graded 

Students may successfully complete their graduate degree by pursuing either a 1 
thesis or non-thesis option. 

Thesis Option 

Students choosing the thesis option may take a total of 6 thesis credit hours ( AJ 
599-1 to 6); however, only 3 hours are counted towards the 36 credit hours required 
for the master's degree in this option. An oral defense of the student's thesis is 
required in this option. 

Non-Thesis Option 

Students choosing the non-thesis option may take a total of 6 individual research 
credit hours (AJ 591-1 to 6); however, only 3 hours are counted towards the degree 
requirements. Students in this option are also required to take an additional 3 
hours in their curriculum emphasis, making a total of 15 hours of electives. Thus, 
39 total credit hours are required in this option. Students pursuing this option are 
required to publicly defend their internship report and complete a written exami- 
nation in lieu of an oral defense of their thesis. 

Application forms for both the Graduate School and the Department of Admin- 
istration of Justice must be separately submitted. Upon request to the department, 
application forms from the Graduate School and the department will be sent. Ac- 
ceptance in the program is contingent on the final approval of the administration 
of justice graduate affairs committee after admission to the Graduate School. 

More detailed descriptions of the graduate program, as well as information on 
graduate assistantships and fellowships, may be obtained by writing: Graduate 
Secretary, Center for the Study of Crime, Delinquency, and Corrections, Southern 
Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 



Agribusiness Economics 



The Department of Agribusiness Economics offers graduate work leading to the 
Master of Science degree with a major in agribusiness economics. 

Students interested in agricultural economics at the doctoral level can be 
admitted to a program of study leading to the Ph.D. degree in economics. 

Application forms for admission to the Graduate School may be obtained from 
the Graduate School. For entering graduate students to be acceptable on an 
unconditional basis in the agribusiness economics Master of Science degree 
program, a minimal undergraduate grade point average of 2.7 is required. 
Students may be accepted on a conditional basis if the GPA is below 2.7. 

Inquiries for financial assistance and additional information would be directed 
to the chair of the Department of Agribusiness Economics, Southern Illinois 
University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 

Agribusiness Economics Concentration 

Emphasis may be attained in farm management, agricultural marketing, 
agricultural prices, agricultural policy, resource economics, and agribusiness 
management and finance. 



Academic Programs Agribusiness Economics / 69 

Undergraduate competence in economics and agricultural economics must be 
demonstrated. Students with an insufficient background in economics or 
agricultural economics may be admitted if remedial courses are taken. 

A minimum of 30 hours of graduate credit, including a thesis, is required for the 
Master of Science degree major in agribusiness economics with a concentration 
in agribusiness economics. At least 15 hours must be at the 500 level. 

Thirteen hours of agribusiness economics courses are required. This includes 
ABE 500a, 500b, 551, 552, and 581. In addition, the student's program is oriented 
toward either economics or business. The emphasis in economics is accomplished 
by completing six hours of graduate level courses in the Department of 
Economics. The emphasis in business is accomplished by completing six hours of 
graduate level courses in the College of Business and Administration. Such work 
completed as part of an undergraduate degree may be accepted in meeting the 
economics or business program requirements. This enables students with strong 
backgrounds in economics or business to take additional agribusiness economics 
courses or courses in their area of interest to meet the 30 hour M.S. degree 
requirement. Students are required to take 3-6 hours of thesis. 

Agricultural Services Concentration 

The agricultural services concentration is designed to permit students who are 
engaged in agriculture as extension workers, as soil conservation employees, in 
mechanization related industries, agricultural environmental service, etc., to 
expand their educational experiences in light of current and prospective employ- 
ment goals and opportunities. 

A minimum of 30 hours of graduate credit, including a thesis, is required for the 
Master of Science degree major in agribusiness economics with a concentration 
in agricultural services. At least 15 hours must be at the 500 level. Fifteen hours 
must be agricultural courses. Students are required to take 3-6 hours of thesis. 

Agricultural Education and Mechanization 

The Department of Agricultural Education and Mechanization offers graduate 
work leading to the Master of Science degree majoring in agricultural education 
and mechanization with concentrations in agricultural education, agricultural 
mechanization, and agricultural information. 

Students interested in agricultural education at the doctoral level can be 
admitted to a program of study leading to the Ph.D. in education. 

Application forms for admission to the Graduate School may be obtained from 
the Graduate School. For entering graduate students to be acceptable on an 
unconditional basis in the agricultural education and mechanization concentra- 
tions for the Master of Science degree program, a minimal undergraduate grade 
point average of 2.7 is required. Students may be accepted on a conditional basis if 
the GPA is below 2.7. 

Inquiries for financial assistance and additional information should be 
directed to the chair of the Department of Agricultural Education and Mechaniza- 
tion, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 

Agricultural Education Concentration 

The concentration in agricultural education is designed for instructors in 
secondary schools, for students preparing for employment at junior colleges, and 
for those desiring to continue their education by obtaining a Ph.D. degree. 

A minimum of 30 hours of graduate credit, including thesis or research hours is 
required for the M.S. degree major in agricultural education and mechanization 
with a concentration in agricultural education. At least 15 hours must be at the 
500 level. 



70 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2\ 

A minimum of 15 hours is required in agriculture (including agricultural L 
education), six hours of research methods or statistics, and six hours in education 
or community development. M.S. students usually take 46 hours of research or 
thesis, and complete the additional hours by taking courses in education or 
agriculture. 

Agricultural Mechanization Concentration 

The concentration in agricultural mechanization is designed to permit students 
interested in agricultural mechanization the opportunity to emphasize one or 
more of the following areas: (a) power and machinery operation and field testing, 
(b) product handling, processing, and storage, (c) farm equipment sales, service,' 
and product education, (d) machinery selection and efficient utilization in the 
farming operation, (e) agricultural structures— sales and construction supervi- 
sion, (f) agricultural electricity— service and consumer advisement, (g) conserva- 
tion of soil and water. Each of these areas offers application in agricultural 
environmental studies. 

A minimum of 30 hours of graduate credit, including thesis or research hours is 
required for the Master of Science degree with a major in agricultural education 
and mechanization with a concentration in agricultural mechanization. At least 
15 hours must be at the 500 level. 

Agricultural Information Concentration 

The agricultural information concentration is designed to provide graduate 
training for extension agents, agricultural communication professionals, product- 
education specialists, and others who are interested in agricultural information 
processing and transfer to a variety of non-student clientele. 

A minimum of 30 hours of graduate credit, including thesis or research hours is 
required for an M.S. degree with a major in agricultural education and 
mechanization with a concentration in agricultural information. At least 15 
hours must be at the 500 level. Fifteen hours must be agricultural courses. 
Students usually take 46 hours of research or thesis and complete the additional 
hours by taking courses in their concentration. 

Animal Science 

The Department of Animal Science, Food and Nutrition offers programs of study 
leading to the Master of Science degree with a major in animal science. Programs 
may be designed in the various disciplines of breeding, nutrition, reproduction 
physiology, growth and development or production, with emphasis on beef cattle! 
dairy cattle, horses, poultry, sheep, or swine. Supporting courses may be selected 
in applied science, chemistry, microbiology, physiology, zoology, behavioral 
science, agriculture, etc. 

Admission to programs administered by the Department of Animal Science, 
Food and Nutrition must be approved by the department. Application and 
reference forms will be provided upon request from the department. Applicants 
must have the registrar of each college previously attended send official 
transcripts directly to the Graduate School. 

Requirements 

Minimum requirements for the master's degree may be fulfilled by satisfactory 
completion of 30 semester hours of graduate credit, with a minimum of 15 hours in 
animal science. A maximum of two animal production related courses (409, 419, 
420, 430, 455, 465, 480, 485) may be counted for graduate credit. At least 8 hours of 
graduate credit must be earned outside the College of Agriculture. Minimal 
requirements for students entering the master's degree program are: (a) meet 



Academic Programs Animal Science / 71 

animal science undergraduate requirements; (b) minimal GPA of 2.7 ( A - 4.0); (c) 
CHEM 344 and 345 or organic chemistry equivalent. 

Students who do not meet the undergraduate requirements may correct these 
deficiencies while an unclassified student or with the consent of the department 
during graduate study. Students entering the animal science graduate program 
with a GPA below 2.70 are accepted on a conditional basis and must enroll in 8 
hours of structured courses at the 400500 level during their first semester and 
make a 3.0 GPA or be dropped from the program. 

Each student, whether in the thesis or non-thesis option, will have an advisory 
committee of at least four members including the departmental chair and at least 
one other member of the department. Each master's degree candidate must pass a 
comprehensive oral examination covering all graduate work including the thesis 
or research paper. 

Students interested in animal science at the doctoral level can be admitted to a 
program of study leading to the Ph.D. degree in physiology. The program, in the 
Department of Physiology, is adequately flexible to allow students to emphasize 
such areas as behavioral science, endocrinology, metabolism, microbiology, 
physiological genetics, or reproductive physiology. For admission requirements 
and program description the student should consult the physiology section in the 
Graduate Catalog. 

Information concerning admission policies, requisites for graduation, and 
availability of financial assistance for graduate study in animal science may be 
obtained from the Department of Animal Science, Food and Nutrition, Southern 
Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 



Anthropology 



The Department of Anthropology offers graduate programs leading to the Master 
of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Within the Master of Arts degree 
program, the department offers a concentration in conservation archaeology. 
Provided the student has been admitted to the Graduate School and meets its 
requirements, acceptance and continuation in the graduate program are at the 
discretion of the Department of Anthropology. 

The philosophy of the Department of Anthropology is to produce students with 
broad backgrounds in the major sub-fields of anthropology and expertise in 
particular specialty areas. Within this philosophy, and subject to the require- 
ments discussed below, the department offers a flexible program which will serve 
students with diverse needs and goals. 

Admission 

The applicant to the anthropology program must send a completed application 
for admission to graduate study and certified copies of all transcripts directly to 
the Graduate School, and must meet all Graduate School requirements for entry. 
In addition, the applicant must send a completed personal data sheet and a 
statement of academic and professional goals, and arrange for three letters of 
recommendation to be sent to the director of graduate studies of the Department 
of Anthropology. Applicants interested in financial aid must also submit an 
application for graduate assistantships and fellowships. All necessary forms will 
be provided to applicants by the department. No special program of previous 
work is required. Applicants with academic degrees in fields other than 
anthropology are encouraged to apply. 

Master's Degree Program 

In addition to the master's degree requirements specified in the Graduate Catalog, 
the following departmental requirements apply to all M.A. degree candidates: 



72 / Graduate Catalog Chapter . 

(1) Each student must complete the 5 core courses, ANTH 400 A, B, C, D, and 402 
with an average grade of B or higher, no more than one C, and no grade lowe 
than C. These courses should be taken by new M.A. students within the first \ 
terms, and must be completed by the end of the third term. Once the 5 core courses 
have been satisfactorily completed, performance in them together with ar 
evaluation of the student's overall academic record will serve as a basis foi 
departmental decision on retaining a student in the M.A. degree program. (2 
Each student must complete 1 or more regular graduate-level courses or seminars 
in each of 3 subdisciplines of the student's choice (from among archaeological 
linguistic, physical, sociocultural anthropology). (3) A further 6 hours of course 
work will be assigned by the student's committee after consultation with the 
student. These 6 hours may include up to 4 hours of graduate credit to meet tool 
requirements, and may not include more than 3 hours of independent study or 
thesis. No more than 3 hours of credit in ANTH 501, 590, and 599 (thesis) may be 
applied toward the Graduate School requirements of 30 hours of graduate course 
credit and 15 hours of 500-level credit. (4) Each student must demonstrate a 
reading competence in a relevant language foreign to the student (in the case of 
conservation archaeology specialists, this requirement is modified; see below). 

Students entering the program may petition to have previously taken courses j 
accepted for credit as equivalent to core courses in cases where the equivalence] 
can be documented. 

M.A. Degree Committee, Thesis, Research Paper. Each student in the M.A. 
degree program will consult with the director of graduate studies and relevant 
faculty members to select a three-person faculty committee, which will assume 
major responsibility for the student's advisement. At least 2 members of this 
committee, including the chair, must be from the Department of Anthropology, 
and the third member may be selected from outside the department. At least the 
chair should be chosen by the end of the first year, and the entire committee by the 
end of the third term. 

Under the direction of the M.A. degree committee, the student will complete a 
thesis and register for at least three hours of Anthropology 599 while doing so. A 
student may submit a published paper, or one accepted for publication in an 
approved professional journal, instead of a thesis, or may be authorized by the 
department to substitute a research paper for the thesis. Passing of a comprehen- 
sive examination on the student's entire program is a Graduate School require- 
ment. One properly bound copy of the thesis, research paper, or article must be 
deposited with the department before the degree is granted. 

CONSERVATION ARCHAEOLOGY 

The M.A. degree with a concentration in conservation archaeology is designed to 
meet the need for anthropologically trained archaeologists in the administration 
and direction of practical programs in conservation archaeology. 

Requirements for this concentration are identical to those for any M.A. degree 
in anthropology, with the following exceptions. (1) Students need not take the 
linguistics core course. (2) Statistics may be substituted for the foreign language 
requirement. However, any student entering the Ph.D. degree program after ob- 
taining an M.A. degree with this concentration must complete the linguistics core 
requirement and meet the foreign language requirement. (3) In conjunction with 
the course and distribution requirements for the M.A. degree, conservation archae- 
ology students are responsible for ANTH 406, 430A, 576, and 6 hours of 590. 

In addition to regular courses and seminars, the student is expected to engage 
in field and laboratory work. Archaeologists in the department and the Center for 
Archaeological Investigations involve conservation archaeology students in 
their contracts with private corporations and federal, state, and municipal 
governments. 



Academic Programs Anthropology / 73 

Additional information on the organization and requirements of the conserva- 
;ion archaeology concentration may be obtained from the coordinator for 
conservation archaeology, Department of Anthropology. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree Program 

Applicants to the Ph.D. degree program must complete the equivalent of the mas- 
k's degree and apply directly to the Graduate School for admission as a doctoral 
student. Three letters in support of the application must be forwarded to the 
lirector of graduate studies in the Department of Anthropology. Students must 
also supply a statement of goals for their programs and subsequent professional 
careers. The department will offer an accelerated entry option to students who 
lave been admitted at M.A. level and who are judged by the faculty of the 
lepartment to be prepared to begin research at the doctoral level. Such students 
nust complete at least one term in the M.A. degree program before being admitted 
it Ph.D. level, and must then meet all retention and exit requirements for the 
•egular doctoral option. The student need not submit the application materials 
•equired of regular applicants to the Ph.D. degree program as outlined above. 

No later than the spring semester of the first year after being admitted to the 
^h.D. degree program, students are given a written preliminary examination 
>ver their choice of 3 of the 4 major sub-fields of anthropology . Students who fail 
;he examination will be dropped from the program. Students who pass the prelimi- 
lary examination or who are exempted from it will form a faculty committee in 
consultation with the director of graduate studies and relevant members of the 
'acuity. The committee must include at least 5 members of the graduate faculty, at 
east 3 of whom (including the chair) must be from within the department, and at 
east 1 from outside: the normal case will be 4 from within and 1 additional. 

The requirements for the Ph.D. degree include the following. (1) Additional 
course work in anthropology and other fields within the student's interests. Of the 
24 hours of credit required to establish residency, 9 must be in 500-level 
anthropology courses other than 501, 585, and 597. The Ph.D. committee is 
expected to help formulate a study program that will usually involve at least one 
additional academic year of full-time course work beyond the M.A. degree. (2) 
Research tool requirements. These vary and will be determined between the 
student and the committee, subject to approval of the chair of the department. In 
all cases a certified reading knowledge of at least one foreign language will be 
required and at least one other tool. Other possible tools could include, for 
example, computer science, statistics, a second foreign language, or a combina- 
:ion of these or others. (3) Within a period not to exceed 3 years of full-time Ph.D. 
evel work, administration by the committee of a three-hour special oral examina- 
tion covering topical and geographical specialties. The student may not take the 
examination until 2 years of full-time graduate work have been completed, except 
by authorization from the dean of the Graduate School. In evaluating the 
examination, the committee may pass the student, fail the student but allow 
retaking of the examination at a later time (as either an oral or written 
examination, at the discretion of the committee) or fail the student and 
recommend dismissal from the program. If a student fails the examination and 
the committee allows reexamination, it must occur within one year of the first 
examination and only one retake is allowed. (4) Formal experience in teaching. 

Ph.D. Candidacy. After completion of the above requirements, the department 
will recommend a student to the Graduate School for candidacy. The candidate 
will design dissertation research in consultation with the committee and will 
undertake the research necessary to acquire the materials for the dissertation. 
Candidates must register for 24 hours of credit under ANTH 600. 

When a final draft of the dissertation has been accepted by the Ph.D. com- 
mittee, an oral defense of the dissertation and all supporting work will be held in 



74 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2\ 

accordance with Graduate School requirements. After a successful dissertation \ 
defense and completion of final revisions of the text, the student must submit two I 
copies of the dissertation to the Graduate School in accordance with its < 
guidelines, and a properly bound copy to the Department of Anthropology. 

Art ! 

In all of its graduate studio programs, the School of Art and Design strives to 
maintain a vital, creative ambience in which emerging artists with strong 
motivation may develop, through intensive studio practice and appropriate 
scholarly support, a clear, mature, and professional focus to their creative life. 
The core of any program is the in-depth studio practice of individual studio 
disciplines and frequent, sustained contact with working professional faculty 
and fellow students. This work is supported and extended through formal studio 
course work, studies in the history of art, and through access to the many 
resources and opportunities apparent in a large multi-purpose university. 

M.F.A. Degree Program Description 

The School of Art and Design offers graduate studies leading to the Master of 
Fine Arts degree with a major in art and offers studies supporting a teaching 
specialty in art for the Master of Science in Education degree with a major in 
secondary education. The student is expected to select an area of emphasis (studio 
or art education), and a program will be planned in consultation with the major 
professor in that area. 

Admission 

An undergraduate degree in art or art education, or the equivalent in course work 
or experience if the undergraduate degree is in another discipline, is required for 
admission into the Master of Fine Arts degree program. The student must also 
submit transcripts of all previous undergraduate work, present slides or a 
portfolio of creative work, and may submit letters of recommendation. 

In most cases an undergraduate degree in art education is required for 
admission into the program constituting a teaching specialty in art for the 
Master of Science in Education degree majoring in secondary education. Any 
exception to these requirements must be approved by the faculty in the studio or 
art education fields and by the director of the School of Art and Design. 

M.F.A. Degree 

A minimum of 60 semester credit hours is required for the Master of Fine Arts de- 
gree with a major in art. All hours that are to count toward graduation must have 
the approval of the student's major adviser in the studio area of emphasis. 
Students may emphasize the following areas in studio: drawing, painting, print- 
making, sculpture/foundry, ceramics/glass, metalsmithing/blacksmithing, and 
fibers/ weaving. The length of time required to complete a 60-semester-hour pro- 
gram is usually 5-6 semesters or 3 academic years. Most graduate students are in 
residence for at least 4 semesters. Programs of residency must have the approval 
of the student's major adviser. Required hours are distributed as follows: 26 hours 
in the primary studio emphasis, 12 hours in art history or related subjects, 6 hours 
in thesis or terminal project work, and 16 hours of elective study of which 9 hours 
must be in studio disciplines. The remaining hours may be elected from any area 
within the School of Art and Design or in the University at large. 

In addition to the completion of course work, all candidates for the M.F.A. 
degree must, during the last semester of academic work, present a graduate 
exhibition, present a terminal project or a written thesis, and pass an oral 
examination. The terminal project is a creative activity presented in lieu of the 



Academic Programs Art / 75 

written thesis, and in practice, the graduate exhibition is considered to satisfy the 
terminal project requirement. 

Graduate education in the studio areas of emphasis is expensive, and because 
of the individual nature of creative work, it is virtually impossible to predict the 
exact cost for each student. The School of Art and Design provides the faculty, 
and the studio and shop facilities that are necessary to the programs offered, but 
all other costs, especially materials, that are considered necessary to the 
successful completion of a graduate program are borne by the student. 

Art as a Teaching Specialty 

The Master of Science in Education degree with a major in secondary education 
with a teaching emphasis in art requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of 
graduate credit. Two art education program options are available: (1) the research 
option for those interested in research, supervision, or eventual doctoral studies, 
and (2) the teacher-studio option for improving teaching and studio skills. 

The research option requires 13 hours in education, 1 1 hours in art education, 3 
hours of thesis (or research paper) with the remaining hours for art electives. The 
teacher-studio option requires 13 hours in education, 6 hours in art education, 3 
hours for thesis (or research paper) with the remaining hours for art electives. All 
hours that are counted toward graduation and election of either a thesis project or 
a research paper must have the approval of the art education graduate adviser. 

Behavior Analysis and Therapy 

(See Rehabilitation Institute for program description.) 



Biological Sciences 



A student may pursue a program of studies leading to the Master of Science 
degree majoring in biological sciences. 

Requirements for Admission 

1. Bachelor's degree with a major in a natural science department. 

2. Admission to the Graduate School. 

3. Approval of the director, graduate program in biological sciences. 

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree Major in Biological 
Sciences 

The student must complete 40 hours of graduate courses in the biological sciences. 
Special courses required of any student are to be determined by consultation 
between the student and the program committee, with the following provisions: 

1. No more than 24 hours of credit in any one department may be used for the 
degree. 

2. No minor is required. 

3. Have at least 15 hours of credit in 500 level courses. These may not include 
more than 3 hours for special problems, 3 hours for seminars, and 2 hours for 
readings. 

4. Complete at least one 400or 500-level laboratory course in 3 of the depart- 
ments of the biological sciences. 

5. Submit a research paper. 

6. Attend, for credit, at least 1 semester of seminar in 3 of the departments of the 
biological sciences. 



76 Graduate Catalog Chapter 1 

Advisement 

Guidance of students shall be by a program committee of 3 members, 1 from eacl 
of the biological science programs involved, or other departments at t\n\ 
discretion of the program committee. The program director will serve as ar< 
ex-officio member. 

Graduate work may be taken in the Departments of Botany, Microbiology 
Physiology, and Zoology to obtain a Master of Science degree major in biologica i 
sciences in the College of Science. 

Additional information may be obtained from: Director of the Graduate Pro 
gram in Biological Sciences, Life Science II, Room 148, Southern Illinois Univer 
sity at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 

Botany 

The Department of Botany offers a well-balanced graduate program leading to 
the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Science in biological 
sciences, Master of Science in Education in biological sciences, and the Doctor of' 
Philosophy. 

The areas of emphasis are those of the broadly diversified faculty which charac- 
terizes the department and faculty members of other departments who participate 
in joint programs. All areas of botany are represented. The departmental master's 
programs and the doctoral program are based on a combination of course work 
and research. An advisory committee of faculty members from botany and other 
selected departments is responsible for the degree program of the individual stu- 
dent. At some stage in their overall programs, all students granted a degree will 
have completed training equivalent to 1 or more courses in each of 6 areas of bo- 
tany (morphology, anatomy, taxonomy, genetics, plant physiology, and ecology). 

The Department of Botany is housed in modern facilities in the Life Science II 
building. Each faculty member provides laboratory facilities for the students as 
part of the research program, and the department provides centralized facilities, 
including a growth chamber suite, herbarium, greenhouse complex, and field 
stations. Several University-owned field station facilities are located in southern 
Illinois, and University-affiliated field programs are carried out in the British 
Virgin Islands. Excellent cooperative research arrangements are available with 
other departments for such activities as electron microscopy, chemical analyses, 
and research photography. 

A distinguishing feature of the Department of Botany is its congenial 
atmosphere. Individuals are encouraged to develop their own programs and 
research activities within the scope of available resources or those which can 
reasonably be attained. The first master's degree was granted in 1948, and the 
first Ph.D. degree in 1965. All areas of botany have been represented in the course 
of the department's history, with some shifts in emphasis according to both 
changing interests within the scientific disciplines and changes in the faculty 
and student population. 

Graduate degrees in botany will be awarded to students in recognition of their 
ability to do independent research as evidenced by the acceptance of a thesis or 
dissertation and by the demonstration of competent scholastic ability. Teaching 
experience in undergraduate courses is expected as part of the Ph.D. degree 
program. 

Admission 

Students must be admitted to the Graduate School before they can be considered 
by the department. All applications to the department must include three letters 
of recommendation, application form, GRE scores including verbal, quantitative, 



Academic Programs Botany / 77 

and advanced biological, and may include a financial assistance form. Criteria 
for admission include grade point average, letters of recommendation, and 
availability of faculty, space, and facilities. 

Applicants must have completed a course (or equivalent) in each of the 
following areas (these may be completed concurrently with work toward the 
degree): (a.) general botany, (b.) plant diversity (survey of the plant kingdom), (c.) 
plant physiology, (d.) plant taxonomy, (e.) ecology, (f.) genetics, (g.) additional 
requirements for the B.A. degree as specified by the College of Science in the 
current Undergraduate Catalog of SIUC. 

A student deficient in 3 or fewer of these areas (a through g) must be admitted 
with conditional standing. A student admitted with conditional standing must 
make up all deficiencies within the first academic year, and until such deficiencies 
are completed, no more than 10 academic units can be accrued toward the degree. 
Students lacking 4 or more of these areas must register as unclassified. 

All deficiencies must be made up through the taking of pertinent undergraduate 
courses for credit with a grade of on B off or better in each. 

Students desiring financial assistance should note that the deadlines for 
fellowship and assistantship applications are February 1 and March 1, respec- 
tively. Application forms are available from the director of graduate studies in the 
Department of Botany. 

Advisement 

Following admission to the department and before registration for course work, 
the student must consult a staff member representing the field of major interest 
or, if this is unknown, the director of graduate studies of the department, for 
assistance in planning first registration. At every registration, deficiencies and 
specific departmental requirements must be considered first. Any changes in 
registration must be approved by the student's adviser. 

Within the first 6 months of admission into the departmental program, the 
student must select a faculty member who is willing to serve as the major adviser. 
The major adviser in consultation with the student, the director of graduate 
studies, and the departmental executive officer will then select an advisory 
committee with the major adviser as chair. For the master's degree program, a 
minimum of 3 people shall make up the advisory committee. At least half of the 
committee must be comprised of members of the botany faculty. The advisory 
committee for the Ph.D. degree program will be composed of at least 5 people, 3 of 
which must be botanists and 1 which must be from outside the department. 

Following establishment of the advisory committee and before advance 
registration for the third term, the student will meet with the committee to discuss 
the program of courses for the degree and plans for research. In this regard, the 
committee is empowered to require work in fields with which the student's 
interests are allied. The advisory committee will advise the student on the 
selection of readings on general and historical topics of importance which may 
not be encountered in formal courses. Copies of the approved program of courses 
and the plans for research must be placed in the departmental files. 

Research and Training Assignments. Research is required of each student in the 
program. In addition, each term the student must be engaged in a training 
assignment which supplements formal course work by professional activities 
such as research or teaching. The assignment varies according to the needs, 
professional goals, and competencies of the student, and increases in responsibil- 
ity as the student progresses. The assignments require from 10 to 20 hours of 
service per week. 

Academic Retention 

The general regulations of the Graduate School with respect to academic retention 



78 Graduate Catalog Chapter it 

shall be followed. In addition, no course in which the grade is below on C off shal j 
count toward the degree or fulfillment of any requirement, but the grade will bi( 
included in the grade point average. No more than five hours of on C off work ir. 
graduate courses will count toward the degree. 

All students are subject to regular review by the department's graduate policies^ 
committee. Those not attaining the minimum acceptable academic standards on 
who in any way fail to meet any other scheduled requirements or standards will I 
be dropped as majors. 

Course Requirements 

All master's degree students must earn a minimum of 2 hours credit in botany 
seminars (BOT 580 or BOT 589), at least 1 of which must be in general seminar 
(BOT 580). All Ph.D. students must earn 2 hours credit in botany seminar (BOT 
580 or BOT 589) every year of residence until admitted to candidacy and at least 
one credit each year must be in general seminar (BOT 580). It is strongly 
recommended that the student enroll in general seminars dealing with subjects 
other than the general area of emphasis being pursued. Attendance in general 
seminar (with or without credit) during every semester is strongly recommended. 
Those students who have not already taken a course in plant anatomy must 
include BOT 400-4 Plant Anatomy in their graduate degree program. 

Appeals 

Appeals for variations from the departmental graduate program must be 
presented in writing to the botany graduate faculty meeting as a committee of the 
whole. Appeals must receive approval from a majority of the total botany 
graduate faculty. 

Appeals for changes in the student's graduate advisory committee or changes 
in the original program must be approved in the following order: (1) approval 
from adviser, (2) approval from remaining members of the student's advisory 
committee. 

Student appeals for change of major adviser must be presented in writing to the 
botany graduate faculty meeting as a committee of the whole. Appeals must I 
receive approval from a majority of the total botany graduate faculty. 

The Master's Degree 

A minimum of 30 hours of graduate credit is required beyond the bachelor's de- 
gree, including no less than 22 hours of botany courses, 9 of which may be indi- 
vidualized instruction courses, including up to 3 (minimum of 2) hours of seminar, 
and up to 6 (minimum of 3) hours of thesis. A graduate minor of at least 10 gradu- 
ate hours may or may not be required; this is to be determined by the student and 
the advisory committee. The M.A. degree requires an additional minimum of 
passing ETS examination in a foreign language or taking the appropriate 388 
and 488 course and earning a grade of on B off or better in each. At the time of 
completion of the thesis, the student must schedule a public presentation of the 
thesis material (this is in addition to the comprehensive examination). 

The Ph.D. Degree 

Courses. The major shall consist of a minimum of 20 semester hours at the 400 
and 500 levels in formal botany course work beyond the master's degree but ex- 
cludes seminar, readings, research, dissertation, and research tool requirements. 

The decision as to whether a minor shall or shall not be required shall be left to 
the student's advisory committee. If the committee requires a minor, it will 
determine the specifications of that minor. 

The student shall demonstrate knowledge in each of the 2 foreign languages by 
passing an Educational Testing Service examination or taking the appropriate 
388 and 488 course and earning a grade of on B off or better in each. The ETS 



Academic Programs Botany / 79 

passing level for French and German shall be 465 and the ETS passing level for 
Russian and Spanish shall be 440. Proficiency in (a) statistics, (b) computer 
programming, or (c) scientific photography and scientific illustration may be 
required in lieu of one of the languages or in addition to the languages if the 
advisory committee so rules. A research tool to be substituted for one language 
must be completed utilizing formal courses consisting of at least 2 terms (at least 6 
hours) with an average grade of B or better. Courses used to satisfy the require- 
ment shall not be applied toward the total number of hours required for the degree. 

Preliminary Examination. The student's advisory committee shall serve as the 
preliminary examination committee and shall prepare and administer the exam- 
ination which will be both written and oral. 

The written examination will be taken first and will cover the candidates' 
knowledge of botany and related fields and their history, the students' accom- 
plishments in the course of study outlined, and the students' progress in the 
jspecial field. The candidates will be expected to show an understanding of the 
iapplication of their formal work to their field of research. The written examina- 
tion will consist of three parts: the first will include questions in the students' 
Ispecial field of interest, the second will include questions testing basic knowledge 
jin botany, and the third will include questions in the students' outside minor field 
lor secondary concentration within botany. 

The entire written examination is to last no longer than 5 days and each part is 
ito last no longer than 8 hours. The student must pass all parts of the written to 
jproceed to the oral examination. Pass means sufficient information is evident to 
permit the student to proceed to the oral part of the examination. 

In order to pass the written examination, the vote of the advisory committee 
will determine (by majority vote) whether the student will be allowed to continue 
(in the program and whether the student will be required to retake part or all of the 
'written examination. Upon failing the written examination, the student may not 
Iretake the examination in the same academic term. In any event, the student 
imust pass the written examination by the third attempt in order to continue in the 
doctoral program. 

The oral examination will be taken no sooner than 10 days nor later than 30 
days following the passing of the written examination. The examination shall 
last at least 2 hours and no more than 4 hours and should be scheduled to allow 
attendance of a maximum number of the botany graduate faculty and all of the 
advisory committee members. The student's answers to the written examination 
will be made available to the graduate faculty in botany (upon request) prior to 
the oral part of the preliminary examination. All attending graduate faculty 
members will be given the opportunity to express their opinion on the examina- 
tion. Passage of the oral examination must be by unanimous vote of the advisory 
committee and may have conditions. 

Final Examination. The final examination will be oral. It shall be held at least 1 
month before graduation and shall last for no more than 3 hours. It is to cover the 
dissertation and related subject matter. The advisory committee must notify the 
graduate adviser of its recommendation for the date of the final examination at 
least 2 weeks before the examination. 

Passage of the final oral examination should be construed to mean that there be 
no more than 1 dissenting vote of the advisory committee. In the event of failure, a 
second examination may be held as directed by the advisory committee. 

Business Administration 

The graduate faculty, consisting of members of the School of Accountancy and the 



80 Graduate Catalog Chapter Zl 

Departments of Finance, Management, and Marketing, offers graduate wortj 
leading to the Master of Business Administration degree, the Master of Ac! 
countancy degree, and the Doctor of Business Administration degree. 

To support the graduate programs, the College of Business and Administration j 
has a modern computer laboratory equipped with microcomputers and terminals < 
for mainframe access. That laboratory is staffed with graduate assistants and has j 
up-to-date spreadsheet and dBase software. In addition, the Computing Affairs) 
Division on-campus maintains 2 additional laboratories which also contain 
microcomputers, terminals for mainframe access, and up-to-date-software. 

Master of Business Administration 

The basic objectives of the Master of Business and Administration (M.B.A.) 
degree program are first, the development of professional managers and! 
executives to serve the needs of business, government, and other organizations J 
and second, the preparation of students interested in doctoral study. The program 
is designed to develop the individual's ability to comprehend internal and 
external social, legal, political, and economic forces as they affect the decision- 
making process within the organization. The curriculum enhances the student's j 
professional and academic growth by: 

Developing critical thinking skills through in-depth analysis of business 
problems. 

Strengthening communication skills through class discussions, written assign- 
ments, and oral presentations. 

Increasing organizational and leadership skills through team projects. 

Broadening comprehension of the dynamics of the business environment 
through emphasis on the role of environmental variables affecting organiza- 
tional performance. 

Emphasizing the global nature of today's business environment and its impact 
on decision making. 

Enhancing decision making skills in complex environments through the use of 
quantitative techniques, computer simulations, database management, and 
business games. 

Bridging the gap between the theoretical and practical aspects of business 
through case analysis and projects with local businesses. 

Providing professional development and networking opportunities through 1 
business-to-student seminars and speaker programs sponsored by the Graduate 
Business Association. 

The program has been structured with flexibility so as to serve both holders of 
baccalaureate degrees in business administration and those who hold degrees in 
other disciplines. The M.B.A. program is accredited by the American Assembly of 
Collegiate Schools of Business. 

Admission Requirements 

Prospective degree candidates are expected to demonstrate a readiness for 
graduate study and an aptitude for successful performance in graduate level work 
in business administration. Admission to the program is based on the applicant's 
undergraduate record, a satisfactory score on the Graduate Management 
Admission Test, and other evidence pertaining to ability to perform well in 
graduate work in business administration. Special circumstances and work 
experience may be considered if presented. More specifically, the applicant must: 

1. Meet all admission requirements set forth by the Graduate School. These 
requirements are outlined elsewhere in the catalog. 

2. Complete the Graduate Management Admission Test and have the results of 
the test mailed directly to graduate programs, College of Business and 
Administration. 

Information regarding this test is available by writing to: Graduate Management 



Academic Programs Business Administration / 81 

Admission Test, Educational Testing Service, PO Box 6103, Princeton, NJ 08541- 
6103 USA. 

To apply, one needs to complete and submit a Graduate School application and 
an M.B.A. Program application. Application materials may be obtained from: 
Graduate Programs, College of Business and Administration, Southern Illinois 
University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 

A non-refundable application fee of $15.00 must be submitted with any applica- 
tion to the M.B.A. or D.B. A. program. Attach your check or money order, payable 
to Southern Illinois University, to the top of the application form. Do no send 
cash. Only checks or money orders payable to United States banks will be 
accepted. 

Application Deadlines 

Fall Spring Summer 

Assistant Applicants March 15 September 15 February 15 

[Fellowship Applicants Nov. 15 of previous year (fall awards only) 
Other U.S. Applicants June 15 November 15 April 15 

Other International 
Applicants April 15 September 15 February 15 

Degree Requirements 

A minimum of 36 semester hours of course work is required. Students must earn a 
3.0 grade point average (4.0 = A) and a B or better in eighty percent of all graduate 
level course work beyond the foundation. Candidates who receive permission to 
write a thesis must complete a minimum of 33 semester hours of course work plus 
an acceptable thesis, for which 6 semester hours of credit are assigned. 

Students who enter the M.B.A. degree program without the necessary founda- 
tion courses in the common body of knowledge of business and administration as 
specified by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business must 
complete them in a satisfactory manner. These students may be required to 
complete up to 29 semester hours of acceptable course work to satisfy this 
requirement. In addition, students must satisfy a computer ability requirement 
mcompassing spreadsheet and database programs. 

For courses taken to be evaluated as possible equivalents to M.B.A. foundation 
courses at SIUC, one needs to have earned a grade of C or higher in each and sup- 
ply the M.B.A. academic adviser with the course syllabus for each course to be 
evaluated. Where syllabi are not available, a course catalog, or catalogs as appro- 
priate, for the years the courses were completed may be presented. Transcripts may 
lot be substituted for syllabi/catalog descriptions. This supporting documenta- 
tion needs to be provided to the M.B.A. academic adviser at least 2 weeks in ad- 
/ance of one's first M.B.A. advisement appointment and subsequent registration. 

The M.B.A. degree program course work to be taken beyond the foundation 
courses is determined on an individual basis in conference with the M.B.A. 
urogram academic adviser. All core and elective requirements must be met. For 
lp-to-date information regarding the core and elective courses of the M.B.A. 
urogram, contact: Graduate Programs, COBA, Southern Illinois University at 
Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 

Students may choose to take all of their electives in a particular area such as 
iccounting, finance, management, or marketing in fulfilling their electives, or, 
ilternatively, take electives across 2 or more areas. Students may request ap- 
proval to take one or more substantive electives outside of business that would 
provide training unavailable through business courses and would facilitate the 
jtudent meeting career goals. 

Fransfer Credit 



82 Graduate Catalog Chapter 

dent may receive transfer credit for up to 6 semester hours of equivalent cours ^ 
work if the courses were taken at an AACSB accredited graduate school. 

A graduate student who has 6 hours or less of course work remaining in thei I 
program may petition the master's programs committee for permission t<i 
complete up to 6 hours of equivalent course work at another AACSB accreditee! 
graduate school. The determination of equivalency is to be made by the director o i 
the master of business administration program. 

Course work from other than AACSB accredited graduate schools must b» 
approved by the master's programs committee. 

Academic Retention 

In addition to the retention policies of the Graduate School, if a student receives i 
third grade of C or lower in any course designated as a foundation course, tha 
student will be automatically suspended from the program. Similarly, if a studen 
receives a third grade of C or lower in any core or elective course not designated as 
a foundation course, that student will be automatically suspended from th( 
program. 

If, at the end of any semester or session, for any reason, a student has c 
outstanding recorded grades of Inc or Def remaining on the grade record, thai 
student will not be deemed to be making normal progress and will be placed or 
probationary status. If the student has 3 outstanding grades of Inc or De) 
remaining on record at the end of the next semester or session, the student will bt 
suspended from the program. The definitions of Inc and Def may be found in the 
Graduate Catalog. 

A student who is to receive a grade of Inc in a course is to meet with thtJ 
instructor to work out a time and conditions for completion of the course within 
policy guidelines. Typically, a Notification of Incomplete Grade Agreement form; 
is completed and the student is provided with a copy. 

J.D./M.B.A. Concurrent Degree Program 

The College of Business and Administration (COBA) and the School of Law. 
together, offer the J.D./M.B.A. concurrent degree program. The J.D. degree alonei 
requires completion of 90 semester hours of course work and the M.B.A. degree* 
alone requires completion of 36 semester hours of course work; however, in the' 
J.D./M.B.A. concurrent degree program the School of Law accepts 9 semester 
hours of business course work towards meeting the J.D. semester hour require- 
ment and COBA accepts 9 semester hours of law towards meeting the M.B.A. 
semester hour requirement. The end result is that the concurrent degree program 
actually entails completion of 81 semester hours of law courses and 27 semester 
hours of business courses, with an 18 semester hours savings over pursuing both 
degrees separately outside of the J.D./M.B.A. concurrent degree program. 

A student interested in enrolling in the J.D./M.B.A. concurrent degree program 
must apply both to the graduate program in law (which involves a law school 
application) and to the graduate program in business (which involves a Graduate 
School application and an M.B.A. program application) and be accepted by each 
program. The student may then request permission to pursue the concurrent 
degree program. This request must be made both to COBA and the School of Law 
and should be made prior to commencing the second-year law curriculum. 

Doctor of Business Administration 

The Doctor of Business Administration (D.B.A.) degree program is designed to 
prepare individuals for faculty research and teaching positions in academic 
institutions and for high-level administrative or staff positions in business, 
government, and other organizations. Candidates for the D.B.A. degree must 
demonstrate in-depth knowledge of business and administration and high 
potential to undertake significant research. 



Academic Programs Business Administration / 83 

Admission Requirements 

To be eligible for admission, students must have completed a master's degree or 
its equivalent. A grade point average in all graduate level work of 3.5 ( A - 4.0) is 
preferred, but not less than 3.33 is permitted for admission. 

To apply to the D.B. A. program, each applicant is required to take the Graduate 
Management Admission Test (of the Educational Testing Service) and have an 
official report of these scores sent to SIUC. The applicant needs to complete and 
submit a Graduate School application and a D.B. A. program application. Appli- 
cation materials may be obtained from: Graduate Programs, COBA, Southern 
Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 

A non-refundable application fee of $15.00 must be submitted with any applica- 
tion to the D.B.A. program. Attach your check or money order, payable to South- 
ern Illinois University, to the top of the application form. Do not send cash. Only 
checks or money orders payable to United States banks will be accepted. 

Degree Requirements 

Students in the program must complete course work in certain foundation areas. 

A student who has completed successfully the requirements for the M.B.A. degree 

from an AACSB-accredited graduate business program will have met the 

foundation requirements. A student with a M.Acc. from an AACSB-accredited 

program will be expected to take some courses, to be determined by the student's 

advisory committee, outside the accounting area. All other students will either 

complete the following courses or demonstrate proficiency based on prior 

academic work. 

BA 410-3 Financial Accounting 

BA 526-3 Managerial Economics 

BA 451-3 Methods of Quantitative Analysis 

EPSY 506-4 Inferential Statistics 

and 5 courses from any 3 of the following 4 areas: 

a. BA 430, BA 510, BA 530 

b. BA 450, BA 550, BA 598 

c. BA 440, BA 540, BA 598 

d. BA 452, BA 520, BA 560 

In addition, the student must demonstrate proficiency in computer program- 
ming. 

The student must complete a prescribed program of doctoral course work 
beyond the foundation work. A minimum of 60 semester hours is required: 12-18 
hours in the major field; 6-12 hours in a support field; 6-12 hours of research tools; 
and 24 hours of dissertation credit. Additional hours may be required as 
prescribed by the student's advisory committee. 

It is expected that all doctoral course work will be completed at SIUC. In 
exceptional cases, the advisory committee may consider petitions to accept credit, 
not to exceed 6 hours, for doctoral course work done at other institutions. 

In addition to the retention policy of the Graduate School, for the D.B.A. 
program the third grade below B or the second grade below C in any graduate 
level course not designated as a foundation course will result in automatic 
dismissal from the D.B.A. program without any right of appeal. 

Advisement 

For each student an advisory committee is constituted and approved according to 
procedures described in the D.B.A. policies and procedures document of the 
COBA. The advisory committee is responsible for developing and approving a 
program of study for the student which meets all requirements of the Graduate 
School and the D.B.A. program. The specific program is designed in terms of the 
individual student's career objectives. 



84 / Graduate Catalog Chapter ij 

Preliminary Examinations 

The preliminary examination is designed to determine the breadth and depth olj 
the student's knowledge within the discipline. A minimum of 2 years of study (4£ 
semester hours) beyond the baccalaureate must be completed before the student h\ 
permitted to sit for the preliminary examination, and the student must be in the 
last semester of all scheduled course work. 

The preliminary examination has a written and oral portion. After successful 
completion of the written segment, the student will sit for the oral portion of the 
preliminary examination. Students who pass the oral portion will be recom- 
mended for candidacy when the residency and research tool requirements have 
been met. Students who fail the preliminary examination, or any part thereof; 
may petition to retake the examination or any part thereof. 

Specific conditions may be stipulated before the student can sit for the exami- 
nation a second time. Those who fail the preliminary examination a second time 
will be dismissed from the program. 

Dissertation 

Upon admission to candidacy, a dissertation committee is constituted and ap-i 
proved according to procedures described in the D.B.A. policies and procedures 
document of the COB A. The student will prepare a written proposal and submit it 
to the dissertation committee and make an oral presentation of the dissertation 
proposal. On acceptance of the written and oral presentation of the dissertation 
proposal by the dissertation committee, the student will proceed with further work- 
on the dissertation topic. The dissertation committee will monitor the student's 
progress in completing the dissertation. A final oral examination will be admin- 
istered by the dissertation committee and will cover the subject of the dissertation 
and other matters related to the discipline. Upon successful completion of thet 
final oral examination, the candidate will be recommended for the D.B.A. degree. 

Other Graduate Degrees Offered by COBA 

The college also offers the Master of Accountancy (M.Acc.) degree. In addition,; 
jointly with the School of Law the college offers the J.D./M.Acc. concurrent! 
degree program. The reader is referred to the accountancy section of this catalog; 
for details regarding the M.Acc. and J.D./M.Acc. programs. 

For More Information 

Additional information regarding the M.B.A. degree program or D.B.A. degree 
program may be obtained by contacting the Office of Student Affairs, COBA, 
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. Additional 
information regarding the M.Acc. degree program may be obtained by contacting 
the School of Accountancy in the College of Business and Administration. 

Center for the Study of Crime, Delinquency, and 
Corrections 

(See Administration of Justice.) 

Chemistry and Biochemistry 

Programs leading to the Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Science degrees may 
be undertaken in the general areas of analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical 
chemistry, and in biochemistry and molecular biology. 



Academic Programs Chemistry and Biochemistry / 85 

The doctoral degree in chemistry is a research degree. To be awarded this 
degree, the student must demonstrate to the satisfaction of the graduate 
committee the ability to conduct original and independent research within some 
area of chemistry and must, in fact, make an original contribution to the science. 
The master's degree also requires a research project, but with less emphasis on 
originality and independence. 

Admission 

Each student must have a baccalaureate degree in one of the sciences, mathemat- 
ics, or engineering to be considered for admission to an advanced degree program. 
An undergraduate major in chemistry, with the following courses, is desirable: 

(1) One year of organic chemistry (lecture and laboratory). 

(2) One year of calculus-based physical chemistry (lecture and laboratory). 

(3) One year of analytical chemistry including instrumental analysis. 
Prospective students wishing to pursue the degree in the area of biochemistry 

and molecular biology are expected to have completed courses in organic 
chemistry, calculus-based physical chemistry, physics, and biology. 

Students with deficiencies in any area may be admitted, but such deficiencies 
may restrict the research areas available to the student and lead to requirements 
for additional courses during graduate study. 

Prospective students are encouraged to contact faculty in areas of the students' 
research interest. 

Applicants are strongly encouraged to submit Graduate Record Examination 
j(GRE) general test scores. Tests from one of the GRE subject test areas (chemistry 
lor biology for students interested in biochemistry and molecular biology) are also 
encouraged. 

Foreign students whose native language is not English will be required to 
jobtain at least 550 on the Test for English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 

{Placement Examinations. One week before the beginning of classes, each 
admitted student will be given a written examination (ACS standard or 
equivalent examination) in the division of chemistry in which the student 
proposes to work. Students who are undecided about a division or who wish to 
Iwork in a cross-divisional area should take examinations in 2 or more divisions. 
I The results of these examinations are used to place the student in appropriate 
courses and to advise the student regarding any deficiencies to be corrected. 

Formal Course Work Requirement. All graduate students must satisfy core course 
requirements of the major division. Students in the doctoral program must take 
for credit at least 6 semester hours of formal 500-level course work outside the ma- 
jor division. At least 3 of these 6 hours must be within the department. Students in 
|he master's program must take for credit at least 3 semester hours of formal 500- 
level course work outside the major field. Certain 400-level courses within or with- 
out the department may be used to meet this requirement. Students may major in 
hross-divisional areas. In such cases the formal course work requirement will be 
Jmodified by agreement of the student's committee and the graduate adviser. 

Students in the doctoral program must present 3 departmental seminars for 
:redit (CHEM 595). These include one based on a literature review, the second on 
the topic of an original research proposal, and the final seminar on the student's 
Dwn research. Only the last 2 seminars are required of students entering the 
doctoral program with a recognized master's degree. Students in the master's 
Drogram must present 1 departmental seminar for credit. 

All students must take 1 hour of CHEM 597, Professional Training, each 
semester in residence. 

All course work requirements of the department or the major division are min- 
mum requirements which may be increased by the student's graduate committee. 



86 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2< 



Research Director and Graduate Committee Selection. Each student should] 
select a research director and graduate committee preferably during the first | 
semester, but no later than the end of the second semester in residence. The! 
student must obtain a selection form provided by the graduate adviser and musti 
interview at least 5 faculty members before selecting a research director and I 
graduate committee. The committee shall consist of the research director (chair), | 
at least 1 member of the major division other than the research director, a member I 
outside the major division, and for a Ph.D. degree candidate a member outside the i 
department. The chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, if not 
otherwise appointed, is an ex-officio member of every graduate committee. A 
division may increase this requirement. 

Graduate Committee Functions. The functions of the graduate committee are 
listed below. 

1. To plan and approve the student's program of study. 

2. To review the student's progress in courses and suggest and approve changes in 
the program of study. 

3. To evaluate the student's progress in research and to make appropriate 
recommendations. 

4. To determine whether a student may continue toward a degree. If continuation 
is denied, the committee must notify in writing the department chair of the 
reasons for this denial. 

5. To read and evaluate the student's thesis or dissertation. 

6. To conduct required oral examinations. 

As soon as possible after being appointed, the committee will meet to plan the 
student's program. At this time the progress and program form is completed and 
filed with the graduate adviser. The committee may require preparation of a 
master's thesis even if directly pursuing a Ph.D. degree has been previously 
approved by the faculty. 

Research Tools. The department requires no specific research tools. A student's 
graduate committee, taking into account the student's background and the needs 
of the research area, may require that the student acquire one or more research 
tools (e.g., foreign language, computer programming, statistics, and so on). Any 
research tool requirement must be completed before scheduling the preliminary 
oral examination for doctoral degree students or the final oral examination for 
master's degree students. 

Assistantship Support. Continuation of assistantship support is contingent 
upon the student making satisfactory progress toward a degree. In addition, 
continuation of teaching assistantship support depends upon satisfactory 
performance of assigned duties. The Graduate School has established time limits 
for financial support. 

First Year Evaluation. The faculty, meeting as a committee of the whole, will 
review the progress of all graduate students at the end of their first year in 
residence. For students in the doctoral program the faculty can: 

1. recommend continuation in the doctoral program. 

2. recommend transfer in the doctoral program. 

3. request that the Graduate School terminate the student from the program 
(giving cause). 

For students in the master's program the faculty can: 
1. recommend petitioning the Graduate School to allow entry to the doctoral 
program (accelerated entry option). Such petition can be made any time after one 
semester in residence. 



Academic Programs Chemistry and Biochemistry / 87 

2. recommend continuation in the master's program with the option to petition 
the Graduate School to grant a master's degree equivalency. When granted, this 
allows the student to apply for entrance to the doctoral program without writing 
and defending a thesis. 

3. recommend continuation in the master's program with option to petition to 
enter the doctoral program after completion of a master's thesis. 

recommend continuation in a terminal master's program. 
5. request that the Graduate School terminate the student from the program 
(giving cause). 

Preliminary Examination for the Ph.D. Degree. Each student in the doctoral 
program must pass a preliminary examination before being advanced to candi- 
dacy. The written portion of the preliminary examination is given cumulatively 
with 10 examinations scheduled each calendar year. The student must pass 4 
examinations in no more than 10 consecutive trials. Students must begin 
cumulative examinations no later than the semester following completion of the 
divisional core course requirements. After the student completes the cumulative 
examinations, the preparation and defense of an original research proposal will 
serve as the oral portion of the preliminary examination. 

Summary of Ph.D. Degree Requirements. Each student must fulfill the require- 
ments of both the Graduate School and the Department of Chemistry and 
Biochemistry. These requirements are: 

1. to fulfill the divisional course requirements. 

2. to complete at least 6 hours of formal course work at the 400/500 level outside 
the major division, at least 3 of which must be within the department. 

3. to complete a course of study as determined by the graduate committee. 

4. to maintain at least a 3.00 grade point average. 

5. to attend weekly seminars and earn 2 credit hours of CHEM 595 beyond the 
master's degree requirement by presenting departmental seminars. 

6. to earn at least 32 credit hours in research and dissertation (CHEM 598 and 
600). 

7. to satisfy any research tool requirement established by the student's 
graduate committee. 

8. to pass a series of cumulative examinations which shall serve as the written 
portion of the preliminary examination. 

9. to prepare and defend an original research proposal which shall serve as the 
oral portion of the preliminary examination. 

10. to complete a research project and to prepare a dissertation acceptable to the 
student's graduate committee and the Graduate School. 

11. to schedule and pass a final oral examination (defense of dissertation). 

Summary of Master's Degree Requirements. Each student must fulfill the 
requirements of both the Graduate School and the Department of Chemistry and 
Biochemistry. These requirements are: 

1. to fulfill the divisional course requirements. 

2. to complete at least 3 hours of formal course work at the 400/500 level outside 
the major division. 

3. to complete at least 21 hours of formal course work at the 400/500 level with 
grades of A, B, or C. 

4. to earn at least 30 credit hours at the 400/500 level, at least 15 of which are at 
the 500 level. 

5. to maintain at least a 3.00 grade point average. 

6. to attend weekly seminars and earn 1 credit hour of CHEM 595 by presenting 
a departmental seminar. 

7. to earn at least 8 credit hours in research and thesis (CHEM 598 and 599). 



88 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2\ 

8. to satisfy any research tool requirement established by the student's 
graduate committee. 

9. to prepare and present a thesis on the research carried out. 
10. to schedule and pass a final oral examination. 

Cinema and Photography 

The Master of Fine Arts degree in cinema and photography is intended to provide 
substantial advanced training for a small number of highly talented individuals. 
Emphasis in the program is upon the artistic development of the individual 
student and the student's creative utilization of cinema or photography. 

Students may elect to concentrate in cinema or photography. While concentra- 
tion is a vital component of the program, our philosophy is that graduate study 
should increase the options available to the student upon graduation; therefore, 
cross-disciplinary study is encouraged. Strong supporting course work is avail- 
able in the areas of theory, history, and scriptwriting; through the School of Art 
and Design, course work in the other fine arts is also available. A distinguished 
faculty of 12, excellent facilities, and a large variety of curricular offerings allows 
the students to individually tailor programs to meet their post-graduation goals. 

Acceptance into the program and subsequent continuation in it are at the 
discretion of the Graduate School and the Department of Cinema and Photogra- 
phy. Minimal admission requirements are those of the Graduate School. Students 
should contact the director of graduate studies, cinema and photography, regard- 
ing admission procedures to the program. Prior to admission to the program, 
students must satisfy the departmental faculty that they are artistically qualified 
by presenting evidence of exceptional talent in 1 of the 2 concentrations offered in 
the degree program. This evidence will ordinarily consist of a portfolio of 
photographs or 1 or more films. In addition, applicants must arrange for 3 letters 
of recommendation to be forwarded in support of their application. It is assumed 
that most of the students applying for admission to the M.F.A. program will be 
graduates of institutions other than SIUC. All such students would ordinarily 
provide evidence of having completed training of a thoroughness and quality 
equivalent to that offered in the undergraduate program of the Department of 
Cinema and Photography. Students with an M.A. or M.S. degree will also be 
considered for admission. It is recommended that students wishing to emphasize 
in still photography have a course work background equivalent to C&P 310, 311, 
320, and 322. It is recommended that students wishing to emphasize in cinema 
have a course work background equivalent to C&P 355, 356, 360, and 368. 

In addition to the above admission requirements, an interview with the 
department's graduate committee is highly recommended, particularly for 
students with minimal course work in the field. 

A graduate student entering the M.F.A. program is normally expected to spend 
the equivalent of 2 academic years fulfilling required work. If the student lacks 
adequate course work preparation, or if the student serves as a graduate 
assistant, a longer period may be required. Students' creative work and artistic 
abilities are reviewed at the end of their first year in the program. If the faculty 
should conclude that a student has not made sufficient progress, such a person 
would be dropped from the program. In the second year of residence, each student 
would be engaged in a great deal of independent artistic work culminating in the 
M.F.A. creative project, involving the completion of one or more photographic 
exhibits or the completion of one or more motion pictures. The exact nature of the 
project would be determined in consultation between students and their commit- 
tees. All creative projects would have to be exhibited publicly before the 
department would consider this requirement satisfied. 

After the first semester the department chair appoints, in consultation with the 



Academic Programs Cinema and Photography / 89 

tudent, and the director of graduate studies a major adviser and a committee of 
two additional graduate faculty members. This committee develops a specific 
plan of study with the student, considering not only the requirements of the 

raduate School and of the degree program, but also the goals of the student. The 
major adviser supervises the creative project. The University reserves the right to 

etain a portfolio of each student's work. An oral examination by the faculty 
advisory committee would focus on an evaluation of the project. A formal report 
describing the project must be filed with the Graduate School. 
Degree requirements are 60 semester hours, including 30 hours at the 500 level. 

Course Requirements 

Photography 

L2 credits from C&P 401, 402, 404, 405, 418, 420, 421, 422, 423, 424; 

6 credits from C&P 471A/B; 

9 credits from C&P 597; 

6 credits from C&P 541A/B; 

6 credits from C&P 575; 

4 credits from C&P 595A; 
L4 credits from general electives; 

6 credits from C&P 598. 

"inema 
L2 credits from C&P 452, 454, 455, 456, 470B; 

6 credits from C&P 472A/B; 

9 credits from C&P 597; 

6 credits from C&P 542A/B; 

6 credits from C&P 468 and 574; 

4 credits from C&P 595B; 
L4 credits from general electives; 

6 credits from C&P 598. 
Completion of an M.F.A. creative project (registration for at least 6 hours in 

:&P 598 required). 
An oral final examination over the M.F.A. creative thesis. 



Communication Disorders and Sciences 

The Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences offers graduate work 
eading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The program 
m communication disorders and sciences at the master's level is designed to 
develop competence in the assessment and treatment of persons with communica- 
tion disorders. The Ph.D. degree program has as its objective the training of 
advanced students to become researchers and educators in specialized areas in 
peech/language pathology or audiology. 

Course work at the master's level should be planned to meet the academic and 
professional requirements for state and national certification, which are required 
for professional employment. The M.S. degree program in speech pathology or 
audiology should culminate in eligibility for one or both of the following 
certificates: (a) the special certificate in speech and language impaired of the 
Illinois State Teacher Certification Board; (b) the Certificate of Clinical Com- 
petence of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. ASLHA certifi- 
cation is required for work in agencies, hospitals, medical centers, and higher 
education settings. The speech pathology and audiology program is approved 
and registered with the Education and Training Board of the American Board of 
Examiners in speech pathology and audiology. 

The departmental programs in speech pathology and audiology match the 
requirements for certification which state that the student must complete a 



90 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2\ 

well-integrated program comprised of a minimum of 60 semester hours, including \ 
normal aspects of human communication, development thereof , disorders thereof . 
and clinical techniques for evaluation and management of speech, language, 01 
hearing disorders. Thirty of the 60 semester hours must be in courses that are 
acceptable toward a graduate degree by the university in which they are taken. 

GRE aptitude test scores must be submitted upon application. While they are 
not mandatory for admission, the scores must be submitted no later than the end 
of the first semester of residence. 

A number of graduate assistantships and fellowships are made available b 
the College of Communications and Fine Arts and the Graduate School each 
year. The assistantship awards of the College of Communications and Fine Arts 
are usually made in the spring for the following academic year by the department. 
Students may also apply through the department for graduate fellowships and 
dissertation research grants that are awarded annually by the Graduate School. 

Professional experiences for graduate students are provided in a variety of 
clinical settings: the University's clinical center; area special education facilities; 
the V.A. Hospital in Marion; nursing homes; Choate Mental Health and 
Developmental Center; and Good Samaritan Hospital in Mt. Vernon. Coopera- 
tive programming is maintained with Marion School for the Deaf, other public 
and private agencies such as the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the 
Easter Seal Society, and the University of Illinois Division of Services for 
Crippled Children. Students participate in traveling speech, language, and 
hearing clinics which serve schools and communities through the media of 
surveys, diagnostic examinations, and therapy. 

Specialized experiences with orthodontists, prosthodontists, plastic surgeons, 
otologists, and others of the medical and dental professions are also available in j 
the Carbondale, St. Louis, and Chicago areas as well as the medical school at 
Southern Illinois University. Emphasis is placed on interdisciplinary relation- 
ships with other professions throughout the training process. 

The department maintains many active research facilities which provide 
laboratories and specialized equipment for the study of both the normal and I 
impaired functions of the speech, language, and hearing processes. The speech i 
science laboratory is equipped for electromyographic study of the speech', 
musculature, radio telemetry, electrophysiology of hearing, and spectrographs 
analysis of speech signals. The experimental audiology laboratory, which 
includes a large anechoic chamber, is equipped for investigations in hearing 
sensitivity, localization, central tests, speech discrimination, and evoked re- 
sponse audiometry. The laboratory also has equipment needed for studies in 
automatic audiometry, middle ear immittance, and acoustic reflex experimenta- 
tion. This laboratory also has equipment for the measurement of physiological 
indices of emotion, such as electrophysiologic skin measurements. The depart- 
ment maintains its own mainframe computer terminal and microcomputer 
laboratory. The availability of sophisticated instrumentation has made pro- 
grammatic approaches to language research problems possible in the language 
laboratory. The department also maintains extensive materials for the study of 
organic problems. 

Additional information regarding financial aid, programs, and application 
procedures can be secured by writing to the chair, Department of Communication 
Disorders and Sciences, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, 
IL 62901. Inquiries from qualified graduates in other fields are welcomed, 
particularly those interested in interdisciplinary programs. 

Master's Degree Program Leading to Certification in Speech Pathology 
or Audiology 

The master's degree requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of acceptable 
graduate credit (3.0 average), at least 15 semester hours of which are at the 500 



Academic Programs Communication Disorders and Sciences / 91 

level, and the completion of an approved thesis or research project. Specific course 
requirements and total number of hours are generally determined by advisement 
after consultation with the graduate student. 

Students are encouraged to follow one of the following plans in speech 
pathology or audiology. 

Predoctoral (Thesis) Program: Certification in Speech Pathology. 

Professional Courses: 15 hours from CDS 505, 507, 510, 512, 420 

Research Tools: 3 hours from CDS 500: and 6 hours from CDS 431 or 503 

Research Design or Statistics: 3 

Electives: 3 hours selected CDS 408, 431, 503, 517, 521, 525, 526, 528, 530, 533, 536, 

540, 541, 544, 548, 550 

Thesis: 3 

Total: 30 

Terminal (Nonthesis) Program: Certification in Speech Pathology. 

Professional Courses: 17 hours from CDS 505, 507, 510, 512, 408, 420 

Research Tools: 6 hours from CDS 500 and 431 or 503 

Electives: 6 hours selected from CDS 408, 431, 503, 517, 521, 526, 528, 530, 533, 536, 

540, 541, 544, 548, 550 

Research Paper: 1 hour from CDS 593 

Total: 30 

Predoctoral (Thesis) Program: Certification in Audiology. 

Professional Courses: 21 hours from CDS 420, 521, 525, 526, 528, 530, 503. 

Research Tools: 6 hours from CDS 500 and a statistics course 

Thesis: 3 

Total: 30 

Terminal (Nonthesis) Program: Certification in Audiology. 
Professional Courses: 21 hours from CDS 420, 521, 525, 526, 528, 530, 503 
Research Tools: 3 hours from CDS 500 
Electives: 3 hours from CDS 507, 517, 540, 541 
Research Paper: 3 
Total: 30 

In addition to the academic programs detailed above, certification in speech 
pathology or audiology requires a minimum of 300 clock hours of direct 
supervised clinical contact of which 150 clock hours must be at the graduate level. 
The state certificate requires that 100 of the 300 clock hours be in a public school 
setting. The College of Education is entitled to certify students for the public 
schools; the Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences is entitled to 
certify students for the American Speech Language Hearing Association. Before 
graduation, a comprehensive examination as required by the Graduate School for 
non-thesis programs will be given by the faculty. This examination is generally 
scheduled after the student has completed at least two semesters of full-time work. 

Admission and Program Requirements for Direct Post-Baccalaureate 
and Accelerated Entry Options for the Ph.D. Degree in Communication 
Disorders and Sciences 

A student with a baccalaureate degree may apply for entry to the Ph.D. degree 
program via the direct post-baccalaureate option. Or, after one semester in the 
master's program, a student may petition the graduate committee for admission 
into the Ph.D. degree program via the accelerated entry option. 

Regarding direct post-baccalaureate entry, the student must have earned an 
undergraduate GPA of 3.75 or greater, in an ABESPA accredited program. A 
student out of a discipline other than communication disorders and sciences must 



92 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

have earned a GPA of 3.75, or greater, from a similarly accredited academic | 
program. The student must present to the graduate committee a GRE composite 
score of 1200 or above or an equivalent Miller's Analogy score. The student must 
have experience beyond the minimum ABESPA undergraduate curriculum such 
as undergraduate research, graduate level course work, advanced undergraduate 
course work, or undergraduate honors thesis. 

For accelerated entry, the student must earn a GPA of 3.75 or greater after 12 
hours of master's level communication disorders and sciences course work in the 
communication disorders and sciences M.S. program and must present to the 
graduate committee substantive evidence of research ability. The graduate 
committee must agree unanimously that the evidence presented represents 
extraordinary abilities. 

For both the direct post-baccalaureate and accelerated entry options, the 
student's application will be scheduled for discussion by the faculty. A two-thirds 
majority of the eligible voting members in support of the admission will be 
required. The retention criteria for students admitted through either the direct 
post-baccalaureate or the accelerated entry options will be the regular Ph.D. 
degree program retention criteria. 

Students admitted by either the direct post-baccalaureate or the accelerated 
entry option must complete the following requirements: all M.S. degree program 
requirements save the thesis/research paper requirement and all regular Ph.D. 
degree program requirements. 

All Ph.D. students admitted via the direct post-baccalaureate or the accelerated 
entry option must petition the graduate committee for permission to begin 
working on the Ph.D. degree requirements once the M.S. degree requirements 
have been completed. The petition must contain direct evidence of advanced 
scholarship and substantive evidence of research productivity. The graduate 
committee will recommend acceptable petitions to the faculty for consideration. A 
majority of the voting members must approve the petition. Only then may the 
student address the Ph.D. degree requirements. 

A student admitted through either the direct post-baccalaureate entry or the 
accelerated entry option may withdraw from the Ph.D. degree program by 
petitioning the graduate committee. In order to obtain the M.S. degree, the 
student must complete all outstanding M.S. degree requirements. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

Students, after consultation with their academic advisers, are expected to propose 
to the graduate faculty of the department the academic program they intend to 
pursue prior to taking the preliminary examination for admission to candidacy. 
The proposed program must meet the Graduate School requirements for resi- 
dency, and shall exclude course work designed to meet the research tool 
requirement. The program must also include a cognate area which will assure a 
meaningful competence in subject matter outside the student's major depart- 
ment. Graduate faculty approval of the proposal signifies an agreement between 
the student and the department. Students are encouraged to use the following 
plan in designing their programs. 

Doctoral Program in Communication Disorders and Sciences. 
Professional emphasis areas: 15 

Area A: Speech Rehabilitation 15 hours from 510, 512, 528, 533, 536, 540, 541, 
544, 548 or; 

Area B: Language Rehabilitation 15 hours from 505, 507, 517, 533, 536, 540, 541, 
544, or; 

Area C: Hearing Rehabilitation 15 hours from 521, 525, 526, 528, 530, 533, 536. 
Requirements Outside of Emphasis: 9 CDS hours to be selected from areas other 
than the principal area of emphasis (see areas A, B, C above). 



Academic Programs Communication Disorders and Sciences / 93 

Basic Core Program: 6 hours from CDS 503, 550: 
Cognate Area: 6 

Research Tool (See description that follows). 
Dissertation: 24 hours from CDS 600 and 601 
Total: 60 

Research Tool. The research tool shall replace neither a required nor a pre- 
requisite element of the student's proposed academic program and must be 
completed before the student will be permitted to take the preliminary examina- 
tion for admission to candidacy. 

The student must demonstrate an ability to deal with descriptive and 
inferential statistics and research design techniques. Ordinarily this will be 
accomplished by completing an appropriate sequence in statistics, as approved 
by the graduate committee of the Department of Communication Disorders and 
Sciences. Competency will be demonstrated by achieving a B average in the 
course sequence, or by proficiency. The sequence should be considered to be 
outside of any specific degree requirement. 

Preliminary Examination. After satisfactory completion of a majority of the 
course work inside and outside the area of emphasis, the basic core courses 
research tool, and the cognate requirements, students may request the pre- 
liminary examination. The preliminary examination shall be written and 
administered by no fewer than 5 graduate faculty members representing the area 
of emphasis, cognate, and research interests. Should students fail the first 
examination, they may, with faculty approval, repeat the examination once 
within a 12-month period. 

Dissertation. After successful completion of the preliminary examination, the 
student will be recommended to the Graduate School for admission to candidacy 
for the degree. The candidate must then complete a dissertation demonstrating 
capability in independent research. 

The final examination for program completion shall be oral and cover the 
subject of the candidate's dissertation and related academic and professional 
matters. 



Community Development 



Community development is a program of graduate studies in the applied social 
sciences leading to the Master of Science degree. 

Community development practitioners share a common concern; the allevia- 
tion of social problems through community and social change. This concern is 
expressed through a range of professional activities such as organizing tenant 
unions, training officers of consumer co-operatives, negotiating foundation 
grants for community cultural centers, designing community education outreach 
programs, or researching community issues. 

Most community developers are both specialists and generalists; specialists in 
the sense that they possess technical knowledge and experience in such fields as 
economics, education, ecology, agriculture, urban affairs, administration, plan- 
ning, or research; but generalists in their understanding and skill in facilitating 
processes of social change. Their process skills of working with people have made 
community developers indispensable to a large number of public and private 
programs. By developing organizations and institutions through which citizens 
can participate in policy formation and implementation, community developers 
are finding an increasing number of opportunities for themselves and the practice 
of their profession. 



94 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

The community development program has 5 full-time faculty members with ] 
professional expertise in several fields and academic settings. Academic cre- 
dentials include doctorates in education, anthropology, behavioral sciences, 
sociology, and political science. Past national and international field experiences 
of present faculty members include service with the Agency for International 
Development, the American Friends Service Committee, UNICEF, the World 
Bank, the Peace Corps, Vista, the National Scholarship Service, and Health 
Systems Agencies. Faculty are also involved in a variety of on-going community 
development activities at the local level, which include students as interns and 
graduate assistants. 

Several community service programs are operated out of the community 
development program. A University Year for Action project provides interns for 
numerous human service programs in Southern Illinois; Peace Corps training 
programs help prepare volunteers for work in Africa and the South Pacific. 
Recent research projects include a folklife inventory documenting the social 
traditions and heritage of Southern Illinois' diverse populations and a study of 
rural human services delivery. 

Admission Requirements 

A baccalaureate degree is necessary for admission. However, application to the 
program may be made before graduation during a student's senior year. 

Admission to the program is not based solely on a student's grade point 
average. Much weight is given to a student's commitment to action for human 
betterment, seriousness of purpose, and past experience in working on social and 
community problems. Current community development students include Peace 
Corps returnees, ex- Vista volunteers, community workers, and senior agency 
officials as well as recent college graduates. 

Prerequisites 

The prerequisites are 3 upper-division courses in the social sciences with a B grade 
or better, 3 semester hours of social science statistics at the undergraduate or 
graduate level, and proficiency in written communication. The social science 
courses should be in at least 2 of the following disciplines: political science, 
sociology, anthropology, social psychology, economics. The prerequisites may be 
satisfied after admission into the program. 

THE SIUC COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CURRICULUM 

The community development Master of Science degree program at SIUC offers 
several career emphases: community planning, community organizing, commu- 
nity relations training, community education, community research, and commu- 
nity program administration. 

All students are required to take core courses totaling 30 semester hours plus 14 
semester hours in their special emphasis. Students may design their courses of 
study to focus on particular interests or skills. 

Course of Study 

The 44 credit hour program consists of a core curriculum, including a supervised 
field internship, a minor or area of emphasis, and 1 of 4 master's degree options 
related to the emphasis. Core curriculum courses are on community organization, 
social change, research methods, and group process. The minor and electives are 
selected by students from courses related to their career objectives, and may be 
found within the community development program or other departments in the 
University. Students with extensive prior community development experience 
may have their internships waived under certain conditions. 



Academic Programs Community Development / 95 

Community Development Core Requirements (30 semester hours) 

CD 401-3 Introduction to Community Development 

CD 500-3 Research Seminar in Community Development 

CD 501-4 Small Group Process in Community Development 

CD 502-3 Community and Change 

CD 503-3 Problems of and Approaches to Community Development 

CD 589-2 Professional Seminar in Community Development 

CD 595-7 Internship 

Options to complete master's degree (5 semester hours) are either a thesis, 
research report, extended minor, or master's project. These 5 hours may be earned 
in one of the following ways: 

1. CD 599-5 Thesis Research 

2. CD 593-5 Individual Research in Community Development (for research 
report or master's project) 

3. Five semester hours in 400or 500-level courses in addition to the 9 hours in the 
regular minor (for extended minor). 

Other Course Requirements 

(14 semester hours) 

a. Minor (9 semester hours): at least 9 hours of 400- and 500-level courses in one 
or more disciplines, either in community development program areas of emphasis, 
or other areas selected by the student and approved by the community develop- 
ment faculty. Lists of recommended courses are maintained by the program. 

b. Electives (5 semester hours): additional 400and 500-level courses in the 
minor, elective community development courses, or other university departments 
are selected by the student. Community development electives are: 

CD 402-3 Comparative Community Development 

CD 403-3 Community Organization 

CD 404-3 Role Theory and Analysis in Community Development 

CD 405-3 Social Planning 

CD 491-1 to 6 Independent Study in Community Development 

CD 497-1 to 12 A-E, Seminar in Community Development 

Field Internship 

The field internship is required for the Master of Science degree and consists of 
approximately 350 clock hours of supervised field work in a community 
development project. The professional CD 589 Seminar in Community Develop- 
ment must be taken prior to or concurrently with the field internship. 

The objective of the field internship program is to provide a practical field 
experience in which students are exposed to some of the challenges and rewards 
of community development work. It is designed to test and develop skills, provide 
opportunity for personal and professional growth, and increase the ability to 
understand and analyze practical experience. In most cases, the intern is working 
with a group of persons sharing a common need or problem. The thrust of the 
project is to encourage self-help approaches to problem-solving and constructive 
change. The intern is expected to have a significant responsibility for the project's 
planning, execution, and outcome. The field internship requirement applies to all 
M.S. degree candidates. The field internship may be waived in exceptional cases 
where a student has extensive professional experience in community develop- 
ment work. 

Options for Completion of the Requirements for the Master's Degree 

Four options are available to complete the requirements for the Master of Science 
degree in community development: a master's thesis, a research project, an 
extended minor, or a master's project. The master's option selected by the student 



96 Graduate Catalog Chapter 

and approved by the program must be related to the student's area of emphasis or 
minor. At the completion of 24 hours of course work, the student declares ami 
defines a master's option. 

Thesis. The thesis must involve substantial new research in community devei 
opment. Procedures for the thesis option are the selection of a master's committee! 
the preparation and approval of a research prospectus, execution of the research 
and the submission and approval of the thesis. An oral examination by th< 
student's committee covering the thesis topic and the community developmen 
discipline completes the requirements for the degree. 

The thesis option is initiated by filing a form in duplicate with the progran 
office specifying the composition of the student's thesis committee and thesis 
topic. Four copies of the thesis are submitted to the program office upor 
completion: one for the program, one for the thesis committee chair, and 2 for th< 
dean of the Graduate School. 

Master's Project. The master's project is a community development project in 
which the student takes a major part in its conceptualization, design, and 
implementation. Procedures for the master's project are the selection' of a 
committee, the submission and approval of a project prospectus, completion oi 
the project, the preparation, submission, and approval of a final report, and the 
oral examination. Examples of a master's project are the development oi 
consumer cooperative, community health programs, economic development 
programs, completion of a community development project, and designing and 
implementing a training seminar or workshop. 

Research Report. The research report demonstrates the student's research and 
professional capabilities. Procedures for the research report option are the 
selection of a committee, the preparation and approval of a research prospectus, 
execution of the research, and submission and approval of the research report. An 
oral examination of the research topic and on the community development 
discipline complete the requirements for the Master of Science degree. 

The research report option is initiated by filing a form in duplicate with the 
program office, specifying the composition of the student's research committee 
and research topic. Three copies of the research report are submitted to the 
program office on completion: one for the program office, one for the committee 
chair, and a third for the dean of the Graduate School. 

Several features distinguish the master's project from an internship. For the 
master's project, the student takes on the major initiative for developing the 
project, and prepares a formal prospectus describing it prior to inception. The 
project should have a definite structure with a beginning, middle, and end. While 
the internship stresses learning and growth, the master's project requires the 
demonstration of independence and professional competence in community 
development. 

The master's project is initiated by filing a form in duplicate with the program 
office specifying the student's committee and the title of the master's project. 
Three copies of the final report are submitted to the program office upon 
completion: one for the program, one for the committee chair, and one for the dean 
of the Graduate School. 

Extended Minor (14 or more credit hours). The extended minor consists of 5 hours 
of course work outside of community development courses in addition to the 9 
hours of courses required for the minor. Since the student has 5 hours which are 
elective, as many as 19 hours may be accumulated for an extended minor. 
In general, the courses selected for the extended minor should have a focus, and 



Academic Programs Community Development / 97 

the focus and its validity developed under the guidance of the extended minor 
committee. 

Procedures for the extended minor option are the selection of an extended minor 
committee, the submission of a list of courses for the minor with a justification for 
their approval, satisfactory completion of course work, and the preparation and 
approval of a paper. An oral examination of the student covers general 
knowledge of community development and the extended minor field, and the 
relationship between the extended minor and community development. 

The extended minor option is initiated by filing a form in duplicate with the 
program office specifying the student's extended minor committee and the minor 
field. Three copies of a paper must be filed at completion, one for community 
development, one for the committee chair, and one for the dean of the Graduate 
School. Students may not take courses for an extended minor until their 
committees have been formed and the option officially filed. 

Oral Examination and Master's Degree Option Committee. Two faculty from 
community development, and a third member of the graduate faculty from 
another SIUC program constitute the oral examination and master's degree 
option committees. The committees are comprised of the same persons, and are 
selected by the student prior to filing the master's degree option form. 

Specialized Areas of Emphasis 

The student may select up to 19 hours of course work for a minor or area of 
emphasis, as part of the 44 units required for the Master of Science degree. The 
student's area of emphasis should be relevant to the master's option whether 
thesis, research report, master's project, or extended minor. 

Six areas of emphasis (community research, education, training, planning, 
organizing, or administration) may be selected from courses and colleges 
throughout SIUC and from the community development program. Course lists 
for each of these emphasis areas, plus consultation, are available from faculty 
advisers. Students may also design their own areas of emphasis with the consent 
of their faculty advisers. 

Community Organization. Community organizing is one of the fundamental 
skills of community development. There is a traditional and continuing concern 
for widespread participation and citizen representation in development programs. 
The vocation of community development includes employment as organizers for 
community action groups, cooperatives, tenant unions, neighborhood associa- 
tions, consumer lobby groups, and minority rights organizations. 

Community Education. The role of community development specialists in com- 
munity education is essentially that of inter-communicator. These specialists 
require a fundamental understanding of the art and science of teaching, as well 
as exposure to a variety of education philosophies and practices. The community 
education specialist coordinates educational activities for groups and individuals 
with unmet educational needs. 

Several minors are available within the broader area of community education 
such as: rehabilitation education, consumer education, health education, educa- 
tion in the arts and humanities, sex education, special education, and Afro- 
American or Black studies education. 

Social Planning. The purpose of the planning concentration is to provide the 
techniques and knowledge to students who wish to work as planners or citizen 
participation specialists for city and regional planning departments, state 
agencies, and private international development organizations. 
The relation of planning to community development is that of providing spe- 



98 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

cialists who can systematically study problem areas and potential resources, 
propose programmatic solutions, and appraise the likely consequences of 
planned and unplanned change. Community planning places emphasis oni 
involving citizens in the planning process in order to more fully reflect the diverse 
needs and values found in many towns and cities. 

Community Relations Training. The community relations training concentra- 
tion is designed to provide skills and knowledge to students who wish to practice 
various types of human relations training such as T-groups, leadership training 
groups, sensitivity groups, organizational development groups, consciousness- 
raising groups, and the like. 

The relation of training to community development is to provide specialists 
skilled in encouraging cooperative, creative human communication in small 
group settings, and to provide trainees for the development of community 
leadership. 

From a vocational standpoint, this type of training may be practiced as a 
human relations trainer (for which certification is provided by National Training 
Laboratories), a group welfare worker, a counselor, or an organization training 
officer. Such training is not intended to include the offering of therapy as 
practiced by clinical counselors, psychologists, or psychiatrists. 

Community Development Administration. The administration emphasis is 
intended for those interested in public administration and management at any 
level, federal, state, or city, as as well as for those who wish to be involved in the 
development and management of community owned business enterprises, com- 
munity development corporations, cooperatives, etc. 

Courses are available which provide skills needed for program planning, 
development, and evaluation within public and private organizations. 

Community Development Research. The research emphasis provides students 
with basic proficiency in applied methods of research in order to describe com- 
munity populations, assess community needs and problems, and evaluate 
programs designed to solve community problems. Typical employment oppor- 
tunities related to this specialization include grant proposal writing, demographic 
data collection and analysis for planning agencies, and action and evaluation 
research duties in program development with public and private organizations. 

THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DISCIPLINE 

The emergence of community development, as a practice and a discipline, is a 
post-World War II phenomenon which has its origins in the relief, rehabilitation, 
and reconstruction efforts of governmental and private agencies in Europe, 
Africa, and Asia. In this country, early beginnings of the discipline were reflected 
in agricultural and cooperative extension work, adult education, rural sociology, 
and social work with a largely rural focus. In the 1970's the U.S. Foreign Service 
programs (such as USAID and the Peace Corps) had strong community 
developmental emphasis. National programs like the War on Poverty (OEO) and 
the Great Society (Housing and Urban Development) began to focus on urban 
areas, while local, county, state, and national governments developed community 
development departments as problem-solving, need-assessment, and evaluation 
units. The recently independent nations of Africa and Asia have used community 
development as the primary method of nation-building in the post-colonial 
period, with both urban and rural emphasis. Today community development is a 
discipline and a practice that applies the theory and methods of social science to 
the solution of human problems at the community level. 



Academic Programs Community Development / 99 

Community Development Services at SIUC 

The Community Development Services at SIUC was established in 1953 as a 
component of area services. SIUC was then becoming a comprehensive univer- 
sity with a broad mission of teaching, research, and service, especially to the 
surrounding area. The earliest efforts of the Community Development Services 
staff were devoted to mobilizing the energies and resources of the citizens of the 
rural Southern Illinois areas. 

During the first 10 years, Community Development Services was involved in 
every sizeable community in Southern Illinois and included comprehensive study 
and action programs in communities from East St. Louis to Cairo. Service 
continued to be its major activity until 1974, but as new region-wide planning and 
service agencies emerged in the early 1960's, the need for trained community 
development professionals became increasingly apparent. Consequently, a 
Community Development Institute was authorized in 1962 to offer a Master of 
Science degree program in community development. The program was fully 
operational by the fall of 1966, with a contingent of 10 new students. 

A research unit was added to the institute and service operation in 1965. The 
program was redesignated as an academic unit within the College of Human 
Resources in 1973. Community development is now a program unit in the Divi- 
sion of Social and Community Services of the college. 

Approximately 200 students have graduated from the master's degree program 
in community development, the oldest in the U.S. It is professionally staffed by 6 
full-time faculty members and several graduate assistants. The staff maintain 
close working relationships with a variety of communities and planning, service, 
and development agencies, in which most students complete their field intern- 
ships. Areas of emphasis within the program are community development 
administration, community education, international community organization, 
social planning, community research, and community relations training and 
development. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of graduate assistantships is awarded each semester on the 
basis of performance in the program and need. Fellowships for outstanding 
graduate students are awarded each year by the SIUC Graduate School. Student 
work and other financial aid opportunities are coordinated through the Financial 
Aid office. 

Part-time Students 

It is possible to enter the community development program while in full-time 
employment. Core courses are offered in the evening on a regular basis. Students 
seeking advisement on part-time study should contact the department. 



Computer Science 



The Department of Computer Science offers a graduate program leading to the 
Master of Science degree with a major in computer science. Application forms for 
admission to the Graduate School may be obtained from the department. 

Admission and Retention 

Decisions concerning the admission of students to, and retention of students in, 
the graduate program will be made by the department faculty subject to the 
requirements of the Graduate School. 

The evaluation of applicants for admission is based primarily on the student's 
academic record with particular attention being given to past performance in 



100 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2\ 

relevant undergraduate course work. Applicants are expected to have a sub-j 
stantial background in undergraduate computer science courses covering high] 
level and assembly language programming, data structures, computer organiza- 
tion, logic design as well as discrete mathematics, calculus, and linear algebra. In I 
most cases, it would be expected that the applicant has completed course work ini 
the above subject areas prior to admission. 

General Requirements. A minimum of 30 hours of graduate credit must be< 
completed of which at least 15 has to be at the 500 level. More specifically, every 
candidate for the Master of Science degree in computer science must take: 

1. CS411andCS451 

2. one approved graduate level mathematics course 

3. four 500 level computer science lecture courses. 

In addition, the courses taken must include one from each of the three catego- 
ries: computer systems/ architecture, information systems/software, and theory. 
The department maintains a current listing of all the courses in these categories 
as well as a listing of approved mathematics courses. Graduate students are also 
expected to attend, on a regular basis, the colloquia sponsored by the department. 

Research Requirements. Students are required to write a research paper or thesis 
carrying credit under CS 592 or CS 599 respectively. The option chosen requires 
departmental approval. In the research paper option a maximum of 3 credit hours 
from courses CS 590, CS 592, CS 599 may count towards the 30 credit hours. 

After completion of all work, the student will be given a final oral examination 
over the thesis or research paper and other course work. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers graduate programs leading 
to the Master of Science in Education, the Specialist, and the Doctor of Philoso- 
phy in education degrees. Within the programs, the student may select a specialty 
area from one of the following: curriculum and instruction, computer-based 
education, early childhood, educational technology, elementary education, gifted 
and talented education, instructional development, mathematics education, 
reading and language studies, school library media, science and environmental 
education, secondary education, social studies education, and teacher education 
and supervision. 

Admission 

The applicant must complete the applications for admission to both the Graduate 
School and the department. General requirements for admission to graduate 
programs are described in Chapter 1 of this catalog. A selection and review 
committee screens the applicant on the basis of prior undergraduate and 
graduate work, grade point average, standardized test scores, work experience, 
and letters of recommendation, if needed. The committee may possibly recom- 
mend admission for a student with some deficiency if, in its opinion, the student 
shows unusual professional promise. 

Application materials may be obtained by addressing a request to: Coordinator 
of Graduate Studies, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Southern Illi- 
nois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. Specific information may 
be obtained by calling (618) 536-2441. 

Master's Degree 

The Master of Science in Education degree in curriculum and instruction requires 
the completion of a minimum of 32 semester hours of course work. At least 15 of 



Academic Programs Curriculum and Instruction / 101 

the 32 semester hours must be at the 500 level and taken at SIUC. The student 
must also meet curriculum and instruction core course requirements, research re- 
quirements, and specialty area requirements. No more than 1 1 semester hours of 
credit earned at another college or university may be accepted toward this degree. 

Each candidate's program is planned in consultation with a faculty adviser 
from the specialty area selected by the student, with consideration for the 
student's interests, experience, and specialty area. Unclassified graduate stu- 
dents should consult with the department chair for information and advice. 

A student desiring teacher certification (preschool, elementary, secondary, or 
K-12) must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program and must follow the 
teacher certification entitlement process established by SIUC in conjunction with 
the Illinois State Board of Education. 

The school library media specialist area of study offers courses which meet the 
requirements for the Standard Special Certificate in all areas of media, which is 
issued by the Illinois State Board of Education. Persons holding a valid teaching 
certificate may qualify as a school media professional by completing the 
following courses: C&I 438, 439, 440, 442, and 435 or 445. Other courses in the 
utilization and administration of teaching materials mare designed to prepare 
both audiovisual coordinators and librarians to become fully qualified media 
specialists who can administer all teaching materials. 

Program Requirements. The Master of Science in Education degree in curricu- 
lum and instruction requires a 9 semester hour professional core, specialty area 
courses, and research. This professional core is as follows: C&I 503, Introduction 
to Curriculum; C&I 504, Systematic Approaches to Instruction; and C&I 500, Re- 
search Methods in Education. The specialty area courses consist of either 23 
semester hours plus a research paper or project, or 17-20 semester hours plus a the- 
sis (3 to 6 semester hours). The minimum number of required semester hours is 32. 

Each student demonstrates research skill by preparing a research paper, a 
project, or a thesis. If the student chooses to satisfy the research requirement with 
a thesis or research paper, then the adviser becomes a part of a committee of no 
fewer than 3 persons selected by the student and the adviser. The adviser (chair) 
and at least one other person must be members of the faculty of the student's 
specialty area. The purpose of this committee is to assist with and approve the 
research requirement and to prepare and conduct the final comprehensive 
examination. 

The student choosing to satisfy the research requirement by preparing a 
research paper completes the research paper under the supervision of the adviser, 
or the adviser may constitute a 3 person committee which supervises the 
completion of the paper. The adviser will attest to the successful completion of the 
paper and report to the coordinator of graduate studies that graduation 
requirements have been satisfactorily completed. 

Each student in the M.S. Ed. degree program must complete a final comprehen- 
sive examination. This examination may be either written or oral, or both. The 
specialty area faculty will form a committee of no fewer than 3 persons to prepare 
and evaluate the final comprehensive examination. The student may take the 
final comprehensive examination no more than 3 times. 

If the student chooses to satisfy the research requirement by preparing a 
research paper, a coordinating committee of 3 persons representing the student's 
specialty area will prepare and evaluate the written comprehensive examination. 
A student selecting the research paper option must notify the coordinator of 
graduate studies and the specialty area coordinator at least 2 weeks prior to the 
date scheduled by the department for the written comprehensive examination. 
The written examination will be administered on the first Saturday in October, 
the first Saturday in March, and on Thursday of the third week of the summer 
session. 



102 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

If the student chooses to satisfy the research requirement by preparing a thesis 
or project the student will take a final oral comprehensive exam. The final oral 
comprehensive examination is a defense of the thesis or project and must be 
scheduled with the chair of the student's committee at least 2 weeks prior to the 
date desired for that examination. 

Specialist Degree in Curriculum and Instruction 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers the Specialist degree in 
curriculum and instruction. This degree program is designed for teachers and 
other personnel who seek to improve their performance in specialized areas. The 
Specialist degree program is intended for those preparing for positions which call 
for a higher level of study than the master's degree but without the emphasis on 
depth of research required for the doctorate. A major goal of this program is to 
strengthen an individual's area of specialization by providing the student with a 
program of greater depth and breadth than is possible at the master's degree level. 
The Specialist degree program is designed to meet the student's professional goals. 

Admission. Applicants for admission to the Specialist degree program must meet 
minimum Graduate School standards for admission to and retention in the Spe- 
cialist degree program. No more than 6 semester hours earned at another college or 
university may be accepted toward requirements for the Specialist degree. At the 
time of acceptance into the program, an advisory committee of 3 professors will be 
appointed to design the program cooperatively with the student, supervise the 
field study, and administer a comprehensive oral examination. At least 1 member of 
this committee, the student's adviser, will be from the student's area of specialty. 

Program of Studies. A minimum of 30 semester hours' credit beyond a master's 
degree, including field work, is required for completion of the program. At least 15 
semester hours must be at the 500 level. The Specialist degree in curriculum and 
instruction has a 12 semester hour core requirement; 14 to 17 semester hours of 
specialization; and 2 to 6 semester hours of independent investigation/research, 
for a total of 30 semester hours. The speciality area semester hours are determined 
by the student and the advisory committee. The professional core of courses is as 
follows: C&I 583, Instructional Theory, Principles, and Practices; C&I 584, 
Curriculum Theory, Foundations, and Principles; C&I 554, Integration of 
Educational Media; and C&I 585B, Supervision for Instructional Improvement. 

Ph.D. Degree in Curriculum and Instruction 

The Ph.D. degree in education with a concentration in curriculum and instruction 
is designed for teachers and other educational personnel who seek to improve 
their performance in general and specialized areas in either the public schools or 
the private sector. This program is designed for students who desire positions 
requiring advanced preparation at the highest level with emphasis on theories of 
curriculum and instruction and in-depth preparation in research. For example, 
this program is oriented toward students who aspire to positions with institutions 
of higher education, state departments of education in the United States, 
ministries of education in foreign countries, educational sections of human serv- 
ice agencies, business and industry, and public schools. 

Admission. In addition to the application for admission to the Graduate School, 
the applicant must also complete the departmental application for admission to 
the concentration and the related specialty area. A selection and review committee 
screens the applicant on the basis of prior graduate work, grade point average, 
standardized test scores (Miller Analogies Test or Graduate Record Examination), 
work experience, and letters of recommendation. The TOEFL score is required for 
foreign students. The selection committee recommends admission of the student 



Academic Programs Curriculum and Instruction / 103 

only if the specialty area has an appropriate sponsor for the applicant and if a 
faculty member who is qualified to direct dissertations agrees to serve as chair of 
the student's doctoral committee. 

The admissions committee may possibly recommend a student for admission 
who shows some deviation from departmental standards if, in the committee's 
opinion, the student shows unusual professional promise. 

Retention. Any prospective doctoral candidate with a grade point average of less 
than 3.25 and 20 semester hours of doctoral work will not be allowed to continue in 
the program and will not be readmitted at a later date. Students must accumulate 
an overall grade point average of 3.50 for all doctoral work to qualify to take the 
preliminary examination. 

Prior to the completion of 30 semester hours of course work, students meet with 
their major professors to determine whether or not to continue as doctoral 
students. Such matters as grade point average, progress in the program, course 
completion, motivation, and general academic scholarship skills in writing and 
research is considered. A report is then made to the doctoral committee and the 
departmental chair. 

Program Requirements. The concentration in curriculum and instruction has 
both College of Education and C&I requirements. A minimum of 64 semester 
hours beyond the master's degree is required. The College of Education profes- 
sional core of 8 semester hours consists of EDUC 590, Doctoral Seminar in 
Cultural Foundatons of Education and EDUC 591, Doctoral Seminar in Be- 
havioral Foundations of Education. 

The C&I requirements include a core of 9 semester hours; at least 23 semester 
hours in the selected specialty area; research tools usually totaling 8 semester 
hours or the equivalent (hours for research tools are not counted in the total of 64 
semester hours); and a minimum of 24 semester hours of dissertation. An 
internship of 2 to 8 semester hours is highly recommended. Courses comprising 
specialty area hours other than the core courses are determined by the student 
and the doctoral committee. The professional core of courses in the curriculum 
and instruction concentration is as follows: C&I 583, Instructional Theory, 
Principles, and Practices; C&I 584, Curriculum Theory, Foundations, and 
Principles; and C&I 582, Advanced Research Methods in Education. 

Research Requirements. Research tools are selected on the basis of their 
appropriateness for the area of concentration, specialization, and type of 
dissertation research. At least one research tool, as outlined by the College of 
Education is selected by the doctoral committee in cooperation with the graduate 
student. The 8 options available are: quantitative methods, historical methods, 
foreign language methods, philosophical methods, qualitative methods, symbolic 
methods, and evaluative methods. 

Preliminary Examination. The preparation and direction of the preliminary 
examination are the responsibility of the specialty faculty and the student's 
doctoral committee. Concepts related to curriculum, instruction, and research/ 
evaluation will be integrated into the preliminary examination. Additional oral 
and written examinations may be required by the student's doctoral committee. 
The examination will be offered 3 times a year: Wednesday, Thursday, and 
Friday of the fifth week of each term. A student may take the examination no 
more than 3 times. 

Prospectus, Dissertation, and Final Oral Examination. Students may not 
register for dissertation hours until they have passed the preliminary examina- 
tion. Having been admitted to candidacy, students submit prospectuses to their 



104 Graduate Catalog Chapter 'i 

doctoral committees for approval. The dissertation must show high attainment ir.j 
an independent original, scholarly, and creative effort. A student's dissertation 
will be circulated to members of the doctoral committee at least 3 weeks inl 
advance of proposed defense. 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction requires an oral examination 
conducted by the doctoral committee. Oral examinations are open to all interested 
observers. Notice of the time and place of the examination and the abstract of the 
dissertation are circulated throughout the department and the University. 



Economics 

The Department of Economics offers graduate programs that lead to both master's 
and doctoral degrees in economics. In order to provide students with the broadest 
types of experiences both programs combine a central core of economic theory and 
applied econometrics with offerings that emphasize both the applied and theoreti- 
cal aspects of 10 different fields of specialization. In addition to their breadth, both 
the master's and doctoral programs also require varying degrees of specialization 
so that all students have at least one area of expertise. The 12 month master's pro- 
gram prepares a student for either the doctoral program or a terminal degree that 
is sought by both private industry and government. After completing this pro- 
gram a student wishing to continue graduate education takes an additional 1 to 2 
years of course work and doctoral exams and usually spends 1 more year writing 
a doctoral dissertation (i.e., 2 to 3 additional years past the master's degree). 

Admission 

The overall scholastic record and potential of the applicant for admission is more 
important than prior preparation in specific areas of economics. While under- 
graduate specialization in economics is desirable, the program is open to students 
whose undergraduate specialization has been in other fields. However, if the 
student has not had intermediate level microeconomics, macroeconomics, and 
statistics, remedial work may be required before admission to the department. 
Calculus is also required and used extensively. 

Separate application forms must be submitted to the Department of Economics 
and to the Graduate School. Application materials may be obtained from: 
Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Economics, Southern Illinois Uni- 
versity at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 

All applicants are required to take the aptitude portion of the Graduate Record 
Examination. Information on testing dates and places may be obtained by 
writing to Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ 08540. Scores should be 
sent to Southern Illinois University at Carbondale marked Attention: Economics. 
All exam scores must be received before admission. 

Evaluations of applicants by the departmental admissions committee are 
based on information from the application form, GRE scores, transcripts, and 
other information. 

Applicants not admitted to the economics department who meet the Graduate 
School requirements may register for remedial courses as unclassified students. 
Such persons may be considered for admission to the Department of Economics 
at a later date, based on their performance in such remedial courses. 

Finally, all foreign applicants whose native language is not English must take 
the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The Department of 
Economics requires that the applicant score 550 or above for admission to the 
graduate program. The TOEFL must be taken no more than 12 months prior to 
the date when admission is sought. For information concerning TOEFL testing 
dates and locations write to Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ 08540. 

International students need not take the Graduate Record Examination prior 



Academic Programs Economics / 105 

to admission if the director of graduate studies in economics deems that this 
would place an undue hardship upon the applicant. It is in the student's best 
interest to do so, however, since the Graduate Record Examination is required 
upon matriculation. 

Entry into Ph.D. Program. There are 3 routes by which a student may enter the 
doctoral program. In the past, the standard method was through completion of 
the requirements for a master's degree and maintaining an average of at least 
3.25 (A = 4.0). This is still an option. Now, however, there are 2 alternatives 
available, at least for some students. 

Direct Entry. Direct baccalaureate degree entry into the program for the doctoral 
degree in economics is possible upon recommendation of the faulty. For direct 
entry, the student must meet Graduate School admission requirements and 
should have earned a grade point average of 3.0 or better (^4 = 4.0) on all 
undergraduate work, or have exhibited some other indication of the ability to do 
doctoral-level work in economics, such as GRE performance in the upper quartile. 
Application for direct baccalaureate degree entry should be made to the director of 
graduate studies in the Department of Economics. 

Accelerated Entry. After at least one semester in residence, a student enrolled in 
the M. A. or M.S. degree program may petition the graduate studies committee for 
accelerated entry into the Ph.D. degree program. The essential requirement for 
accelerated entry is that a student must be already prepared to begin research at 
the doctoral level. There must be substantive evidence of research or creative 
activity already carried out by the student (e.g., papers, publications, per- 
formances, or other evidence as appropriate to the discipline). Furthermore, the 
student should have demonstrated the ability to communicate effectively the 
results of such activity. Additional evidence of a student's readiness to begin 
doctoral work includes undergraduate and graduate records, scores on exams 
such as the GRE, standardized tests, and reference letters. If admitted, the 
student will proceed toward the Ph.D. degree in accordance with the established 
rules of the department and the Graduate School. 

Master's Degree 

The master's degree prepares the student for teaching in junior college, or for 
positions in government or business. 
The degree is awarded after the following requirements are fulfilled. 
1. Pass courses in ECON 465, Mathematical Economics, ECON 540a, Micro- 
economic Theory, ECON 541a, Macroeconomic Theory, ECON 467, Mathe- 
matical Statistics in Economics, and ECON 565, Applied Econometric Analysis. 
2. Pass two courses in a field of specialization in either economics or a field 
outside economics having a reasonable connection with economics, approved 
by the director of graduate studies. 

3. Write a research report (3 credits) or master's thesis (6 credits). 

4. Have earned 30 credits, at least 15 of which must be at the 500 level and at 
least 21 of which must be in economics. 

5. Have earned a 3.00 GPA in 400 and 500 level economics courses excluding 
ECON 425, 436, 440, 441, 471, 501, 525, and 598. 

6. Pass an oral examination. 

The typical master's degree program will include: for the fall semester 
microeconomics (ECON 540a), econometrics (ECON 467), and a field elective; for 
the spring semester macroeconomics (ECON 541a), econometrics (ECON 565), 
and a field elective; and for summer a thesis or research paper and an elective. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The Ph.D. degree prepares the student for teaching and research positions in the 



106 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

academic world, for positions as senior economist in private industry, for 
positions with private research or consulting organizations, or for government 
positions requiring advanced economic training. 

The degree is awarded for high accomplishment as evidenced by the following 
steps. 

1. Demonstrating proficiency in econometrics as a research tool through 
successful completion (minimum grade of B) of ECON 467 and ECON 567a,b. 

2. Demonstrating proficiency in mathematics or in mathematical economics by 
successful completion of MATH 352 or ECON 511. 

3. Pass Mathematical Economics I (ECON 465) and either History of Economic 
Thought (ECON 450) or The History of American Growth in the 20th 
Century (ECON 420). 

4. Earn 24 credits after the master's degree or the equivalent. 

5. Passing written qualifying examinations in macroeconomic and microeco- 
nomic theory after completion of appropriate course work for credit. 

6. Passing examinations in 2 specialized areas of economics after completion of 
appropriate course work for credit and with the prior consent of the director of 
graduate studies. 

7. Completion of a dissertation based on original research and successful 
defense of the dissertation before a faculty committee. 

8. Take 24 credits of Dissertation (ECON 600). 

The typical doctoral program for the first year will include: ECON 450, 467, and 
at least one mathematics tool course in the fall, ECON 540b, 541a, and 567a in the 
spring. The mathematics tool (MATH 352 or ECON 511) should be completed in 
the first year. The second year will include 540c, 541b, and 567b in the fall, and 
two field courses in the spring. In the third year, the fields will be completed in the 
fall and the student will work on a dissertation in the spring. 

Approved Fields 

The Department of Economics currently recognizes the following fields of 
specialization: economic development, international economics, monetary eco- 
nomics, advanced economic theory, econometric theory, public economics, re- 
source economics, and labor economics. 

The Doctoral Program in Education 

One may pursue a program of study leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in 
education through any of 8 approved concentrations: curriculum and instruction, 
educational administration, educational psychology, health education, higher 
education, physical education, special education, and vocational education 
studies. 

Students must satisfy the requirements of the Graduate School in addition to 
the College of Education requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in 
education. General policies pertaining to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in 
education are enumerated in this section; policies specific to each concentration 
may be obtained from the appropriate departmental chair. 

For program descriptions of Master of Science in Education and Specialist 
degrees, the student should review the material listed in this publication in the 
appropriate departmental section or consult the appropriate department. 

Application 

Applicants must submit the standard application materials to the Graduate 
School. Additional data may be requested by the faculty of the specific 
concentration. The student is encouraged to contact the appropriate depart- 
mental executive officer for specific guidelines. 



Academic Programs Education / 107 

Admission and Retention 

The application materials of those who meet Graduate School requirements for 
admission to the Ph.D. program are forwarded to the College of Education. The 
department concerned reviews all documents relative to the student and makes a 
recommendation to the academic affairs committee of the College of Education; 
this committee makes the final admission recommendation through the dean of 
the College of Education to the Graduate School. Retention standards beyond 
minimum Graduate School standards are established by each concentration and 
are available from the departmental executive officer of the appropriate 
department. 

Advisement 

For each student a doctoral committee consisting of a minimum of 5 members is 
constituted and approved according to procedures described in the Ph.D. Policies 
and Procedures Manual of the College of Education. Copies of the manual can be 
obtained from the dean of the College of Education. The doctoral committee also 
serves as the student's dissertation committee. 

The program, planned to include all graduate study beyond the master's degree, 
should be approved at a meeting of the student's committee. The program is then 
forwarded to the dean of the College of Education for final approval and filing. 

Program Requirements 

Each doctoral student in education must successfully complete a prescribed core 
of 8 semester hours in social and philosophical foundations of education (EDUC 
590) and in psychological foundations of education (EDUC 591). For each 
concentration there are also basic courses which should be completed prior to the 
student taking the preliminary examination. Information about these specific 
courses can be obtained from the appropriate departmental executive officer. 

Research Competencies. The Ph.D. degree in education is a research-oriented 
degree. As such, it consists of a program of studies and other appropriate 
experiences designed to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge, attitudes, and 
skills necessary to conduct systematic intellectual inquiry. This overall aim is 
accomplished via two major program components: (a) general research com- 
petencies, including an understanding of the fundamental nature of approaches 
to problem solution and an appreciation for the role of research in professional 
education, are developed through completion of a minimum of 32 semester hours 
of course work in any of 8 approved concentrations, and (b) specific technical and 
methodological competencies are developed through completion of individually 
prescribed research tools. Such tools are selected on the basis of their appropriate- 
ness for the area of concentration in which the student is working and their 
relevance to the student's research interests. Research tools are applied in the 
process of completing requirements for the doctoral dissertation. A list of 
approved research tools for the Ph.D. degree in education is available in the Ph.D. 
Policies and Procedures Manual of the College of Education. 

Preliminary Examination. All students in the Ph.D. program in education must 
take the preliminary examination over areas determined by the student's 
doctoral committee. In addition, the examination may cover areas specific to a 
concentration. The examination is offered 3 times a year: Wednesday, Thursday, 
and Friday of the fifth week of each term. 

A student may petition the doctoral committee for permission to take the 
preliminary examination after successful completion of the research requirement, 
successful completion of all or most of the course work, and successful completion 
of the doctoral seminar sequence in education. A student who fails the examina- 



108 / Graduate Catalog Chapter j 

tion on the initial attempt may take the examination 2 additional times. If at tha 
time the student has not passed the examination, the student is dropped from th* 
program. 

Admission to Candidacy. A student may be advanced to candidacy after th( 
student has completed the 2 doctoral seminars, EDUC 590 and 591, fulfilled the 
residency requirements for the doctoral degree (see degree requirement in Chapten 
1), met the research tool requirement, and passed the preliminary examination 
The doctoral committee chair should initiate the admission to candidacy forms 
and forward the forms to the dean of the College of Education. Admission tc 
candidacy is granted by the dean of the Graduate School upon the recommenda 
tion of the dean of the College of Education. The doctoral degree may not be 
conferred less than six months after admission to candidacy, except upon ap- 
proval of the dean of the Graduate School. 

Dissertation. The doctoral committee consists of a chair who is authorized to 
direct doctoral dissertations and at least 4 others who are authorized to serve on 
doctoral committees. The committee is appointed by the dean of the Graduate 
School upon the recommendation of the dean of the College of Education. At least 
one member of the committee must be from a department other than that of the 
student and at least one member from a unit outside the College of Education. 

In choosing a topic for the dissertation, the candidate should prepare a 
prospectus for the dissertation and submit the prospectus to the doctoral 
committee for approval. After the doctoral committee approves the prospectus, 
the chair of the committee files one copy of the approved prospectus in the office of 
the dean of the College of Education. 

Satisfactory completion of the dissertation requirement includes the passing of 
an oral examination covering the dissertation and related areas. 

Educational Administration and Higher Education 

The Department of Educational Administration and Higher Education offers an 
approved major in educational administration leading to the Master of Science in 
Education degree. It also administers the major in educational administration 
leading to the Specialist degree and provides courses and instructional personnel 
for doctoral students who wish to concentrate in educational administration at 
the doctoral level. All degrees are NC ATE approved. Interested applicants should 
direct inquiries to the admissions clerk of the department. 

Faculty from the Department of Educational Administration and Higher 
Education, in cooperation with faculty from other departments, offer courses in 
adult and community education. Inquiries about these courses should be directed 
to the chair of the department. 

Master of Science in Education Degree 

At the master's level, concentrations are offered in educational administration, 
instructional supervision, and adult education. 

Educational Administration Concentration. Within the educational administra- 
tion concentration, course work may be selected to meet Illinois State Board of 
Education certificated positions such as elementary principal, secondary princi- 
pal, curriculum coordinator, school business manager, vocational-technical 
director, special education director, and for a variety of noncertificated positions 
in other educational institutions and settings. A minimum of 32 semester hours is 
required. Degree requirements and administrative certification requirements are 
not necessarily the same although programs may be planned to meet both degree 



Academic Programs Educational Administration and Higher Education / 109 

and certification requirements. Students must make application for the adminis- 
trative certification program through the dean's office, College of Education. 

Admission criteria include undergraduate grade point average, work experi- 
ence, and letters of reference from persons knowledgeable of the candidate's 
ability to do graduate work. 

The Master of Science in Education degree with a concentration in educational 
administration includes a basic core: administration, EAHE 501 and 503; 
research and tool subjects, EAHE 500, and EAHE 593; a foundations course (e.g., 
EAHE 430, 432, or 454); and a course in curriculum (e.g., EAHE 511, C&I 531, or 
C&I 571). Elective courses are determined by the student and the adviser. A 
research report and comprehensive oral examination are also required. It is 
recommended that applicants seeking administrative certification in the public 
schools have at least 2 years of successful teaching experience prior to or 
concurrent with the course work. 

Instructional Supervision Concentration. Regulations for the concentration in 
instructional supervision parallel those for the concentration in educational 
administration. Students in this area normally elect specific courses in supervi- 
sion and curriculum appropriate to their goals as supervisors, (e.g., elementary, 
secondary, or both). The department encourages a cross-departmental approach 
in the selection of appropriate courses for individual programs. 

Adult Education Concentration. The master's degree in adult education is 
housed in the Department of Educational Administration and Higher Education. 
The purposes of the program are to provide those persons who already work in the 
field the opportunity to upgrade their current knowledge about adult education 
and to train persons new to the field for positions in higher education or other 
agencies that offer programming in the adult and continuing education field. 

To meet these objectives, the program has two options: a specialization in 
higher education; and an option to prepare persons for agency employment. 

The core categories of the program include: general adult education (EAHE 
455, Introduction to Adult and Continuing Education); administration (courses 
vary by option), social and psychological foundations of adult education (EAHE 
514, Foundations of Adult Education and EAHE 537, The Adult Learner); 
research and thesis (EAHE 500, Educational Research Methods and EAHE 593, 
Individual Research); internship (EAHE 595); and electives. Both options require 
32 semester hours of credit. 

Specialist Degree 

The Specialist degree major, educational administration, is structured on a 30 
semester hour sequence which requires: 6 semester hours in advanced administra- 
tion seminars, EAHE 551 and 553; 4 semester hours in an administrative intern- 
ship, EAHE 595; and 3 semester hours in independent investigation, EAHE 596; 
and additional elective courses, totaling a minimum of 17 semester hours. These 
elective courses are determined by the student and an advisory committee. A 
comprehensive oral examination and a field-based research study is also 
required. Options in educational administration and adult education are offered. 

Although course work may be planned to meet both degree and Illinois State 
Board of Education certification requirements, degree requirements and adminis- 
trative certification are not necessarily the same. For example, candidates seeking 
the Illinois Superintendency endorsement (level III) are required to have level I or 
level II administrative endorsement, and additional requirements, such as a 
minimum of 9 semester hours in foundations of education course work in their 
total graduate program, a field study, and 6 semester hours in interdisciplinary 
seminars, EAHE 559 and 561 or in cognate course work taken out of the college. 

Admissions criteria include: (1) objective measures rated on a point scale 



110 Graduate Catalog Chapter 

developed by the department, i.e., undergraduate and graduate grade point}* 
averages and the results from the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate Record 
Examination and (2) subjective measures including letters of reference fromj' 
persons knowledgeable of the candidate's ability to do advanced graduate work, 
and the appropriate work experience. 

This program is based on the supposition that the applicant has a master's 
degree in educational administration or its equivalent. Students entering the 
program without this previous administrative training will be required to 
complete prerequisite work as determined by the student's committee. 

Educational Administration Option. For the educational administration option, 
the specific course requirements are as follows: advanced administrative semi- 
nars, EAHE 551 and 553, Politics of Education and Systems and Accountability; 
EAHE 527, School Business Administration; EAHE 531, School Board and 
Policies; EAHE 595, Internships in Educational Administration; EAHE 596, 
Independent Investigation; and at least 11 hours of electives approved by the 
student's adviser. 

Adult Education Option. For the adult education option, the specific course 
requirements are as follows: EAHE 475, Administration of Staff Development; 
EAHE 510, Foundations of Adult Education; EAHE 527, School Business 
Administration; advanced seminars, EAHE 551 and 553; EAHE 565, Continuing 
Education and Extension; EAHE 595, Internship in Educational Administra- 
tion; EAHE 596, Independent Investigation; and 6 semester hours of electives 
approved by the student's adviser. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Education 

The Department of Educational Administration and Higher Education partici- 
pates in the doctoral program in education with an approved concentration in 
educational administration. See the description of the Ph.D. degree in education. 
Inquiries regarding application to their programs should be directed to the 
admissions clerk of the Department of Educational Administration and Higher 
Education. 



Educational Psychology 



The Department of Educational Psychology offers graduate studies that lead to 
the Master of Science, the Specialist, and the Ph.D. in Education degrees. In 
addition, completion of course work and supervised experiences that meet 
standards for state entitlement and certification of school psychologists and 
counselors are a part of the degree programs. The purposes of these graduate 
programs are to prepare professional educational psychologists to engage in the 
practice of their specialization and to pursue research in their areas of interest. 
Programs are monitored to be in line with standards set forth by the American 
Association of Counseling and Development, National Association of School 
Psychologists, the American Psychological Association, the North Central 
Association, and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. 
The counselor education program is accredited by the Council for the Accredita- 
tion of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). 

Professional experiences and interests of students along with the teaching and 
research capabilities of the faculty serve as a basis for individualized courses of 
study. Sufficient latitude in program planning is provided so that students in 
concert with their adviser and their committee plan programs to capitalize on 
student interests and faculty capabilities. Human learning and cognition, 
affective behavior, development, instructional psychology, child and adult coun- 



Academic Programs Educational Psychology /111 

seling, marriage and family counseling, career development, measurement and 
statistics, psychological assessment, and research design represent professional 
and research specialties of the faculty. 

Master of Science in Education 

Academic experiences leading to the Master of Science degree are provided 
through concentrations in educational psychology and counselor education. 
Graduates from these programs are prepared to pursue advanced graduate studies 
and assume roles as professional counselors or educational psychologists in 
schools, colleges, and other agencies that serve the developmental needs of people. 

Program requirements: core requirements consist of competencies in learning, 
quantitative methods, and development. Specific course selections to meet the 
core, transfer of credit, and the composition of the rest of the degree program are 
determined by the students and their advisers with the approval of the 
department chair. 

Completion of a thesis, research paper, or project (1-6 hours) is required to meet 
the requirements of a master's degree in education. A thesis requires a research 
format that follows a formal method of inquiry to provide answers to questions of 
a basic nature to the field. Research papers or projects focus on specific informa- 
tion-gathering procedures or a product that meets a need for specific purposes. 

An oral or written comprehensive examination covering course work, thesis, 
research paper, or project is required before students can be recommended for 
graduation. The faculty of each concentration determines the specific nature of 
the examination. 

Admission and Retention. Students seeking admission to master's degree stud- 
ies in the department must apply to and meet requirements for admission to the 
Graduate School and be approved by the Department of Educational Psychology. 
Scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), an undergraduate grade 
point average of 2.7 ( A - 4.0) for unconditional admission (students with an 
undergraduate grade point average of 2.4 may be considered for conditional 
admission); letters of recommendation, and evidence of successful experience or 
commitment to the profession are required. Each student application is considered 
Dn an individual basis. Professional qualifications, graduate courses taken, and 
student goals are also considered. 

The adviser, along with the faculty of the concentration, is responsible for 
reviewing student progress each semester. Students are required to maintain a 3.0 
grade point average and to be progressing toward their professional goals within 
the guidelines formulated in the advisement process. Failure to make progress or 
violations of department, college, or Graduate School regulations may result in 
dismissal from the program. 

Specific information about programs and how to apply may be obtained by 
calling (618) 536-7763 or writing to the chair, Department of Educational 
Psychology, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The master's degree concentration in educational psychology is a minimum 
32-hour program. Students who wish to acquire fundamental knowledge and 
inquiry skills in human learning and research design are required to write a 
thesis (6 hours). Students who are more interested in applied positions or 
obtaining the foundation experiences upon which course work for counselors and 
school psychologists are based may elect the research paper or project option. 

Graduates from this program have taken positions as teachers, researchers, 
and instructional designers and evaluators in the military, schools, industry, the 
military, colleges, and other institutions. Others have continued to pursue their 



112 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

education at the Ph.D. level or integrate their experiences into the entitlement 
programs for certification in counseling or school psychology. 

COUNSELOR EDUCATION 

Students who complete this program also fulfill the requirements of the 
entitlement program for certification in Illinois. This is a minimum 48-hour 
CACREP approved program that prepares students to work with children and 
adults in elementary and secondary schools, higher education, mental health 
settings, and other agencies or settings. Emphasis is placed on child, adolescent, 
adult, and marriage counseling. Programs that focus primarily on handicapped 
or abnormal populations are centered in other departments in the University. 

Students who first pursue the program in educational psychology as ai 
preparation for counseling certification should indicate this intent at the 
beginning of their program. In this manner, experiences can be planned to better 
meet the needs of the student. 

SPECIALIST DEGREE 

The Specialist degree is awarded to students who complete successfully a year of 
sequenced experiences (minimum of 30 semester hours) beyond the master's 
degree. School psychologists and counselors are served by this degree program. It 
is designed to be an interactive model of education and training involving local 
school districts, the Illinois State Board of Education Office, the Department of 
Educational Psychology, and other appropriate sources. 

School Psychologists. Students who complete a sequence of courses leading to 
the Specialist degree are eligible for certification as school psychologists. The 
program is based upon standards established by the National Association of 
School Psychologists and certification requirements set forth by most states. 

Counselors. All programs are individually planned to meet the professional 
objectives of the student. Typically, students prepare themselves to be directors of 
programs and counselor supervisors. 

Admission and Retention. Persons may seek admission to the Specialist degree 
program either at completion of the undergraduate or master's degree. Applicants 
may have varied undergraduate majors. However, they are expected to have 
some course background in psychology and other related fields. They must have 
successfully completed at least 1 course in each of the following 3 areas: 
personality theories, psychological measurement, and child development. A 
minimal undergraduate grade point average of 2.7 (A = 4.0) is required for 
unconditional admission to the program. The appropriate faculty will review 
applications to determine acceptable course work consistent with the applicant's 
preparation, career aspirations, and the requirements of the program. 

Since only a limited number of students can be accommodated by the program, 
applications should be received by March 1 for consideration for admission 
during the following academic year. Applications received after this deadline can 
be considered only if space is available. 

The coordinator of the respective entitlement programs is responsible for initi- 
ating a review of each student's progress in the program each semester. Students 
who are not progressing satisfactorily or who are in violation of department, 
college, or Graduate School regulations may be dropped from the program. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Education 

Advanced studies leading to a Ph.D. degree are offered by the Department of 



Academic Programs Educational Psychology / 113 

Educational Psychology. Individualized programs of sequential studies, based 
on a general core of foundation knowledges, are required for each candidate. 
Students along with their doctoral committee plan programs related to student 
background and interests, the professional requirements of the program, and the 
professional competencies of the faculty. 

Faculty in the department provide research and professional competencies in 
counseling, psychological appraisal, instructional psychology, school psychol- 
ogy, and measurement and statistics. 

Application. Students must apply to the chair, Department of Educational 
Psychology, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901- 
4618, (618) 536-7763. Specific questions about programs and how to apply should 
be directed to the Department of Educational Psychology at the address identified 
above or by phone. 

Admission and Retention. Applications are reviewed by the department faculty 
and recommendations forwarded to the College of Education and the Graduate 
School. Test scores from the Graduate Record Examination are required. A 
personal interview with a candidate may be required. 

The performance of each doctoral candidate is reviewed each semester. 
Maintenance of 3.0 grade point average and compliance with policies of the 
department, the college, and Graduate School are also required. 

Core Requirements. Students are required to meet core competence in learning, 
measurement, statistics, research methodology, and affective behavior. Specific 
courses or other means used to satisfy these areas are determined by the depart- 
ment upon recommendation from the student's doctoral committee. Students are 
expected to bring to the doctoral program a background of course work and 
experiences commensurate with a master's degree in educational psychology 
;hat includes foundations in psychology, education, and other related areas. 

Research, Teaching, and Practicum Experience. Each student is required to 
demonstrate professional competence through supervised experiences. These 
experiences include research, teaching, and personal interactions in consulting, 
psychometric, or counseling situations. It is recommended that doctoral students 
;ake an approved internship in their area of professional specialization. Such in- 
;ernships are usually of a year's duration and must be approved by the department. 

Preliminary Examinations. All Ph.D. candidates must complete a preliminary 
examination over their doctoral course work before formal admission to candi- 
lacy. The doctoral committee with the concurrence of the department is 
•esponsible for the development and evaluation of the preliminary examination. 

Doctoral Committees. Students are assigned a doctoral adviser upon admission 
;o the program. Before the end of the first year of doctoral study a doctoral 
committee is constituted. At this time a new chair may be chosen to head the 
committee which assists and evaluates students in their program. The committee 
s also responsible for an oral examination over the completed dissertation and 
student's general knowledge of the professional field. 



.ngineermg 

lie College of Engineering and Technology teaching and research programs are 
upported by appropriate courses, equipment, and facilities in a modern building 
issigned to the college. In addition, research opportunities and funding are 



IN Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

provided through the Coal Research Center, the Materials Technology Center 
and the Office of Research, Development, and Administration. Also the college 
operates the College of Engineering and Technology Applied Research Centei 
(CETARC). Large sponsoring agencies such as major corporations or technical 
associations may ask the college to conduct research of a basic nature in order 
that they may devote their own laboratories to work of a developmental 
character. Small organizations may call on the college for more direct help in the 
solution of specific problems. Graduate programs leading to the Master of Science 
degree with a major in engineering and the Doctor of Philosophy degree ini 
engineering science are available in the College of Engineering and Technology. 

Master of Science in Engineering 

The Master of Science degree with a major in engineering is available for 3. 
concentrations in the 3 engineering Departments of Civil Engineering and 
Mechanics, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering and Energy 
Processes. Course offerings and research activities within the departments 
include the following. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING AND MECHANICS CONCENTRATION 

Topics included are: numerical fluid and solid mechanics, mechanics of composite 
materials, continuum mechanics, experimental stress analysis, biomechanics, 
stability, photoelasticity, water quality control, hazardous waste treatment and 
disposal, hydraulic design, viscous and inviscid flow, wave motion, turbulence, 
structural analysis, and structural design. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CONCENTRATION 

Topics included are: circuits theory, electronics, solid state devices and materials, 
digital systems, energy sources and conversion, computers and automation, 
bioengineering, systems analysis and design, automatic controls, communica-i 
tion theory, instrumentation, and electromagnetics, and quantum electronics. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND ENERGY PROCESSES CONCENTRATION 

Topics included are: air pollution control, mass and heat transfer, coal conver-i 
sion, electrochemical desulfurization, thermal science, thermal systems design, 
solar systems design, chemical and biochemical processes, mechanical systems, 
computer-aided design, materials science, and catalysis. 

Master of Science in Mining Engineering 

Topics included are: rock mechanics and ground control, finite element analysis of 
mining structures, experimental rock mechanics, mine subsidence, coal process- 
ing, computer simulation of coal processing plants, surface and underground 
mining systems performance optimization, evaluation of innovative mining 
systems, mineral economics and operations research, surface mine reclamation. 

Admission 

Students seeking admission to the graduate program in the College of Engineer- 
ing and Technology must meet the admission standards set by the Graduate 
School and the department they wish to enter. Some departments require a 
bachelor's degree in engineering or its equivalent for admission into the program 
whereas others require a bachelor's degree with a major in engineering, 
mathematics, physical science, or life science with competence in mathematics. A 
student whose undergraduate training is deficient may be required by the 
department to take course work without graduate credit. 

Requirements 

A graduate student in engineering is required to develop a program of study with 



Academic Programs Engineering / 115 

a graduate adviser and establish a graduate committee of at least 3 members at 
the earliest possible date. Each student is required to concentrate in one of the 
branches of engineering, and with the approval of the graduate committee, may 
also take courses in other branches of engineering or in areas of science and 
business, such as physics, geology, chemistry, mathematics, life science, admin- 
istrative sciences, or computer science. 

For a student who wishes to complete the requirements of the master's degree 
with a thesis, a minimum of 30 semester hours of acceptable graduate credit is 
required. Of this total, 18 semester hours must be earned within the major 
department. Each candidate is also required to pass a comprehensive examina- 
tion covering all of the student's graduate work including thesis. 

If a student prefers the non-thesis option, a minimum of 36 semester hours of 
acceptable graduate credit is required. The student is expected to take at least 21 
semester hours within the major department including no more than 3 semester 
hours of the appropriate Engineering 592 course to be devoted to the preparation 
of a research paper. In addition, each candidate is required to pass a written 
comprehensive examination. 

Each student will select a minimum of 3 engineering graduate faculty members 
to serve as a graduate committee, subject to approval of the chair of the 
department administering the concentration. The committee must consist of at 
least 1 member from 1 of the other 3 engineering departments and will: 

1. approve the student's program of study, 

2. approve the student's research paper topic, 

3. approve the completed research paper, and 

4. administer and approve the written comprehensive examination. 
Teaching or research assistantships and fellowships are available for qualified 

applicants. Additional information about programs, courses, assistantships, and 
fellowships may be obtained from the College of Engineering and Technology or 
any one of the 4 engineering departments. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering Science 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in engineering science is available for 3 concen- 
trations in 4 engineering departments. The areas of concentration are as follows. 

AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 

Mechanics (Solids, Fluids, and Materials). This area provides students with 
in-depth knowledge in solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, structures, experimental 
stress analysis, soil and rock mechanics, mine ground control, and materials 
science. A student may select course work from over 75 semester hours of existing 
500-level engineering courses. Additional relevant courses may be taken in 
physics, mathematics, and geology. Research thrusts include finite element 
analysis of structures, water jet cutting of materials, mechanical characterization 
of composite materials and rocks, solid-liquid separation mechanics, field 
geotechnical studies in underground mines and tunnels, surface and sub-surface 
effects of mining, metallic glasses, surface and interface phenomena. 

Fossil Energy (Mining, Coal Conversion, Coal Utilization, and Pollution Con- 
trol). A student with interests in fossil fuel extraction and utilization and 
associated environmental problems may specialize in this area. Typical course 
work includes mining, processing, combustion, and conversion of fossil fuels as 
well as environmental problems abatement associated with fossil fuels. Over 45 
semester hours of engineering course work at the 500-level are currently 
available. Other relevant courses in this area may be taken in physics, chemistry, 
and geology. Current areas of research include desulfurization of coal using a 
multitude of physical and chemical processes, recovery of coal from waste 
materials, surface-mined land reclamation, systems simulation of coal mining, 



116 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

coal conversion, and fluidized bed combustion. A new area of abatement of 
environmental pollution emanating from these processes has also been 
developed. 

Electrical Systems (Electromagnetics, Properties, and Instrumentation). A stu- 
dent interested in advanced study in this area of concentration may select from 
the following areas: control and system theory, instrumentation, and digital 
systems, solid state devices, and electromagnetics. Approximately 28 semester 
hours of electrical engineering course work at the 500-level are currently 
available. An additional group of courses at the 500-level is available in .the 
Departments of Computer Science, Mathematics, and Physics. Current research 
in this area includes electromagnetic properties of rock strata, lightning protec- 
tion, equivalent circuits for lightning, microwave instrumentation, computer 
applications, fiber optics, control and network theory and systems. 

ADMISSIONS AND RETENTION 

Admission to the doctoral program requires a master's degree in engineering or 
its equivalent. Applicants for the doctoral degree must meet Graduate School 
admission requirements and be approved by the college graduate studies 
committee. In addition to the Graduate School and other college requirements, 
the committee ordinarily requires a grade point average of 3.5 (4 point scale) in 
graduate level work. Applicants are required to submit GRE scores in support of 
their application for admission. Except for persons from English-speaking 
countries, international students are required to have a TOEFL score of 600 or 
higher for admission. 

Upon admission to the doctoral program, an interim graduate adviser will be 
assigned for each student by the college associate dean for graduate studies. This 
adviser will be responsible with the student for planning the course work portion 
of the program. The college graduate studies committee will be kept informed of 
the student's program of study. 

Transfer credit will normally be given for some of the graduate level courses 
suitable to the program upon review by the college graduate studies committee. 
Proficiency examinations may be authorized by the committee for areas in which 
questions of transfer credit arise. No credits will be given for industrial 
experience. 

Notwithstanding the number of credits transferred towards the Ph.D. program, 
every student must complete at least 18 credit hours of approved course work at 
SIUC prior to taking the candidacy examination. 

Retention is governed by the rules of the Graduate School. Students should 
avoid the accumulation of incomplete grades. No student with more than 2 
incomplete grades can be awarded a graduate assistant appointment, and a 
student holding a graduate assistant appointment is subject to having the ap- 
pointment terminated upon acquiring 2 or more incomplete grades. 

CURRICULUM 

A minimum of 38 credit hours of course work and 24 credit hours of dissertation 
research is required. The course work must be completed in 2 areas: area of 
concentration and program core. A student must complete a minimum of 18 hours 
of course work relevant to an area of concentration. The course work in this area 
will consist of courses in engineering, mathematics, or science. A minimum of 12 
hours of electives must be taken in 500-level courses. Of these, a minimum of 9 
hours must be taken in 500-level courses in engineering science. The course work 
in the area of concentration is intended to provide depth in the student's area of 
research. The program core consists of 20 hours of course work in systems theory, 
design of engineering experiments, experimental data acquisition-theory and 
practice, advanced numerical methods in engineering, advanced engineering 



Academic Programs Engineering / 117 

analysis (I and II), and engineering science seminar. A dissertation must be 
completed in the student's area of research interest with the approval of the 
dissertation committee. 

CANDIDACY 

A Ph.D. student must satisfy all graduate school requirements. Acceptance to 
Ph.D. candidacy is contingent upon the successful completion of written 
examinations composed of questions that require substantive knowledge of 
experimental and theoretical topics in the program core and elective courses. 
However, questions are not limited to post M.S. course work. The examinations 
are designed to evaluate the breadth and depth of the student's education, to 
encourage the student to organize and integrate knowledge, and to demonstrate 
the student's competence. The examination in the program core area will be the 
same for all students taking the examination at any one time. The examination in 
the area of concentration will vary depending upon the student's area of research. 
Each student is expected to pass the candidacy examination the first time it is 
taken. If a student fails to pass any component of the candidacy examination, the 
college graduate studies committee and the student's candidacy committee will 
review the student's examination performance, academic progress, and potential 
for successful completion of the degree. The joint committee will decide which 
examinations the candidate must retake or it may decide to terminate the 
student's enrollment. In any event, the student will not be permitted to take the 
examination in any area more than twice. 

DISSERTATION 

A dissertation must be written under the direction or co-direction of an 
engineering faculty member and approved by dissertation committee consisting 
3f a minimum of 5 members one of whom must be from outside the College of 
Engineering and Technology. The dissertation committee must be formed no 
ater than immediately after successful completion of the candidacy examina- 
tion. The members of this committee need not be the same as the members of the 
:andidacy examination committee. 

A dissertation research proposal must be approved by the dissertation 
committee. Candidates will be required to present an acceptable dissertation 
lescribing original research performed with minimal supervision. Dissertation 
approval is based on a successful oral defense of the dissertation research and 
approval of the dissertation. This requires approval of at least 80% of the 
lissertation committee. 

1RADUATION 

1. All requirements of the Graduate School must be met. 

2. A minimum of 38 hours of course work beyond an M.S. degree in engineering, 
or its equivalent, must be completed with a minimum grade point average of 
3.25. 

3. An acceptable dissertation must be completed within 5 years after admission 
to candidacy or the student will be required to repeat the candidacy 
examinations. 



English 

The Department of English offers programs leading to the Master of Arts and the 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees with a major in English. Students enrolled in a 
)rogram leading to the Master of Science in Education degree in secondary 
education or higher education may take courses in English to satisfy requirements 



1 IS Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

for the teaching specialty. Students enrolled in the Ph.D. degree in education 
program may take courses in English for the elective portion of the program when 
permitted by the specific department participating in the degree. 

Admission 

Students seeking admission to the graduate program in English must first be 
admitted by the Graduate School before they can be admitted to the Department 
of English. 

Students seeking admission to the M. A. degree program are strongly advised to 
take the verbal and advanced section of the Graduate Record Examination. This 
is especially true for those students wishing to compete for fellowship support. 
Those seeking unconditional admission to the Doctor of Philosophy degree pro- 
gram must present a score of the 70th percentile or above in the advanced section 
of the Graduate Record Examination. 

Information about admission and the necessary admission forms to the 
graduate programs in English may be obtained by calling (618-453-5321) or by 
writing: Director of Graduate Studies, Department of English, Southern Illinois 
University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 

Transfer Credit 

Within limits imposed by the Graduate School, transfer credits will be accepted 
by the Department of English subject to the following restrictions. 

The student must petition the director of graduate studies indicating the 
number and level of hours being submitted for credit, where and when the work 
was done, and which grade was received. As nearly as possible, the course to be 
transferred should be equated with a course offered by the SIUC Department of 
English. The student will then be assigned to the appropriate faculty member, 
who will examine the student over the material of the course and recommend 
whether the transfer credits should be accepted and whether the course satisfies 
the course distribution requirements of the department. The director of graduate 
studies will act on the recommendation and forward it to the proper authorities. 

Retention 

In the entire graduate program, the student may accumulate up to 3 hours of work 
below B, so long as a 3.0 M.A. or 3.25 Ph.D. average is maintained. If the student 
has accumulated more than 3 hours, but fewer than 10 hours, of grades below B, 
these must be replaced by an equal number of hours of A or B in addition to 
maintaining the required average. That is, the minimum number of semester 
hours of course work may be increased from 30 to a maximum of 36. A student 
who accumulates more than 9 hours of C will be dropped from the program. 

A student who is granted a deferred or incomplete grade must complete the 
work by the end of the next term in residence. Exception to this rule will be made 
only in a very special case and must be made through petition to the graduate 
studies committee. A student who has accumulated more than 6 hours of such 
work will not be allowed to register for more course work until the total of deferred 
work is reduced to not more than 3 semester hours. Deferred or incomplete work 
will be regarded as finished when a student has submitted all examinations, 
papers, etc., to the instructor. Deferred or incomplete grades in ENG 595, 600, and 
601 are not included in the above regulations. 

Course Work 

Students may offer work from outside the department (in a single field or in two or 
more related fields) toward either the Master of Arts or the Ph.D. degree provided 
that the work does not interfere with regular requirements of the Department of 
English and has relevance to their program. 



Academic Programs English / 119 

Master of Arts Degree 

The Master of Arts degree major in English requires satisfactory completion of 30 
semester hours, of which 15 must be earned in 500-level courses. M.A. students 
may elect to focus their study either on a literature concentration or on the study 
of literature combined with a concentration in composition. 

LITERATURE CONCENTRATION 

The literature concentration requires students to take the following courses: 

ENG 502-3 Introduction to Graduate Study and Teaching College Composition 

ENG 403-3 History of the English Language or 

ENG 401-3 Modern English Grammar 

Electives covering the historical literary periods: 6 English or American literary 

period courses for 18 hours credit — three from Group I and three from Group II: 

Group I: a. Anglo-Saxon and Medieval English literature, b. Renaissance and 
17th century English literature, c. Restoration and 18th century English 
literature, d. 19th century English literature. 

Group II: a. American literature before 1885. b. American literature since 1885. 
c. Modern British literature, d. Modern Continental literature. 

Additional Electives. The student may use the remaining 9 hours of the 30 hours 
of graduate work required for the M.A. with literature concentration degree as 
follows: a. 9 hours of graduate level credit courses in the Department of English, 
or b. a 9 hour area of emphasis in a special field: in the Department of English 
(such as creative writing, criticism, etc.); or interdisciplinary study outside the 
department (in such areas as linguistics, foreign language, journalism, philos- 
ophy, history, etc.). With the approval of the director of graduate studies, such 
study will be entered as a special minor on the student's record. A B in all courses 
is necessary to qualify course work as an area of concentration. Some graduate 
students may need more than the minimal 30 hours of credit for the master's 
degree if they wish to offer an area of concentration. 

COMPOSITION CONCENTRATION 

The composition concentration requires students to take 18 semester hours in the 
composition segment and 12 semester hours in the literature segment as listed 
below. 

Required Courses. 

ENG 401-3 Modern English Grammars 

ENG 501-3 Research in Composition 

ENG 581-3 to 9 Problems in Teaching English 

ENG 502-3 Introduction to Graduate Study and Teaching College Composition 

Electives. Composition segment: one course must be selected from each of the two 

areas. 

Writing 

ENG 490-3 Expository Writing 

ENG 491-3 Technical Writing 

Language and Rhetoric 

ENG 403-3 History of the English Language 

ENG 596-3 to 12 Language Studies 

SPCH 440-3 Language Behavior 

Courses offered by departments other than English by permission of the director 

of graduate studies 

Literature segment: 4 courses must be selected from 4 of the 5 areas: Medieval and 



120 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

Renaissance literature, Restoration and 18th century literature, 19th century 
literature, modern British literature, American literature. 

Other Requirements. In addition, students in both concentrations must complete 
the following requirements. 

Satisfy a foreign language requirement by completing with an average of not 
less than B two years of college-level work in one foreign language or FL 488 a 
foreign language as a research tool course or the equivalent. Equivalent work will 
be judged on an ad-hoc basis by the director of graduate studies. Otherwise the 
requirement must be satisfied by passing the ETS examination. 

Submit to the director of graduate studies 2 copies of a research paper which 
has been given a grade of not less than B. The research paper is to be typed 
according to Graduate School guidelines and the MLA Style Sheet. Students in 
the composition concentration must submit 2 copies of a research paper written 
for 1 of the courses in composition. 

Students who have chosen the literature concentration must pass the master's 
comprehensive examination over 6 historical periods of literature. Students in the 
composition concentration must pass the master's comprehensive examination 
based on course work in both segments and a reading list. 

Students who have opted to write a master's research project and who have 
received permission from the graduate studies committee to do so do not need to 
satisfy the last 2 requirements listed above. They will have to submit 2 copies of 
their completed research project to the director of graduate studies. The thesis 
must be typed to follow the Graduate School guidelines and MLA Style Sheet. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

Students must apply formally for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy degree 
program, including students who have earned a master's degree at SIUC. 
Admission to the Ph.D. program is decided by the graduate studies committee, 
which makes its decision according to the following criteria: 
l.An M.A. degree in English or its equivalent 

2. Appropriate grade-point average (normally, a 3.25 is the acceptable mini- 
mum) 

3. A satisfactory score on the GRE advanced literature examination (normally 
the 70th percentile will constitute an acceptable minimum score) 

A full-time student holding a master's degree can complete the doctoral pro- 
gram in two years, though most prefer three. Students are considered Ph.D. 
candidates when they have (1) completed the prescribed course of study, (2) 
satisfied the research-tool requirements, (3) passed the preliminary examination, 
and (4) been recommended by the English graduate faculty. The Graduate School 
recognizes students as Ph.D. candidates after it receives notification that the 
students have passed the preliminary examinations. Students must be admitted 
to candidacy at least 6 months prior to the final examination on the dissertation. 

Course of Study 

There is no prescribed number of hours for the Ph.D. degree in English. Required 
courses are as follows: 

1. If students have never had courses, graduate or undergraduate, in Chaucer, 
Shakespeare, and Milton, they are required to remedy this deficiency; 

2. Students are required to have taken at least one graduate course in each of the 
6 major fields (see M.A. course requirements) and ENG 401 and 403 or the 
equivalents; 

3. In addition, courses may be prescribed by the students' advisory committee to 
insure that they will have a comprehensive knowledge of a major and 2 
related minor areas; 



Academic Programs English / 121 

4. Ph.D. students are normally required to complete for credit, with no grade 
lower than B, at least one 500-level course in each minor area of study. 

Research Tool Requirements 

A student may satisfy the research tool requirement by fulfilling 1 of the 3 options 
listed below. The choice of option and languages selected must be approved by the 
student's advisory committee. 

1. A reading knowledge, demonstrated by examination, of 2 languages in 
addition to English. Each must be a language in which there is a substantial 
literature for research and which is germane to the student's field. Foreign 
students may specify their native language as one of the foreign languages, 
provided it is one which meets the above requirements. Foreign students 
choosing this option will be required to demonstrate fluency in oral and 
written English. 

2. A command of one foreign language and its literature demonstrated by 
examination or by at least 3 courses numbered 400 or above, or the 
equivalent, with an average grade not lower than 3.0. Satisfaction of this 
requirement normally requires the equivalent of 3 years of study at the 
college level with grades of B or better. Foreign students may use their native 
languages provided those languages are appropriate to the particular fields 
of major emphasis. Foreign students choosing this option will be required to 
demonstrate fluency in oral and written English. 

3. A reading knowledge of a single foreign language, demonstrated by examina- 
tion, and a special research technique or collateral field of knowledge. A 
special research technique should represent the acquisition of any special 
skill that will effectively contribute to the research proficiency of the student 
(provided that such a skill is not an assumed or traditional part of the major). 
The collateral field of knowledge is expected to broaden the student's 
scholarly background by permitting exploration of knowledge in a field 
related to the major. 

To satisfy the research technique or collateral field requirement the student 
may complete a total of 2 semester courses numbered 400 or above, with an 
average grade not lower than 3.0. 

The department has expanded its Ph.D. program into interdisciplinary studies 
on a cooperative basis with departments that deal with one pertinent subject 
matter and which are interested in such interdisciplinary cooperation, e.g., the 
Departments of Philosophy, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, 
Cinema and Photography, Speech, Theater, Sociology, etc. Permission for an 
interdisciplinary minor must be approved by the student's committee and the 
graduate studies committee. 

Preliminary Examinations. Students on a fellowship or a graduate assistant- 
ship will be expected to take preliminary examinations no later than 2 or 3 years, 
respectively, after receipt of their M. A. degree. 

Preliminary examinations covering 3 areas are prepared and graded by the 
student's advisory committee, and will cover 3 areas. A major area examination 
consists of one 6 hour written exam, the minor areas of two 3 hour written exams. 
Preliminary examinations will be scheduled only twice in a single term. 

At the discretion of the committee, a 2 hour oral examination may follow the 
decision on the 3 written examinations. 



English as a Foreign Language 

(See Linguistics for program description.) 



122 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures offers graduate programs 
leading to the Master of Arts degree in foreign languages and literatures with 
concentrations in French, German, or Spanish. A student whose degree program 
makes provision for a graduate minor may follow a program of study leading to a 
minor in these same subjects as well as in Russian. 

Students may complete requirements for a teaching specialty in French, 
German, Russian, or Spanish for the Master of Science in Education degree 
majoring in secondary education or in higher education. 

Students seeking the Master of Arts degree will be governed by the policies of 
the Graduate School with respect to admission, minimum credit hours, scholastic 
attainment, residence, and maximum time limits for completion of the program. 

Admission 

In addition to meeting requirements of the Graduate School, the applicant for 
admission to the programs in the Department of Foreign Languages and 
Literatures should hold a bachelor's degree with a major or at least 18 semester 
hours (27 quarter hours) of courses on the junior-senior level in French, German, 
or Spanish. Students who meet requirements for admission to the Graduate 
School but do not meet departmental requirements may register as unclassified 
students for specific graduate courses in the department only with consent of the 
instructor and authorization from the head of their language section. 

Requirements for Master of Arts 

Students who have been admitted to graduate study will plan their course of 
study in periodic consultations with their graduate advisers. During such 
consultations, each student will decide upon either a thesis or a non-thesis (i.e., 
research paper) program. This program should be made before the end of the 
second semester of study. Students choosing to write a thesis will register for the 
thesis course (599), which provides from one to six semester hours of credit. 
Regardless of whether the thesis or non-thesis program is chosen, every 
candidate must pass a comprehensive written examination and a final oral 
examination at a time specified by the language section. For the student writing a 
thesis, this final oral examination is primarily a defense of the thesis. 

A minimum of 30 semester hours are required, of which at least 15 must be in 
500-level courses. All students must take FL 566-3, Bibliography and Research 
Techniques, which should be taken as early as possible during the course of 
studies; also required are the linguistics structure (411) or history (412) of the 
language concentration. FL 436-3, Methods in Teaching Foreign Language, is 
recommended for all teaching assistants and those who intend to make teaching 
their career. With approval of the adviser, graduate courses outside the language 
in which the degree is being taken may be counted towards the total unit 
requirement. Beyond such requirements as are specified for each language, 
students must demonstrate proficiency in a second foreign language by passing 
an exam in that language or by successfully completing approved course work in 
that language. 

FRENCH 

The program of study leading to the Master of Arts degree with a concentration in 
French is planned to give a balanced overview in the areas of French language, 
literature, and civilization, and to allow a high degree of flexibility in the 
elaboration of the student's total program in French. Required courses are: 
FL 566 Bibliography and Research Techniques 



Academic Programs Foreign Languages and Literatures / 123 

FR 411-3 Linguistic Structure of French 

or 

FR 412-4 History of the French Language 

FR 470-3 Backgrounds of French Civilization 

FR 510-3 Masterpieces of French Literature 

FR 525-3 Advanced Language Skills. 

The student will consult with the graduate adviser in determining a suitable 
program beyond those requirements. 
Thesis or Research Paper (option 1 or 2 is required). 

Option 1 . If writing a thesis either (a) 6 hours of FR 599 or (b) 3 hours of FR 599 
plus 3 hours of an elective French graduate course. 

Option 2. If writing a research paper either (a) 4 hours of elective French graduate 
course work, plus 2 hours of FL 506 or (b) 6 hours of elective French graduate 
course work. 

GERMAN 

The program of study leading to a Master of Arts degree with a concentration in 
German is planned to emphasize either German language and linguistics or 
German literature; a minor must be completed in the other of these two fields. 
Although GER 411, Linguistic Structure of German is not required, it is strongly 
recommended for prospective teachers of German. Required courses are: 
FL 566-3 Bibliography and Research Techniques 
GER 411-3 Linguistic Structure of German 
GER 412-3 History of the German Language 

One course in an older period of a Germanic language. (GER 510-3, Middle High 
German, is recommended, but an alternative course could be GER 512-3, 
Historical German Dialects.) The student will consult with the German adviser in 
determining a suitable program beyond these requirements. 
Thesis or Research Paper (option 1 or 2 is required). 



Option 1 . If writing a thesis either (a) 6 hours of GER 599 or (b) 3 hours of GER 599 
plus 3 hours of an elective German graduate course. 

Option 2. If writing a research paper either (a) 4 hours of elective German 
graduate course work, plus 2 hours of FL 507 or (b) 6 hours of elective German 
graduate course work. 

SPANISH 

The program of study leading to the Master of Arts degree with a major in 

Spanish is designed to survey at least 2 of the following: Hispanic linguistics, 

Peninsular literature, and Spanish American literature. Requirements are: 

FL566-3 Bibliography and Research Techniques 

SPAN 411-3 Linguistic Structure of Spanish 

or 

SPAN 412-3 History of the Spanish Language 

SPAN 410-3 Advanced Language Study. 

The student will consult with the graduate adviser in determining a suitable 
program beyond those requirements. 

Thesis or research paper (option 1 or 2 is required). SPAN 599 or (b) Option 1: If 
writing a thesis, either (a) 6 hours of 3 hours of SPAN 599 plus 3 hours of an 
elective Spanish graduate course. Option 2: If writing a research paper, either (a) 4 
hours of elective Spanish graduate course work, plus 2 hours of FL 509 or (b) 6 
hours of elective Spanish graduate course work. 



124 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

Requirements for Master of Science in Education 

The Master of Science in Education degree majoring in secondary education with 
a teaching emphasis in French, German, Russian, or Spanish requires a 
minimum of 30 hours, at least 13-17 semester hours in the subject matter area and 
13-17 semester hours in secondary education. The Master of Science in Education 
degree major in higher education with a teaching emphasis in a foreign language 
requires at least 20 semester hours in the subject matter and 12 semester hours in 
higher education. 

Further details as to specific requirements will be found in the respective 
program descriptions. For either degree, if the teaching emphasis is Russian, 
Russian 415 is required. 

Forestry 

The Department of Forestry offers advanced courses for the Master of Science 
degree with a major in forestry. In addition, curricula are available which permit 
graduate students with an interest in forestry to pursue their interest in Doctor of 
Philosophy degree programs in other departments. 

Admission 

In addition to requirements set forth by the Graduate School, the Department of 
Forestry requires the following: 

1 . A minimum grade point average of 2.7 is required for admission (A - 4.0). The 
department will permit conditional entry between the 2.5 and 2.7 grade point 
average level. A grade point average of 2.7 or higher is required for stipend 
eligibility when available. 

2. The student is required to provide proof of proficiency in technical writing. 
Normally an expository essay is required to evaluate whether the student 
should have remedial grammar or writing courses. 

3. Three letters of recommendation from former professors, employers, or other 
responsible individuals are required. 

4. The aptitude test of the Graduate Record Examination is required of all 
applicants. This test may be taken during the first semester of residence. 

5. Each applicant must complete the statement of interest form. This form 
indicates the student's area of interest in forestry and the faculty member 
with whom the student desires to study. All correspondence should be 
directed to the chair of the Department of Forestry. 

Retention and Completion Requirements 

Upon the graduate student's arrival on campus, an advisory committee of 3-5 
members of the graduate faculty will be formed to guide the student's work. The 
same committee will be responsible for preparation and administration of thesis 
exams and also for the review and evaluation of the thesis. The advisory 
committee chair and at least one other member of the committee shall be 
members of the forestry department. The other members may be selected from 
any academic unit including forestry. 

Summary of Events. 
1. The deadlines for receipt of applications and official transcripts in the office 
of the Graduate School are (a) the second Saturday in July for admission to 
the fall semester (b) the last Saturday in November for admission to the 
spring semester (c) the last Saturday in March for admission to the summer 
term. 



Academic Programs Forestry / 125 

2. Letters of recommendation should reach the forestry department chair by the 
same dates as above. 

3. Acceptance by department and Graduate School should be announced one 
month or earlier than the desired matriculation date. A thorough review will 
be made by a screening committee of forestry department graduate faculty 
and the departmental adviser. Students rejected for admission will also be 
notified. 

4. Registration for first semester's work after student's acceptance by the 
department. 

5. Appointment of advisory committee chair, written plan for course work, and 
selection of tentative thesis areas all within first 2 months of residence. 

6. Preparation of formal written thesis outline and preparation of research 
proposal by the eighth week of the second semester. 

7. Completion of final, typed or reproduced review copies of thesis and 
submission of advisory committee at least 3 weeks in advance of oral defense 
of thesis. Handwritten or incomplete work will not be acceptable. 

8. Oral exam to be followed by completion of required approval forms. If thesis 
requires modifications, this should be accomplished immediately to reach the 
graduate dean's office in due time set by the Graduate School. One bound 
copy of the thesis will be provided for the department, 1 for the chair of the 
advisory committee in addition to 2 copies required for the Graduate School 
and a copy for the author. Additional copies may be required for projects 
sponsored by outside agencies. 

Master of Science Programs 

The Department of Forestry offers 3 areas of concentration with specialties 
within each. Combination of emphasis is possible. 

FOREST RESOURCE MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION 

Under this heading, a graduate program may be elected with an area of emphasis 
in forest management, forest ecology, forest resources measurements, forest 
resources economics, forest genetics, or forest policy and administration. 

OUTDOOR RECREATION RESOURCE MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION 

Emphasis may be made in social, managerial, or natural science aspects of 
wildlands recreation and park planning and management in the given graduate 
program depending on the student's interest. 

WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Physical, mechanical, or biological properties of wood or woodbase materials 
may be studied. Also, the production and marketing of forest products may be 
selected. 
A specialty in environmental studies in forestry is available. 

Assistantships and Fellowships. Research assistantships are sponsored each 
year by the Mclntire-Stennis Cooperative Forest Research Act. Teaching 
assistantships funded by the School of Agriculture are also available. 

In addition to general awards made through the Graduate School, stipends for 
research studies are available from the Federal Forest Service, the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Interior, other federal and state agencies, and private corporations. 

Requirements 

Since the normal minimum requirement for graduation is 32 semester hours, the 
completion of degree work for students holding assistantships should be 
accomplished within four semesters (including summer) which is also the normal 
maximum span for financial aid. 
The student must attain a grade of B or better for all courses specifically 



126 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

required in the student's academic program and which are offered by the 
Department of Forestry. 

To gain teaching experience, graduate students are expected to assist in the 
classroom or laboratory for at least 1 academic semester (20 hours per week) 
during their tenure with the forestry department. The remaining semesters will 
also involve either research or teaching at the rate of 20 hours a week. All 
graduate students are required to enroll in Seminar (FOR 501) for 2 semesters for 
which they will receive 1 semester hour of credit. 

Staff 

In addition to the faculty listed in the Graduate School Catalog, several adjunct 
professors also hold appointments with the forestry department. These professors 
are assigned to the Forest Science Laboratory of the North Central Forest 
Experiment Station and the Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge. They advise 
and serve on graduate guidance committees. 

Research Facilities Land. SIUC is well endowed with a number of different forest 
types which are available to the forestry department for teaching and research 
purposes. In particular, we are conducting or planning research and demonstra- 
tion programs on forest plots and experimental fields of the 3000 acres of the 
University and its experimental farms. We also have access to wooded lands of 
the 600 acres of the Touch of Nature Environmental Center, 400 acres at the Pine 
Hills Field Research Station, and other forests. 

Through various memoranda of understanding and special use permits we 
have use of forested lands and plots on the 43,000 acres of the Crab Orchard 
Wildlife Refuge, the 250,000 acres of the Shawnee National Forest, and the 4000 
acres of the Trail of Tears State Forest, all of which are within an hour's drive of 
Carbondale. In addition, we can conduct basic research on the 640 acres tract of 
the Beall forest near Mt. Carmel, Illinois. The forests on this land represent one of 
the last central hardwoods remnants of virgin bottomlands and slopes and are 
under the jurisdiction of the Illinois Nature Preserves Commission. 

Physical Facilities. A research greenhouse operated in cooperation with the U.S. 
Forest Service at the Tree Improvement Center on the western side of the campus 
is in operation for research and graduate teaching. Greenhouses and growth 
chamber facilities in the agriculture greenhouses in conjunction with the 
Department of Plant and Soil Science are also available. 

A variety of laboratories for all phases of forestry research as well as access, 
through cooperative agreements, to laboratory facilities with other agencies on 
the campus are in service. The Forest Science Laboratory of the U.S. Forest 
Service, located adjacent to the forestry department offices, is available to our 
graduate students for research and other functions. In addition, a wood testing 
laboratory and a large wood products pilot plant is accessible at SIUC College of 
Technical Careers. 



Geography 

The Department of Geography offers programs that lead to the Master of Arts, 
Master of Science, and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees in geography. Students 
may also complete requirements for the Master of Science in Education degree in 
secondary education with a teaching emphasis in geography. 

Geography is the discipline that deals with the relationship between human 
beings and their environment. The Department of Geography emphasizes the 
applied aspects of this theme, environmental analysis, planning, and manage- 
ment. The graduate program includes the several dimensions of this emphasis, 



Academic Programs Geography / 127 

e.g., the role of resources in economic development and regional planning from 
physical/biological, technological, socio-economic, policy, and spatial view- 
points. Students take courses that give them a foundation in these dimensions of 
environmental planning and management through a core program, then develop 
an area of strength within this theme. Students also develop the analytic and 
research skills appropriate to their emphasis. 

The graduate program stresses a problem-solving perspective, for which habits 
of critical analysis and dialogue are essential. Students take the initiative in 
designing and carrying out their programs with the guidance of an advisory 
committee and the departmental faculty. Geography maintains major linkages 
with many other departments. Courses and faculty expertise in other depart- 
ments complement those in geography, and students are encouraged to take 
advantage of this. Each student's progress is assessed at regular intervals by the 
faculty, and the student is notified of the faculty's assessment. The student is 
expected to show continued progress in carrying out the program of study, and in 
developing habits of scholarship and professionalism. 

Requirements for the Master of Arts and Master of Science Degrees 

Advisement. Students newly admitted to the master's degree program are 
advised by the graduate program director, with the assistance of departmental 
faculty. Students choose a permanent adviser at the end of the first semester in 
residence. The choice of permanent adviser and advisory committee is made in 
consultation with the graduate faculty, taking into consideration such matters as 
faculty expertise and faculty advisee loads. 

Degree Requirements. To obtain the master's degree, the student shall: 

1. Complete all degree requirements specified by the Graduate School, and 
explained under degree requirements, master's degree program in the 
Graduate Catalog. 

2. Include as required courses the following: GEOG 500-2, Principles of 
Research, during the first fall semester in residence; GEOG 501-2, Seminar in 
Geographic Research, the following semester; GEOG 410, Techniques in 
Geography; and one research seminar. 

3. In consultation with an adviser, develop a program of study, identifying 
courses to be taken, research skills to be developed, deficiencies to be rectified. 
This shall be approved by the faculty. The program of study shall include a 
core of substantive courses in geography, as explained in the policy 
statement on core curriculum for master's degree students, available from the 
graduate program director. The program of study may include non-geography 
courses. The graduate faculty will meet to review and approve/disapprove 
the program of study of each master's degree student enrolled in GEOG 500. 
An approved program of study will be filed with the graduate program 
director and department chair as part of GEOG 500. 

4. Develop a thesis or research paper proposal. The thesis or research paper 
proposal must be approved by the student's master's advisory committee 
before the student registers for GEOG 599, Thesis or GEOG 593, Research in 
Geography. A total of 4-6 credit hours of GEOG 599 may be awarded for a 
thesis at the discretion of the advisory committee upon final examination on 
the thesis (see #5 below). A total of 2-3 credit hours may be awarded for a 
research paper. 

5. Submit a thesis or research paper to the advisory committee at least 2 weeks 
before the comprehensive examination. A student who writes a thesis will be 
examined by the committee, at a meeting that may be attended by other 
faculty and students. A research paper will be evaluated and approved by the 
advisory committee without public presentation. 

6. Complete a comprehensive examination. The statement of departmental 



128 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

policy on the master's comprehensive examination is available from the 
graduate program director. The comprehensive examination and evaluation 
of thesis or research paper shall be at least 6 weeks prior to the student's 
projected graduation date. Upon approval of the comprehensive examina- 
tion and the thesis or research paper, the advisory committee will request the 
chair of geography forward to the Graduate School the recommendation that 
the master's degree be awarded. 

Master of Science in Education Degree. This degree is available to applicants 
who consider teaching of geography as a career from the College of Education. 
For further details see the program statement for secondary education or higher 
education. 

Accelerated Entry into a Doctoral Program. After completion of one semester of 
residence in the Master of Arts or Master of Science degree program the student 
may petition the graduate faculty for direct entry into the Ph.D. degree program. 
Prerequisite to petition is outstanding performance in GEOG 500, Principles of 
Research as judged by a majority of the faculty and clear promise of early 
development of requisite research skills. Additional evidence of a student's 
readiness to begin doctoral work includes undergraduate and graduate records, 
scores on exams such as the GRE, standardized tests, and reference letters. 
Students must meet all retention and exit requirements for the regular doctoral 
option. The student must submit the application materials required for regular 
admission to the Ph.D. degree program. 

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The doctoral degree in geography is a specialized research degree. The doctoral 
program assumes a broad background comparable to that provided by the 
department's masters core. It is designed to develop a comprehensive yet 
critically analytic knowledge of theory, literature, research design, and applica- 
tion related to environmental analysis, planning, and management. The doctoral 
student will emphasize two subfields in which to propose creative research. 

Advisement. The doctoral student initially is advised by the graduate program 
director. Before the end of the first term of doctoral work, the student will select an 
adviser and they jointly will recommend a doctoral program of study and 
committee members to the graduate faculty for approval. The student and the 
doctoral committee will ascertain appropriate tools and cognate courses; pro- 
ficiency in these will be certified by the doctoral committee. It is recommended 
that all doctoral students have a minimum of one semester of teaching or research 
assistant experience. 

Degree Requirements. To obtain the Doctor of Philosophy degree, the student 
shall: 

1. Complete all degree requirements specified by the Graduate School, and 
explained under degree requirements, doctoral degree program in the 
Graduate Catalog. 

2. Include in the course of study the following: GEOG 500-2, Principles of 
Research during the first fall semester in residence; GEOG 501-2, Seminar in 
Geographic Research in the following semester; GEOG 510, Multivariate 
Techniques in Geography; and 3 research seminars. 

3. Demonstrate a broad background comparable to the department's masters 
program by a procedure to be specified by the graduate faculty. The 
statement of departmental policy on core curriculum for doctoral students is 
available from the graduate program director. 

4. In consultation with an adviser, develop a program of study, identify courses 



Academic Programs Geography / 129 

to be taken, research tools to be developed, general dissertation topic, and 
names of adviser and doctoral committee members. The graduate faculty will 
review the tentative program of study in a meeting at the end of GEOG 500, 
and provide advice for modifications. The graduate faculty will meet at the 
end of GEOG 501 to approve/disapprove the program of study. An approved 
program of study will be filed with the graduate program director and 
departmental chair as part of GEOG 501. 

5. Pass a comprehensive (preliminary) examination. Upon completion of pro- 
gram of study, the student will complete a written and oral comprehensive ex- 
amination in 2 subfields that relate to the student's research emphasis. The 
written portion of the comprehensive examination will be prepared by the 
student's doctoral committee, which will evaluate the performance and judge 
the student's success or failure. The examination then will be circulated to the 
graduate faculty. The oral examination will take place not less than 1 week or 
more than 2 weeks from the time of the written examination. The oral exam- 
ination will be conducted by the student's doctoral committee with appropri- 
ate opportunity for all graduate faculty to ask questions. The student's 
success or failure of the oral examination will be judged by the student's 
doctoral committee. A student who fails the written or oral comprehensive 
examination may retake the examination after appropriate remedial action, 
as specified by the doctoral committee. A student who fails the second written 
or oral examination will be dropped from the doctoral program. 

6. Having passed the comprehensive examination, present a dissertation 
proposal at an open meeting of the Department of Geography. The written 
and oral examination and presentation of the dissertation proposal are 
prerequisite to admission to candidacy. 

7. Complete a dissertation. The student's written dissertation will be circulated 
to members of the doctoral committee at least 2 weeks in advance of the 
proposed dissertation defense. The doctoral committee will issue a public 
invitation a week in advance of the scheduled date of the dissertation 
defense. After necessary revisions have been made, the dissertation will be 
sent to the student's doctoral committee for final approval. The judgment of 
the doctoral committee will be expressed to the student and forwarded to the 
chair of the department for recommendation to the Graduate School for 
conferring of the doctoral degree. 



Geology 



The Department of Geology offers programs leading to the Master of Science 
degree and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in geology. 

Graduate Programs 

The objectives of the graduate degree programs are to develop the student's 
competence in the basic fields of geology and to provide for specialization 
dependent on student and faculty interest. Facilities and staff are available for 
studies involving surface and subsurface mapping, structural geology, petrology, 
paleontology, micropaleontology, paleoecology, coal petrology, coal geology, 
energy resources, stratigraphy, sedimentation, Pleistocene geology, sedimentary 
petrology, sedimentary environments, crystallography, mineralogy, low tempera- 
ture geochemistry, ore deposits, petroleum geology, environmental geology, 
geomorphology, hydrogeology, and applied and solid earth geophysics. Many of 
the faculty are actively conducting research in which statistical and computer 
techniques are applied to problem solving in the earth sciences. Interdisciplinary 
research with other departments is encouraged. 

Southern Illinois and adjacent areas offer a wide variety of geological condi- 



130 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

tions ideal for individual study and research. Experienced staff members work 
closely with students and provide individual assistance when necessary. The 
Illinois State Geological Survey and several major companies in the petroleum 
and coal industries actively support geological work in this area. 

The major thrusts of the Ph.D. degree program focus on the geology of energy 
and mineral resources and geologic aspects related to exploration, development, 
utilization, reclamation, and environmental impact. 

Students must be admitted unconditionally to the Graduate School before they 
can be officially admitted to either graduate program in geology. Admission to 
the graduate programs in geology is based on an evaluation of the preparation, 
ability, and promise of the applicant. Prerequisites for admission include: 1) 
receipt of GRE test scores sent directly to the Department of Geology; the Geology 
Advanced Test is required; 2) completion of department application forms which 
are available on request from the department; and 3) receipt of at least 3 letters of 
recommendation from professors, academic advisers, former employers, or others 
familiar with the applicant's academic performance, research, or other relevant 
work. The Department of Geology normally admits graduate students for 
entrance in the fall semester; rarely will applicants be considered for spring 
admission. The students will be expected to have satisfactorily completed at the 
undergraduate level the equivalent course work in the basic sciences required for 
a Bachelor of Science degree in geology at SIUC. 

A student admitted with course deficiencies may be required to complete or 
audit some undergraduate courses. First year teaching assistants are required to 
enroll in and complete GEOL 500. Other specific requirements will be determined 
by the student's advisory committee and the department chair. Students are 
evaluated on an individual basis, their programs are determined by their career 
goals and the results of informal interviews with individual faculty members. 

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree 

A total of 30 hours of graduate work completed with a grade point average of 3.0 or 
better constitutes the minimum credit requirement for the master's degree. 

Master's students are required to successfully complete GEOL 542A in their 
first year and GEOL 542B in the spring semester of their final year. Other courses 
taken are determined by the student and an advisory committee. The student will 
not be allowed to apply more than 8 hours of independent study, seminar, or 
research courses toward the master's degree (exclusive of thesis credits). 

A student majoring in geology may select a minor field. The minimum course 
work should then include 20 hours of geology and 10 hours in the minor field. 

A thesis subject must be approved by the chair of the advisory committee at 
least 20 weeks before the date of graduation. 

A final oral examination, primarily concerned with defense of the thesis is 
administered as the last step before graduation. The student may be asked any 
questions the committee feels are relevant. 

In order to pass the final oral examination, students must receive a favorable 
majority vote from their thesis committee meeting in formal session. Should the 
student fail the final oral examination, the student, upon concurrence of a 
majority of the committee, may arrange a time for a re-examination not less than 
30 nor more than 120 days after the first examination. Students who fail the final 
orals on their second attempt will be ineligible for the master's degree from the 
Department of Geology. 

Two copies of the approved thesis must be presented to the Graduate School at 
least three weeks prior to graduation, and a third copy must be presented to the 
Department of Geology. 

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

Students entering the doctoral program in geology should meet, as a minimum, 






Academic Programs Geology / 131 

the requirements for the master's degree program listed above. However, 
exceptional students may be considered for direct baccalaureate degree entry or 
accelerated entry into the doctoral program. This requires approval by a majority 
vote of the faculty. 

The Ph.D. degree program in geology is based primarily on the student's 
successful conduct of original research and presentation of an acceptable 
dissertation describing the results of that research. To achieve this goal, the 
student must meet the criteria established by the University, the Graduate 
School, and the Department of Geology as described below. 

Students having completed a master's degree program or its equivalent must, 
upon entering the Ph.D. program, submit themselves to a preliminary counseling 
conference at the beginning of their first semester in the program. The format of 
the preliminary counseling conference is established by the faculty, and a copy of 
the procedures may be obtained in the departmental office. The purpose of this 
conference is to allow the students and their advisers to establish a suitable 
curriculum and research program commensurate with their backgrounds, inter- 
ests, and professional goals. Nevertheless, each student is expected to take 
graduate level courses (excluding readings, independent studies, and internship) 
of at least 3 credits each from at least 4 different faculty members at SIUC, 3 of 
whom must be in the Department of Geology. Students in the Ph.D. program 
must successfully complete GEOL 542B in their last year of residency. The 
normal post-master's credit requirement is 60 semester hours, 30 of which may be 
600 level dissertation credits. 

Before the end of their second year in the program, students shall have (1) 
established a dissertation committee including their adviser and 4 additional 
members, one of whom must be from a department other than geology; (2) 
demonstrated competence in at least one research tool (the student's advisory 
committee will determine the requirements and research tool competence); and (3) 
presented themselves to the advisory committee for a preliminary written and 
oral examination. The format of the preliminary examinations shall be estab- 
lished by the faculty and a copy of the procedures may be obtained in the 
departmental office. Students who fail the preliminary examinations and wish to 
remain in the program may, with faculty consent, retake the examinations 
during one of the next two examination periods. Students who fail the second 
written-oral examination will be dropped from the program. A student having 
passed the preliminary examinations and having demonstrated competence in at 
least one research tool as required by the advisory committee, shall be admitted to 
candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. A second research tool, if required by the advisory 
committee, must be mastered before the candidate may defend the dissertation. 

As a candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in geology, the student is 
expected to make normal progress toward the successful completion and presenta- 
tion of original research. The students must complete all requirements for the 
degree within a 5 year period after admission to candidacy. Ordinarily, the 
doctoral student should expect to spend a minimum of 2 years beyond the 
master's degree, or its equivalent, in residence. Students will be required to 
present an acceptable dissertation describing original research performed with 
minimal supervision and deemed by the advisory committee to be of such quality 
as to merit publication in an appropriate professional journal.* A final oral 
examination will be held after completion of the doctoral dissertation. This 
examination will concentrate on the defense of the dissertation but is not 
restricted to the dissertation topic or area. 

Assistantships 

Teaching assistantships are awarded and supervised by the Department of 
Geology. Research assistantships are usually available only from research 

Two research tools are required. The research tool is a practical knowledge of a foreign language or a computer language. 



132 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

grants of individual faculty members and are supervised by the faculty member 
in receipt of the sponsoring grant. Research assistantship awards require prior 
approval of the assistantship committees of the department. 

As a matter of policy, the Department of Geology does not ordinarily provide 
any student working for a master's degree financial support for more than two 
years. A Ph.D. candidate will not ordinarily be supported for more than 3 years 
post master's or master's equivalent. Requests for relaxation of this policy must 
be made in writing to the department chair. 

Health Education 

The Department of Health Education offers four concentrations for the Master of 
Science in Education degree in health education: school health education, com- 
munity health education, industrial health, and safety education. The de- 
partment participates in the Ph.D. degree in education. Students interested in 
seeking employment in the area of industrial safety or health services adminis- 
tration are encouraged to consult with the chair regarding appropriate courses. 

Master of Science in Education Degree 

Admission. Permission to enter graduate programs in health education is by 
application approval of the department and fulfillment of the following extra 
requirements: 

1. Admission to the Graduate School. 

2. Five letters of reference from persons who can evaluate past performance and 
potential for graduate work should be sent to the office of the department 
chair. 

3. Miller Analogies Test scores must be submitted. Students may take this test 
on the campus of SIUC. 

4. Candidates for the master's degree must have a 2.70 grade point average (A - 
4.0) to be admitted in good standing. Students with grade point averages 
below 2.70 but above 2.40 may petition the department and, if accepted, will 
be admitted conditionally in accordance with regulations of the Graduate 
School. 

Additional admission requirements for the concentration in school health 
education or safety education follow. 

Candidates should be certified for teaching. Exceptions to this requirement 
may be appealed to the academic affairs committee of the department. Students 
enrolled in HED 434 must have psychomotor and communication skills. If 
questions arise concerning an individual student, an assessment will be made if 
necessary minimum psychomotor and communications skills are present. This 
assessment will be utilized to determine whether the individual student possesses 
these basic skills to enter the first aid class. The final assessment of the skills of 
each student will be made by the first aid coordinator in the Department of Health 
Education. 

Additional admission requirements for the concentration in community health 
education: 

1. Candidates must have undergraduate preparation in a discipline providing 
an adequate foundation for graduate work in community health educa- 
tion: i.e., nursing, biological science, health science, or social sciences. 

2. Candidates planning to teach will be expected to meet certification require- 
ments for teachers in Illinois. 

Degree Requirements 

SCHOOL HEALTH AND SAFETY EDUCATION 

In school health and safety education, a minimum of 24 hours in health 



Academic Programs Health Education / 133 

education including a common core of 8 semester hours (533a, b) and a total of 32 
graduate hours are required for the degree. 

COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION 

A total of 40 semester hours, 8 of which must be gained through 1 2 weeks of prac- 
tical fieldwork experience, is required. In addition to the common core courses 
(533a-4 and 533b-4) and a thesis (599-3 to 6), the community health education 
concentration requires HED 401-3, 488-3, 489-3, 500-3, and 526-3. A minimum of 2 
semester hours in communications or group work methods is encouraged. 

INDUSTRIAL HEALTH 

The industrial health option requires a total of 40 semester hours including a 
common core of 8 semester hours (533a,b). A practicum which includes experience 
in industry is required of all candidates. A minimum of 26 hours in health 
education including a common core and the practicum are required for the degree. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Education 

The Department of Health Education participates in the doctoral program in 
education with a concentration in health education. See the description of the 
Ph.D. degree in education. 

Inquiries regarding application should be directed to the chair of the Depart- 
ment of Health Education. 



Higher Education 

Graduate Study in Higher Education 

The Department of Educational Administration and Higher Education provides 
graduate study leading to the Master of Science in Education degree in higher 
education and to a concentration in higher education for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in education. 

The graduate program in higher education offers students an opportunity to 
study and explore the concept of higher education as a field of study. The faculty 
of this program encourages and assists students in developing a lifetime 
commitment to the study of higher education. They also provide pre-service and 
in-service preparation for persons who are teaching or serving as administrators 
or who expect to teach or serve as administrators in two-year and four-year 
colleges and universities, and related post-secondary educational institutions 
and agencies. 

FINANCIAL AID 

The Department of Educational Administration and Higher Education makes an 
effort to find financial support for its graduate students through a number of 
graduate assistantships available throughout the University in different admin- 
istrative offices and residence halls. It assists students in their application for 
fellowships and special awards. Students wishing to expand their administrative 
and teaching skills through a variety of paid experiences should consult their 
academic advisers about possible financial assistance, including graduate 
fellowships. Since a personal interview is required for almost all graduate 
assistantship positions, applicants should arrange to visit the campus as early as 
possible. A very limited number of paid internships are available through 
neighboring institutions. 

THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

The Department of Educational Administration and Higher Education offers a 
program in higher education leading to the Master of Science in Education 



134 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

degree. The emphasis of this degree is to provide individuals with the background 
and skills important to accepting a wide range of teaching and administrative 
positions in higher education. 

Applied tion . Inquiries requesting application materials should be directed to the 
thair of the Department of Educational Administration and Higher Education. 

Admission and Retention. Students applying for admission are encouraged to 
have had some part-time or full-time experience prior to starting graduate study. 
Students who expect to complete a program to prepare them for teaching in a 
community college are expected to have an undergraduate major in a subject area 
commonly taught in a community college. 

Each applicant is considered for acceptance to graduate study on an individual 
basis with much consideration being given to evidence showing the applicant's 
commitment to the field of higher education as a career. 

Each student works closely with an adviser in program preparation. Each 
student also has a committee that assists in reviewing the student's progress, in 
supervising the thesis or research paper, and in administering the final 
examination. The records of each master's degree student are reviewed peri- 
odically by the adviser and committee to determine whether the student should 
continue in the program. 

Program Requirements. Each student will develop, with an adviser, a suitable 
sequence of courses that will be designed to assist the student in attaining 
academic and professional objectives. 

Community Junior College Teaching (32 semester hours, minimum). Students 
who wish to teach in a community college must complete at least 20 semester 
hours in their teaching specialty and at least 12 hours in specified courses in 
educational administration and higher education, for a minimum of at least 32 
semester hours. Students in this program must secure prior to admission a subject 
matter adviser from the faculty of the subject area who will agree to help plan the 
student's academic program. 

The common core of courses required of students in this program includes the 
following: 

EAHE 516-3 College Students and College Cultures 
EAHE 518-3 College Teaching 
EAHE 524-3 Curriculum Design and Policy 
EAHE 526-3 The Community College 

Students must also complete a minimum of 20 semester hours in their teaching 
specialty. The adviser will often recommend additional courses to assist the 
student in meeting special requirements. Recommended courses beyond the 
minimum requirements are: 
EAHE 500-3 Educational Research Methods 
EAHE 595-2 to 6 Internship 

EAHE 592-2 to 3 Special Problems (individual) or 
EAHE 599-3 Thesis 

College Student Personnel (44 semester hours, minimum). Students planning to 
enter positions in college student personnel administration must complete a 
minimum of 44 semester hours of courses with an emphasis in either student 
development or student affairs administration. Those wishing to complete the 
counseling emphasis utilizing additional courses in the Department of Educa- 
tional Psychology should consult the graduate adviser of the College Student 
Personnel program; this will involve completing a double major in higher educa- 
tion and in educational psychology and will consist of 55 semester hours. It 



Academic Programs Higher Education / 135 

should be noted that students in either the student development or administration 
emphases are encouraged to include counseling courses as electives. 

The common core of courses for this program includes (20 semester hours): 
EPSY 402-3 Basic Statistics (a higher level course may be substituted) 
EAHE 500-3 Educational Research Methods 
EAHE 508-2 Student Development Theories 

EAHE 515-3 College Student Development: Operations and Policies 
EAHE 516-3 College Students and College Cultures 
EAHE 535b-2 Higher Education Seminar I: Law and Higher Education 
EAHE 535s-4 Higher Education Seminar I: Professional Seminar in Student 
Affairs 

Additional required courses for specialty in student development: 
EAHE 454-3 Contrasting Philosophies of Education 
EAHE 510-3 Higher Education in the United States 
EAHE 535a-l Higher Education Seminar I: Group Work 
EAHE 595-3 Internship (with emphasis in student development) 
EAHE 592-3 Special Problems (individual) or 
EAHE 599-3 Thesis (with emphasis in student development) 
11 hours of electives 

Additional required courses for specialty in administration: 
C&I 585r-3 CBI-Computer Forecasting in Education 
EAHE 513-3 Organization and Administration in Higher Education 
EAHE 535N-1 Higher Education Seminar I: Supervisory Management 
EAHE 595-3 Internship (with emphasis in administration) 
EAHE 592-3 Special Problems (individual) or 
EAHE 599-3 Thesis (with emphasis in administration) 
1 1 hours of electives 

Students are encouraged to develop flexible programs preparing them in general 
student affairs administration or in one or more of a particular student service 
(i.e., student center, housing, international services, activities, financial assis- 
tance, or alumni affairs). Students are advised to be familiar with the national prep- 
aration standards approved by the Council for the Advancement of Standards 
(CAS). In addition, each student must complete a paid internship experience (usu- 
ally a graduate assistantship). It is recommended that the required credit intern- 
ship experience be in a setting other than where the paid internship is completed. 

Organization and Administration (32 semester hours, minimum). Students 
planning to prepare for careers in academic administration (i.e., academic advis- 
ing, administrative secretary to an academic administrator); in fiscal affairs ad- 
ministration (i.e., bursar, housing, business officer, student center financial officer, 
college purchasing agent); or in general program administration (i.e., administra- 
tion of research, institutional studies, auxiliary enterprises) must complete a 
program of at least 32 semester hours. The common core of this program includes: 
EAHE 500-3 Educational Research Methods 
EAHE 510-3 Higher Education in the United States 
EAHE 513-3 Organization and Administration in Higher Education 
EAHE 516-3 College Students and College Cultures 
EAHE 518-3 College Teaching 

EAHE 595-2 Internship (unless specifically waived because of previous suitable 
work experience) 

Students pursuing this program emphasis should enroll for courses and 
seminars to strengthen their general background and specific skills in keeping 
with their vocational goals. These will include at least 2 hours from one or more of 
the following courses (which are frequently scheduled as two-hour seminars): 
EAHE 535e Higher Education Seminar I: Academic Advisement 
EAHE 545e Higher Education Seminar II: Problems of Central Administration 



136 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

EAHE 545f Higher Education Seminar II: Business and Fiscal Affairs 
EAHE 535b Higher Education Seminar I: Law and Higher Education 

Research Requirements (for all master's degree specializations within higher 
education). Each student shall demonstrate research competencies through 
writing an acceptable research paper or master's thesis. Students who select the 
thesis option must have an approved prospectus on file at least 6 months in 
advance of the anticipated graduation date; they must enroll for 3 hours of EAHE 
599, Thesis; and they must have a committee of at least 3 members. Students who 
elect to write a research paper are not required to register for any credit courses; 
they may, however, elect to enroll for 3 semester hours of EAHE 592, Special 
Problems (individual) for this important activity. 

Students in the community junior college teaching emphasis must submit an 
acceptable research paper on a topic in their subject matter (teaching) field with 
final approval coming from both the adviser in the Department of Educational 
Administration and Higher Education and the representative of the subject area 
department who agrees to work with the student in writing the paper. In 
exceptional cases, the paper may be in higher education instead of the subject 
matter field. 

Students in the college student personnel program usually prepare research 
papers on a topic concerned with student development and related activities. 
However, they do have the option of writing a thesis. 

Students in organization and administration may write a research paper or a 
thesis to demonstrate their research competencies. 

Final Examination and Grade Requirements. All master's degree students are 
required to complete successfully a final examination which may be written or 
oral or both. They must complete at least 21 semester hours of graduate credit 
with grades of A, B, or C in courses graded A through F. Upon successful 
completion of all requirements, including at least a B average for all course work, 
the student is recommended to the Graduate School for graduation. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Education with a Concentration in 
Higher Education 

The Department of Educational Administration and Higher Education partici- 
pates in the doctoral degree program in education with a concentration in higher 
education. 

Admission and Retention. Each applicant is evaluated on an individual basis 
with much consideration being given to evidence of the applicant's commitment 
to higher education as a field of study and as a career. Each applicant should plan 
to visit the campus and interview members of the faculty related directly to the 
higher education doctoral program. Each application is evaluated and acted 
upon by the higher education faculty and by the admission committee of the 
Department of Educational Administration and Higher Education. 

Each student selects a doctoral committee in keeping with the regulations set 
for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in education. This committee of 5 members 
assists the students in selecting a plan of study which meets the minimal 
requirements of the degree and of the program. Requirements beyond the 
minimum may be established by the student's doctoral committee. 

The records of each doctoral student are reviewed annually by the student's doc- 
toral committee to determine whether the student should continue in the program. 

Program Emphasis and Requirements. Earning the doctorate is not dependent 
merely upon the completion of a specific set of courses. Rather, the completion of 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree is based upon the competence of the student 



Academic Programs Higher Education / 137 

relating to the basic writings in the field and upon the student successfully com- 
pleting an original research study of merit. Each student, in collaboration with 
and concurred by the doctoral committee, determines the program of courses, 
which may include work from other departments. An internship may be required 
if the applicant has not had previous professional experience in higher education. 

The basic core courses for the degree include: 
EDUC 590-4 Doctoral Seminar in the Cultural Foundations of Education 
EDUC 591-4 Doctoral Seminar in the Behavioral Foundations of Education 

Higher Education Core-16 hours 
EAHE 510-3 Higher Education in the United States 
EAHE 518-3 College Teaching 

EAHE 550-2 Higher Education Seminar III (Capstone) 
EAHE 589-2 Higher Education Research Seminar 

Two courses chosen from the following 5 courses: 
EAHE 513-3 Organization and Administration of Higher Education 
EAHE 516-3 College Students and College Cultures 
EAHE 524-3 Curriculum Design and Policy 
EAHE 528-3 Finance in Higher Education 
EAHE 554-3 Seminar in Philosophy of Education 

In addition, students, in consultation with their doctoral committees, select a 
program emphasis including a minimum of 16 semester hours beyond the higher 
education core. Each doctoral student must complete at least 40 semester hours of 
course work beyond the master's degree plus 24 semester hours of dissertation. 

Research Requirement. The Ph.D. degree in education is a research-oriented 
degree. The student must demonstrate competency in one or more research tools 
selected in collaboration with and approval by the doctoral committee in keeping 
with the guidelines for the Ph.D. degree in education. The research tools should be 
related to the type of dissertation that is to be submitted and must meet the 
guidelines outlined in the Ph.D. policies and procedures manual for administer- 
ing the Doctor of Philosophy degree in education. If the research tool requirement 
is met by one or more credit courses, such work is above the 64 hours of course 
work noted above. 

Preliminary Examination. The preliminary examination in higher education is 
a comprehensive written examination prepared each semester by a special exam- 
ination committee of the graduate faculty members of the higher education pro- 
gram. The student may also be asked to complete successfully an oral examina- 
tion. Students may petition their doctoral chair to take the examination when 
they have successfully completed the research competency requirements, the 
doctoral seminars, and all or most of the course work listed on the approved 
program. This petition must be submitted during the first week of the semester or 
summer session in which the student plans to take the examination. A person can 
be advanced to candidacy for the degree only upon successful completion of this 
examination and the completion of most of the course work (including courses in 
which the grade of Inc was originally given), the research tools, and the residency 
requirement. Students are allowed 3 chances to pass the preliminary examination. 

Dissertation. The dissertation is the scholarly study of an appropriate research 
problem approved by the student's doctoral committee. A minimum of 24 
semester hours of dissertation credit is required. The committee is composed of at 
least 5 faculty who have graduate faculty status. The chair and 2 other members 
of the committee must be members of the Department of Educational Administra- 
tion and Higher Education; at least 1 other member of the committee must be 
from the College of Education in a department other than educational administra- 



138 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

tion and higher education; and at least 1 other member from an academic unit 
outside the College of Education. 

The student must pass a final oral examination, at which time the dissertation 
is defended. Final approval of the dissertation must be granted by the doctoral 
committee, and 2 unbound copies of the dissertation must be filed with the 
Graduate School. At least 1 bound copy must also be filed with the Department of 
Educational Administration and Higher Education. 



History 

The Department of History offers graduate programs leading to the Master of 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Research Facilities 

Morris Library on the campus is the fourth largest library in Illinois. Housed in a 
modern seven-story building, it contains 2 million volumes and is growing at a 
rate of over 60,000 items per year. Morris Library acquires current scholarly pub- 
lications not only from United States but also from Latin America and European 
publishers. The long-term use of highly specialized materials is afforded by the 
affiliation of Morris Library with the Center for Research Libraries in Chicago. 

The holdings in history and related areas amount to more than 500,000 
volumes. To these must be added 20,000 reels of microfilm containing printed 
secondary works and 6,000 volumes of printed source material and 30,000 
volumes of early American imprints prior to 1800 on microtext. Among the 
materials in the process of acquisition is a microtext edition of all newspapers 
published in the United States prior to 1820. 

The library also possesses substantial holdings in the form of microfilm 
editions of presidential papers, dispatches and instructions of the state depart- 
ment since 1789, massive holdings in consular records, and the Adams family 
papers. The library has been a complete repository of United States government 
documents since 1954 and holds a large collection of earlier documents, including 
a virtually complete Congressional set. With the publication of the Ulysses S. 
Grant papers by the Southern Illinois University Press and the location of the 
Grant Association on the campus, the library is acquiring what will become the 
country's leading collection of Grant books and correspondence. 

Following the acquisition of the 7,000-volume library of Jose Morgrovejo 
Carrion of Ecuador in 1960, the library has systematically expanded its holdings 
in Latin American history, government, literature, and anthropology. The papers 
of Vasquez Gomez, Mexican vice-president (1907-1919), and Samuel Putnam, 
American expert on Latin American affairs, provide rich research opportunities. 
Extensive files of serial publications from Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, 
Cuba, and Mexico also contain diverse sources for investigation. Many of the 
above materials are unavailable elsewhere in the United States. 

Holdings in European history include the standard documentary publications, 
as well as scholarly serials and journals. The materials to support research are 
strongest in modern German and English history. 

Admission 

Graduate work in history is offered at both the master's and the doctoral levels. 
Admission to programs administered by the Department of History must be 
approved by the department, with approval dependent upon the preparation, 
ability, and promise of the individual student. 

M.A.: for the Master of Arts degree major in history, the department's 
admission requirements are those of the Graduate School, except that students 
admitted with a GPA of less than 2.7 must establish a 3.00 GPA in history courses 



Academic Programs History / 139 

in the first semester. The department reserves the right to terminate from the 
history program a student who does not establish and maintain a 3.00 GPA in 
history courses. 

Ph.D: for admission to the doctoral program, each applicant should submit to 
the department, in addition to the material required by the Graduate School, the 
following: three letters from former teachers, preferably at the graduate level; a 
letter in which the applicant expresses professional and personal objectives; and 
a report of the result of the aptitude test (both verbal quantitative) and of the 
Graduate Record Examination. 

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree 

Two programs of study lead to the M.A. degree in history: the thesis and two-field 
options. The thesis option requires a thesis which demonstrates the candidate's 
capacity to carry out independent and original research. A candidate in the thesis 
program should, with the approval of the chair, select a thesis adviser and a 
thesis topic by the end of the first full-time semester in the program. As many as 
six semester hours may be taken in thesis research. 

A candidate must submit an acceptable thesis and pass a comprehensive oral 
examination covering the selected field of concentration and the candidate in the 
thesis program must take at least one research seminar in which a paper will be 
written. 

A candidate in the two-field program must complete two research papers with a 
grade of A or B. These papers are normally to be prepared in the department's 
regularly scheduled research seminars. A copy of one paper must be filed with the 
Graduate School; copies of both papers must be filed with the department. Each 
candidate is required to pass a comprehensive written examination conducted by 
a committee consisting of three persons. The examination will cover two fields 
chosen in consultation with the candidate's committee from the following list. 
United States to 1877 Europe, early modern 

United States, 1865 to present Europe, modern 

Latin America, Colonial England, modern 

Latin America, independent East Asia 

Europe, Mediaeval 

History may be chosen as a minor when a student's program of study allows for 
a graduate minor or as a teaching specialty for the Master of Science in Education 
degree major with a major in secondary education or higher education. 

Students enrolled in the Master of Arts degree program must consult with the 
graduate adviser in the Department of History before registering for courses. 
Students enrolled in either of the Master of Science in Education degree programs 
must consult the history graduate adviser and the appropriate department in the 
College of Education before registration. 

For the Master of Arts degree major in history, 30 semester hours of satisfactory 
graduate work are required; at least 18 of these 30 hours must be on the 500 level. 
Within this general requirement, at least 20 semester hours must be in appropriate 
history courses, with at least 10 of the 20 hours on the 500 level. The remainder of 
the hours may be taken in courses on the 400 level. The M.A. degree student must 
take at least two research seminars in history. 

All candidates for the Master of Arts degree must satisfy the requirement for a 
research tool by demonstrating proficiency in a foreign language or in quantita- 
tive methods (statistics, computer programming, or data management). 

The language research tool option may be fulfilled either by passing Foreign 
Language 488 with a grade of A or B, or by achieving a satisfactory score on the 
Graduate School foreign language test, or by special testing arrangements made 
between the student, the graduate adviser, and the student's adviser. 

Graduate students may demonstrate proficiency in quantitative methods by 
passing two courses with a grade of A or B, from among the following: CS 202; 



140 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2. 

EPSY 506 and 507; POLS 503b; MATH 514, 515, and 516A and B. The courses; 
selected will be determined in consultation among the student, the student's - 
adviser, and the graduate adviser. With the consent of the graduate adviser, other 
courses in statistics and computer science may be accepted in fulfillment of the 
research tool requirement. None of the courses used to satisfy the research tool 
requirement may be counted as part of the thirty semester hours of graduate work 
required for a master's degree. 

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

A student seeking the Ph.D. degree in historical studies must pass preliminary 
examinations and submit a satisfactory dissertation which involves independent 
and original research. In preparing for preliminary examinations, a doctoral 
student must complete at least 24 hours of credit on campus within a period not to 
exceed four calendar years before being admitted to candidacy. The courses and 
hours of credit necessary for a doctoral student to prepare for preliminary exami- 
nations will be determined by the student's advisory committee and must include 
successful completion of four research seminars with grades of A or B. The goal is 
to develop high competence in the selected fields in which the student will be 
examined. Students are responsible for preparing five fields, one of which may be 
outside the field of history. Three of the five fields will be in the broad areas of 
United States, European, Latin American, or Asian history encompassing major 
historical periods; two of the fields will emphasize depth of preparation rather 
than breadth and will normally involve shorter time periods or topical specialties. 
A list of Ph.D. degree fields reflecting the current expertise of the faculty and ap- 
proved by the department's graduate studies committee will be kept on file in the 
office of the graduate adviser and the department chair. Examinations will cover 
four fields and the student can be certified as proficient in the fifth field, providing 
that all courses taken in preparation for that field are passed with grades of A or 
B. Full-time Ph.D. students who have not passed their preliminary examinations 
must take, in each semester, at least six semester hours of graded courses, at least 
three of which must be on the 500 level. Dissertation hours may be taken prior to 
admission to candidacy only with the approval of the graduate studies committee. 

The department requires all candidates to pass a reading examination in two 
foreign languages. With the approval of the department, quantitative methods, 
(statistics, computer programming, or data management) may be substituted for 
one language. Procedures for demonstrating proficiency in foreign language or 
quantitive methods are the same as those required for the Master of Arts degree. 
These requirements must be satisfied prior to the preliminary examinations. 

After completing the course work, fulfilling the foreign language requirements, 
and passing the preliminary examinations, the student will be recommended for 
Ph.D. candidacy and will devote full time to the dissertation. Dissertation 
subjects must be chosen from either United States history, Latin American 
history, or European history. The final oral examination will cover the field of the 
dissertation and related matters. 

Assistantships and Fellowships 

Fellowships and teaching assistantships are available to qualified graduate 
students. All carry stipends and remission of tuition. Application for these 
awards should be submitted by February 1. 

Additional information concerning the graduate program in history may be 
obtained by writing to the chair, Department of History. 



Journalism 

The considerable growth of the mass communication industries has caused an 



Academic Programs Journalism / 141 

increased need for professionally educated men and women with graduate 
degrees who want to pursue careers as journalists in the mass media, communica- 
tion specialists in industry and government, researchers, teachers, and univer- 
sity faculty members. 

Graduate programs in the School of Journalism are designed to help students 
achieve significant intellectual growth as they prepare for these careers. It is 
intended that the student's entire graduate program be a challenging, stimulat- 
ing, and valuable educational experience. For this reason, the School of 
Journalism has 3 degrees, each offering a different approach to graduate 
education. In each degree program, students take some of their work in 
departments other than journalism so that they may explore areas of interest to 
them and inquire into other disciplines. 

The School of Journalism offers graduate programs leading to the Master of 
Arts, the Master of Science, and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees with a major in 
journalism. Available areas of emphasis are: social and behavioral approaches to 
communication processes and effects; media history; and legal studies in mass 
communication. The Master of Arts and Ph.D. degrees are research degrees 
culminating in the preparation of a thesis or dissertation. Students are expected 
to conduct research to provide answers to important questions, to discover new 
information, to show new associations between previously known facts, or to 
supply historical or legal information about particular subjects. 

The Master of Science degree is a media-oriented degree designed to be of 
benefit to individuals who wish to prepare themselves to be more proficient in 
their professions and does not necessarily involve the kind of research required in 
preparing a thesis. 

Admission to the Degree Program 

Persons seeking admission should consult the appropriate section of the 
Graduate Catalog. GRE or GMAT Aptitude Test scores must be submitted before 
a student enters the program. Students without a previous journalism or mass 
communication degree or professional media background are usually required to 
take some undergraduate courses without credit as a way of gaining background. 
The amount of this course work will be determined by an adviser in consultation 
with other faculty members. A TOEFL score of 600 or higher is required of all 
foreign students, except those from English-speaking countries. A minimum 
undergraduate GPA of 3.0 is required for acceptance into the graduate program. 

Academic Retention 

In addition to the retention policies of the Graduate School, the School of Jour- 
nalism requires that each master's degree student must maintain an overall grade 
point average of 3.00 (A = 4) and each Ph.D. student must maintain an overall 
grade point average of 3.25 (A = 4). Upon falling below this average, students will 
be allowed one academic term to bring their averages up to the minimum; failing 
this they will be dropped from the program and will not be allowed to re-apply. No 
course in which the grade is below C shall count toward the degree nor fulfillment 
of any requirement, but the grade will be included in the grade point average. No 
more than 3 hours of C work in graduate courses will count toward either degree. 
All students are subject to regular review by the School of Journalism graduate 
faculty. Those not attaining the minimum acceptable standards or who in any 
way fail to meet any other requirements or standards set by the faculty will be 
dropped as majors. Doctoral students may be required to take extra work if any 
grades of C or lower are earned at SIUC. Students on academic probation are not 
eligible to hold graduate assistantships. 

Master of Arts Degree 

The Master of Arts degree student usually builds on a base of social science and a 



142 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 I 

study of journalism or mass communication leading to a career in teaching, 
scholarship, or applied research in advertising, public relations, media manage- 
ment, opinion research, or similar areas. The degree also may lead to Ph.D. 
studies. 

Candidates for the M. A. degree must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours i 
of graduate work, including 3 hours for the thesis. Additional courses may be 
required if students change their areas of interest or if performance in course work 
indicates the need for more course work. No fewer than 18 nor more than 21 
semester hours of course work must be earned in journalism. Remaining course 
credits should be taken in departments whose disciplines have strong theoretical 
bases. Courses in some departments may not, therefore, be used to meet 
requirements. Students often elect courses in history, psychology, political 
science, sociology, anthropology, economics, and guidance. 

Each student is required to prepare, write, and defend a thesis which 
demonstrates a capacity for investigation and independent thought. Students 
must be enrolled for thesis credit during the semester they defend their theses. 

Failure to present and defend an acceptable thesis proposal, or failure to 
maintain continuous progress toward completion of degree requirements serve as 
reasons for dismissing a student from the program. Additional work may be 
required of those students whose progress is interrupted. 

Master of Science Degree 

The Master of Science degree program with a major in journalism provides 
advanced professional training for careers in the mass media and related areas. 
Persons with graduate degrees from accredited schools of journalism are in 
demand by newspapers, magazines, broadcasting, advertising and public 
relations firms, government, and industry. The growing complexity of com- 
munication increases the need for persons sensitive to the intricacies of 
communicating via the mass media. 

The Master of Science degree work consists of 2 separate programs. They are 
broadly based and draw upon the resources of a diverse and knowledgeable 
journalism faculty and upon many other academic areas in the University. From 
such resources, the School of Journalism provides individually developed 
programs for graduate students aiming at such careers as newspaper reporting, 
radio and television news, advertising, public relations, magazine editing, media 
management, and teaching. 

PROGRAM A 

Thirty semester hours are required for the Master of Science degree in program A, 
including 3 hours for thesis or professional project, whichever the student 
chooses. From 15 to 21 semester hours of course work must be earned in 
journalism including one research course. Remaining semester hours should be 
taken in a discipline or disciplines appropriate to the student's area of study. 
Students must successfully complete 6 hours of written master's comprehensive 
examinations and a two-hour oral. Formal, oral defense both of the thesis or 
project proposal and of the completed thesis or project is required. 

PROGRAM B 

Program B requires 36 semester hours of course work, but the student writes a 
research paper instead of a thesis or master's project. The research paper is 
normally an extension of the requirements for a specific course of the student's 
choosing. From 15 to 21 hours of course work must be earned in journalism 
including one research course. Remaining semester hours should be taken in a 
discipline or disciplines appropriate to the student's area of study. Students must 
successfully complete 6 hours of written master's comprehensive examinations 
and a two-hour oral. 



Academic Programs Journalism / 143 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

rhe Ph.D. degree program is designed to produce scholars and teachers who can 
make significant contributions to the understanding and development of the 
mass media and their utilization. Doctoral studies include the entire process of 
nass communication, including communication theory, media history, mass 
nedia law, and mass media institutions and their interrelationships with other 
societal institutions. The program asks students to achieve breadth in their 
studies, but allows each student to develop a special area of interest and research. 

Normally, 3 years of concentrated study, including preparation of a disserta- 
ion, will be required to earn the degree, which is built on the base of a suitable 
naster's degree program. 

Minimum course requirements for the Ph.D. degree include 38-40 semester 
lours beyond the master's degree, including basic foundations in mass communi- 
cation theory and research methods (JRNL 500 and 504). In addition, programs 
)f study will include 2 appropriate research tools, as described below. All doctoral 
students must complete a graduate course in media law and a graduate 
nferential statistics course (GUID 506). An evaluation of previous work is made 
md transfer credit is allowed only for work which fits the degree plan. 
Approximately two-thirds of course credit hours will be earned in journalism and 
nass communication; the remaining hours will be earned in a nonjournalism 
irea of study, which might include work in more than one department. Ad- 
litional course work may be required if the student's area of interest changes or if 
)erformance in courses or comprehensive examination results indicate the need. 

During the second semester of enrollment, each Ph.D. student will prepare a 
otal program plan for the degree and secure sponsorship by a dissertation 
:ommittee chair. The plan should include a list of courses and tools, with some 
ixplanation and justification for their selection in relation to academic goals. The 
)lan will be discussed and modified, when appropriate, before approval. Once 
ipproved, the plan may be changed only with permission of the adviser. The 
tudent may deviate from the 2/3-1/3 pattern if the resulting program contains 
vork leading to appropriate research or professional career goals. 

r ool Requirements. Minimum course requirements listed above do not include 

ourses taken to satisfy tool requirements. The Ph.D. student, in consultation 

vith the adviser, will select 2 useful tools from among: 

tesearch Design— JRNL 501 

iistoriography— JRNL 530 

^egal Research— JRNL 540 

>tatistics— GUID 506 and 507 

Computer Science — Courses to be selected 

Modern Foreign Language — Standard Proficiency Examination 

Courses listed as tools are subject to change without notice at times when 
epartments change course content, titles, or numbers. Only grades A or B are 
Lccepted for tool courses. 

A student may propose other research tools for consideration by the School of 
ournalism, but such tools must be useful in the conduct of research, especially for 
he doctoral dissertation. 

Examinations. Each student must pass rigorous comprehensive written and 
ral examinations after completing tool requirements and all course work (with 
.11 incomplete and deferred grades removed). The examination must be completed 
within one year after the student has satisfied all course and tool requirements. 
if ailure to successfully complete the exams during the one-year period will result 
p dismissal from the program. While the form and scope of the examinations are 
it the discretion of the graduate faculty members of the School of Journalism, 



144 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2\ 

within basic parameters, the examinations comprehensively test the student's 
understanding of communication and communication research. Each studenti 
takes a minimum of 20 hours of exams including an outside area. 

Students prepare dissertation proposals, defend and explain the proposals! 
before their committees and complete the research and write their dissertations. 
Within one year after admission to candidacy, students must have writteni 
dissertation proposals approved by their committees. Dissertations must be 
based on scholarly research and independent thought. 

Students must enroll for a minimum of 24 hours in JRNL 600. Each student] 
must enroll in JRNL 600 each term between admission to candidacy and} 
completion of all requirements for the Ph.D. degree. 

Graduate students who have completed their course work and the minimum I 
number of credits required for thesis or dissertation must enroll in JRNL 601, 
Continuing Research, each semester until the completion of their degree 
programs. 

The dissertation defense will be before members of the dissertation committee 
(all of whom must be present) and interested observers. Although others than 
committee members may ask questions of the student, the pass or fail decision on 
the oral will be made by committee members only. 

Linguistics 

The goal of the Department of Linguistics is to bring students to an understand- 
ing of language systems which is both theoretical and practical. For students] 
committed to the study of language, the department offers 2 M.A. degree 
programs: the M.A. degree in English as a foreign language and the M.A. degree 
in applied linguistics. Students whose career goals are to enter the large and 
increasing job market of teaching English as a foreign/ second language, to help 
train other teachers, and to develop curricula and teaching materials may select 
either the one-year (i.e., three-semester) program in English as a foreign/ second 
language or the two-year program in applied linguistics with a concentration in 
teaching English as a second or foreign language. This second option is for those 
interested in a more detailed study of the issues, theories, and concepts involved 
in linguistics and second language acquisition. In this two-year program 
students are exposed to current research through seminars and other advanced 
courses and through the writing of a thesis in an area related to second language 
teaching and learning. 

The other options offered in the M.A. degree in applied linguistics are in these 
concentrations: phonetics/phonology, syntax/ semantics, psycholinguistics, and 
linguistic variation (historical or sociolinguistics). These options include all the 
content of a traditional program in theoretical linguistics as well as an applied 
linguistics focus. For students who are interested in language study but not 
committed to either of our graduate majors, the department offers a number of 
interesting, non-specialist courses which may serve as electives in related degree 
programs, such as communication disorders and sciences, psychology, English, 
foreign languages, speech communication, and anthropology. A sequence of 
courses is also available for those wishing to pursue a double major combining 
English as a foreign language or applied linguistics with other programs at the 
master's level. Applicants for admission should send inquiries to the chair, 
Department of Linguistics, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbon- 
dale, IL 62901. 

Admissions 

Applicants for admission to either degree program, in addition to meeting the 
general conditions for admission to the Graduate School, are expected to have 



Academic Programs Linguistics / 145 

undergraduate GPA's of at least 3.0 (A = 4.0). Applicants with GPA's below 3.0 
may be granted conditional admission. (Students admitted on a conditional basis 
must earn a graduate GPA of 3.0 after the first 10 hours of letter-graded course 
work taken in their program; failure to do so will result in the student's being 
dropped from the program.) In addition, applicants who are not native speakers 
of English must have a TOEFL score of at least 570. Although submission of GRE 
scores is not required for admission to the Graduate School or to the department, 
applicants are advised that high GRE scores can be helpful in competition for 
University fellowships or departmental assistantships. Lacking an undergradu- 
ate major in linguistics or English as a foreign language, applicants are advised 
that preparation in related fields is desirable. 

All students entering either the M.A. degree in applied linguistics or the M.A. 
degree in English as a foreign language programs must demonstrate a minimum 
level of knowledge of traditional English grammar. This is tested by a depart- 
mental diagnotic examination administered to all students at the beginning of 
their first term. Students not able to pass the test will be required to take an 
undergraduate course in English grammar and pass the course with a grade of B 
or better. This course cannot count toward a graduate degree in EFL or applied 
linguistics. 

Applicants for admission must also demonstrate spoken and written pro- 
ficiency in English, which is measured by departmental diagnostic examinations 
given upon the student's arrival. Students not able to pass these tests must take 
(suitable remedial work provided for by the department. 

Retention 

Students admitted on a conditional basis must earn a graduate GPA of 3.0 after 
the first 10 hours of letter-graded course work taken in their programs; failure to 
do so will result in the student's being dropped from the program. 

If, after one term on academic probation, as defined either by the Graduate 
School or herein, any students who fail to return to good standing will not be 
entitled to financial assistance from the department. If, after 2 terms on academic 
probation, they fail to return to good standing, they will be dropped from the 
program. 

When students accumulate 3 or more incompletes, they will be put on academic 
probation and will return to good standing by reducing the number of incompletes 
to 2 or less. While on academic probation the student is subject to the above 
stipulations for financial assistance and for being dropped from the program. 

The core courses (LING 401, 402a, and 570), as required by a student's 
particular program, must be passed with a grade of at least B. These courses may 
be repeated once in order to fulfill that requirement. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Toward the end of their course work, students must take and pass a written 
examination covering the areas of their concentration. This examination may 
not be taken more than twice. In order to be eligible to take the examination, 
department students must have at least a 3.0 GPA when the examination is 
given, and must have passed the test of traditional English grammar. Students 
having a GPA just below 3.0 may petition the department's executive committee 
to be considered for a special waiver of the requirement. However, petitioning the 
committee does not automatically result in a waiver. 

Minimum Grades in Core Courses 

All students in the M.A. degree in an EFL program must receive a minimum 
grade of B or better in the following core courses: LING 401, LING 402a, and 
LING 570. All students in the M.A. degree in applied linguistics program must 
receive a minimum grade of B or better in the following core courses: LING 401 



146 Graduate Catalog Chapter*. 

and LING 402a. This regulation also applies to students in either program whd 
took the courses in question as undergraduate students. 

Students who receive a grade lower than B must take the course again. Thejs 
will register officially for the course; this requires a letter of permission from thM 
department. Both grades will be counted in the student's GPA. 

The courses in question must be completed with a minimum grade of B before 
the student takes the comprehensive examinations. Students repeating th( 
course during the term in which they wish to take the comprehensive examina 
tions must have a letter from the course teacher indicating that they have £ 
current grade standing of at least a B. 

Students who are repeating any of these courses may take courses concurrently 
or sequentially for which these courses are prerequisities before getting ar 
acceptable grade. 

Grade Point Average to Graduate 

All graduate work must be completed with an overall GPA of 3.0. 

Master of Arts Degree in English as a Foreign Language 

Applicants for admission to the English as a foreign language program who are 
not native speakers of English should have an undergraduate concentration in 
English language or literature, or the equivalent in practical experience. 

The EFL program at SIUC is uniquely different from many such programs in 
the way it blends theory and practical matters; it prepares students intellectually 
as well as experientially, so that they will be capable not only of conducting a 
class in English, but of making the decisions necessary for choosing among 
competing approaches, conflicting situations, and unforeseen activities. The 
methodology courses of the EFL program provide a blend of theory and practice 
in the study of EFL/ESL. Thus, graduates of this program are prepared tc 
participate in teacher-training as well as to be classroom teachers. 

As a vital part of the graduate training program in EFL, all students in that 
program are required to engage in practice teaching assignments through en- 
rollment in LING 581 (practicum in EFL/ESL: oral English) and LING 585 
(practicum in EFL/ESL: written English). Waivers may be given according to 
departmental guidelines. These courses are designed to enable the student to 
carry out practice teaching responsibilities in the LING 100 (oral English), LING 
101, 105, 290 (composition for foreign students), classes in oral or written English 
at CESL, tutorial work in the English remedial workshop, (i.e., the writing clinic 
or developmental skills), or other appropriate courses. The purpose of these 
practice courses and practice teaching assignments is to expose students to some 
of the types of teaching activities they will ultimately be engaged in after they 
receive their degrees. 

The total credit hour requirement is a minimum of 32 credit hours. A minimum 
of 15 of these hours must be at the 500 level. 

Required Courses (16 semester hours) 

LING 401-4 General Linguistics 

LING 402a-3 Articulatory Phonetics 

LING 570-4 Theory and Methods of EFL/ESL 

LING 581-2 Practicum in EFL/ESL: Oral English 

LING 585-3 Practicum in EFL/ESL: Written English 

The remaining 16 semester hours in the M.A. degree in an EFL program are to 
be selected from 2 groups of courses within the departmental offerings. Occasion- 
ally courses from related departments are used to complete elective requirements 
where such courses are appropriate to the student's area of specialization. 

All EFL students who are native speakers of English must have the equivalent 
of 1 semester of study of a modern language (including exotic language) within 



Academic Programs Linguistics / 147 

the preceding 5 years (excluding high school). This study may have been 
academic or direct experience (living in another country) with formal study (e.g., 
Peace Corps classes, FSI, Army language schools). In default of such background, 
the student must register for at least one semester of study of a modern language 
at SIUC. Enrollment in an undergraduate level course for credit or for audit 
satisfies the requirement. Students who are not native speakers of English, in 
recognition of their experience in learning English, are exempted from this 
requirement. 

A thesis is not required for the M.A. degree in English as a foreign language; 
however, a candidate for this degree may optionally choose to write a thesis. In 
that case, the thesis policy and guidelines for the M.A. degree in applied 
linguistics apply. A research report is required in lieu of a thesis. The research 
report may have been prepared as a term paper for any advanced course, must 
have earned an A or B, must give evidence of the candidate's ability to do research 
reporting, and must be in acceptable form. In addition to the copy required by the 
Graduate School, the student must submit a copy to the department. 

A certificate of attendance may be granted to those students who do not satisfy 
the graduation GPA requirement (3.0), the comprehensive examination require- 
ment, the English language proficiency requirement, or the traditional English 
grammar proficiency requirement. 

Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics 

The Master of Arts degree with a major in applied linguistics encompasses a 
broad range of core courses in linguistics plus an in-depth sequence of courses in 1 
of 5 concentrations chosen by the student: TEFL/TESL, phonology, syntax/ 
semantics, psycholinguistics, or linguistic variation. A minimum of 45 credit 
hours is required for the applied linguistics concentration; at least 15 of these 
must be at the 500 level. 

Core Requirements (22-25 credit hours). 

LING 401-4 General Linguistics 

LING 402a-3 Phonetics 

LING 406-3 Introduction to Historical Linguistics (optional for TEFL/TESL 

concentration) 

LING 405-4 Phonological Theories 

LING 408-4 Syntactic Theory 

LING 415-3 Sociolinguistics 

LING 445-4 Introduction to Psycholinguistics 

In each concentration students are required to take 3-7 additional credit hours 
beyond these core requirements. The 3-7 hours vary according to the concentra- 
tion. Among the requirements and electives are the following: 
TEFL/TESL: Theory and Methods in EFL/ESL, Innovative Methods, Notional/ 
Functional Syllabus, Language Testing, Materials Preparation. 
PHONOLOGY: Phonology Seminar, Acoustic Phonetics, Contrastive Linguis- 
tics, English Phonology. 

SYNTAX/SEMANTICS: Syntax Seminar, Language Families, Structure of the 
English Verb, Stylistics. 

PSYCHOLINGUISTICS: Second Language Acquisition, Psycholinguistics Sem- 
inar, Language and Cognition, Developmental Psychology. 
LANGUAGE VARIATION: Historical Linguistics, Sociolinguistics Seminar, 
Dialectology, Language Planning, Pidgins and Creoles. 

Electives may be selected from courses offered within the department, or from 
appropriate offerings from other units (e.g., anthropology, communication 
disorders and sciences, computer science, education, English, foreign languages 
and literatures, philosophy, and speech communication psychology). Where 
appropriate, students are encouraged to include courses in research methodology, 



148 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

statistics, and other empirical research techniques. Students are encouraged to 
attend summer institutes sponsored by the Linguistic Society of America or the 
international TESOL organization; credit will be allowed for course work 
successfully completed. 

A thesis is required for the M. A. degree with a major in applied linguistics. Work 
on the required thesis may be counted for from 3 to 6 credit hours in this degree 
program. The student, in consultation with a graduate adviser, shall propose a 
topic and a thesis committee consisting of a chair and 2 other faculty members to 
serve as the thesis committee; the executive committee of the department must 
approve the topic and structure of the thesis committee. The chair is to be a 
member of the graduate faculty of the Department of Linguistics. One or both of 
the other committee members may be from outside the department. In addition to 
the 2 copies required by the Graduate School and any requested by committee 
members, the student must submit a copy of the thesis to the department. 

Candidates for this M.A. degree must have current proficiency in a language 
other than English; this may be native proficiency or the equivalent of the 
proficiency expected after 3 academic years of course work. Such proficiency is 
demonstrated by obtaining at least a grade of B in the appropriate FL 488b course 
or by obtaining a score of at least 500 on any option of the Graduate School 
Foreign Language Test given by the Educational Testing Service. 

Manufacturing Systems 

Master of Science in Manufacturing Systems 

Graduate work leading to a Master of Science degree in manufacturing systems is 
offered by the College of Engineering and Technology. The objective of the pro- 
gram is to develop manufacturing professionals who can design and implement 
modern manufacturing systems to increase productivity and improve product 
quality. Course offerings and research are available in manufacturing processes 
and control, quality control, and computer applications. The program provides ad- 
vanced education for students with baccalaureate degrees in technology and also 
an excellent continuing education opportunity for individuals with technical de- 
grees who wish to expand their education in the area of manufacturing systems. 

Admission 

Candidates for this program must be accepted by the Graduate School and the 
Department of Technology. Candidates should possess a bachelor's degree with a 
major in a technical area and have a GPA of no less than 3.0/4.0. A student whose 
undergraduate training is deficient may be required to take additional courses to 
compensate for deficiencies identified by the technology graduate program 
committee. 

Program Requirements 

The program in the thesis option requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of 
acceptable graduate credit, 18 semester hours of which is in manufacturing 
systems. 

Students will complete a master's thesis, having 6 semester hours of credit, and 
be required to pass a comprehensive examination covering all of the student's 
graduate work and thesis. 

Within the 30 semester hour requirement, students must complete the following 
core courses or their equivalents: 
MATH 458-3 Statistical Methods in Business 
MFGS 510-3 Recent Advances in Quality Assurance 
MFGS 520-3 Computer- Aided Manufacturing II 
MFGS 540-3 Product Reliability Theory 



Academic Programs Manufacturing Systems / 149 

MFGS 560-3 Automated Factory Technology 

A program of study including the above required courses (15 semester hours), 
the master's thesis (6 semester hours), and the remaining 9 semester hours will be 
selected by the graduate adviser and the student. 

If a student prefers the non-thesis option, a minimum of 36 semester hours of 
acceptable graduate credit including the 15 semester hours of core courses is 
required. The student is expected to take at least 21 semester hours within the 
major department including no more than 3 semester hours of MFGS 592 to be 
devoted to the preparation of a research paper. In addition, each candidate is 
required to pass a written comprehensive examination. 

Each student will select a minimum of 3 technology graduate faculty members 
to serve as a graduate committee, subject to approval of the director of the 
graduate program. The committee will: 

1. approve the student's program of study, 

2. approve the student's research paper topic, 

3. approve the completed research paper, and 

4. administer and approve the written comprehensive examination. 

Additional Information 

Teaching or research assistantships and fellowships are available for qualified 
applicants. Additional information about programs, courses, assistantships, and 
fellowships may be obtained from the College of Engineering and Technology or 
from the chair of the department. 



Mathematics 

Graduate work in mathematics is offered leading to the Master of Science, Master 
of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in mathematics and the Master of 
Science degree in statistics. Students interested in the teaching of mathematics 
may select a minor concentration in education within the Master of Science 
degree in mathematics. Minor work for graduate degrees in other fields, which 
allow for a minor, is also offered. 

Acceptance for graduate study in mathematics and subsequent continuation in 
the graduate program are at the discretion of the Department of Mathematics, 
provided that the student has been admitted to the Graduate School and meets 
the retention standards of the Graduate School. In addition to general rules, 
regulations, and requirements of the Graduate School, the following specific 
requirements pertain to the degrees available in mathematics. 

Master of Science Degree in Mathematics 

Students will be considered for acceptance into the M.S. degree in mathematics 
program if they have completed an undergraduate major in mathematics or a 
strong undergraduate minor in mathematics together with a major in a closely 
related discipline. 
Once accepted, the requirements are as follows: 

1 . The candidate must complete a total of at least 30 semester hours of graduate 
credit of which at least 15 must be at the 500 level and at least 21 must be in 
courses (exclusive of 400, 417, 511, 512, 513) offered by the Department of 
Mathematics. A minor concentration may be taken outside of the department 
if approved by the graduate adviser. A minor concentration of up to 9 hours 
chosen from MATH 511, 513 or from the Department of Curriculum and In- 
struction will be allowed for candidates interested in mathematics education. 

2. The candidate's program must include at least one 400- or 500-level course 
from each of 4 of the following areas: (1) pure and applied algebra; (2) pure 
analysis; (3) applied analysis; (4) geometry and topology; (5) probability and 



150 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

stastitics. This requirement may be met in whole or in part by means of ; 
equivalent courses taken elsewhere prior to acceptance for graduate study in 
the department. 

3. The candidate must attend at least 10 departmental colloquia. 

4. The candidate must prepare a research paper or thesis (3 hours credit in 
MATH 595 or 599) under the supervision of a research adviser and two other 
faculty members from the department. This committee will be appointed by 
the graduate adviser after consultation with all those involved. 

5. The candidate must demonstrate satisfactory performance on a final oral 
examination covering the graduate course work and the research paper or 
thesis. This examination will be conducted by the 3 members of the 
candidate's committee and moderated by the research adviser. The student 
will pass the examination if the research adviser and at least 1 of the other 2 
committee members so agree. 

Master of Science Degree in Statistics 

Students will be considered for acceptance into the M.S. degree in statistics 
program if they have completed an undergraduate major in either statistics or 
mathematics or a strong undergraduate minor in mathematics together with a 
major in a closely related discipline. 
Once accepted, the requirements are as follows: 

1 . The candidate must complete a total of at least 30 semester hours of graduate 
credit of which at least 15 must be of the 500 level, at least 21 must be in 
courses offered by the Department of Mathematics, and at least 6 in an 
approved minor area outside the department. 

2. The candidate's program must include: 

a. In mathematics: 452 or 501, and at least one course in applied analysis 
(e.g., 406, 409, 450, 455, 475a,b). 

b. In statistical theory: 480 or 483, and 580. 

c. In statistical methods: 484 and at least 3 hours chosen from 473, 485, or 
582. This requirement may be met in whole or in part by means of equivalent 
courses taken elsewhere prior to acceptance for graduate study in the 
department. 

3. The candidate must demonstrate a proficiency in computer programming. 
This requirement may be met by passing with a grade of B or better CS 202 
and either CS 220 or by passing a suitable examination given by a faculty 
member from the Department of Mathematics who has been appointed by 
the graduate adviser. 

4. The candidate must attend at least 10 departmental colloquia. 

5. The candidate must prepare a research paper or thesis (3 hours credit in 
MATH 595 or 599) under the supervision of a research adviser and two other 
faculty members from the department. This committee will be appointed by 
the graduate adviser after consultation with all those involved. 

6. The candidate must demonstrate satisfactory performance on a final oral 
examination covering the graduate course work and the research paper or 
thesis. This examination will be given by the 3 members of the candidate's 
committee and chaired by the research adviser. 

Master of Arts Degree in Mathematics 

Students will be considered for acceptance into the M.A. degree in mathematics 
program if they have completed with distinction the equivalent of a strong under- 
graduate major in mathematics. Once accepted, the requirements are as follows: 

1. The candidate must complete a total of 30 semester hours of graduate level 
mathematics courses of which at least 15 must be at the 500 level. 

2. The candidate must complete with a grade of B or better each of the courses 
MATH 419, 421, 433, 452, and at least 3 of the courses MATH 501, 519, 530, 



Academic Programs Mathematics / 151 

555. This requirement may be met in whole or in part by means of 
equivalent courses taken elsewhere. 

3. The candidate must demonstrate the ability to read mathematical 
literature in French, German, or Russian. This may be certified by passing 
with a grade of B or better the research tool course 488 offered by the 
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, by passing with a score 
of 465 or better an examination given by the Educational Testing Service of 
Princeton, NJ, or by passing a suitable examination given by a faculty 
member from the Department of Mathematics who has been approved by the 
graduate adviser. 

4. The candidate must attend at least 10 departmental colloquia. 

5. The candidate must prepare a thesis (3 hours credit in MATH 599) under 
the supervision of a thesis adviser and 2 other faculty members from the 
department. This committee will be appointed by the graduate adviser after 
consultation with all those involved. 

6. The candidate must demonstrate satisfactory performance on a final 
oral examination covering the graduate course work and the thesis. This 
examination will be given by the 3 members of the candidate's committee 
and chaired by the thesis adviser. The student will pass the examination if 
the thesis adviser and at least 1 of the other 2 committee members so agree. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

Students will be considered for acceptance into the doctoral program if they have 
completed with distinction a graduate program comparable to that required for a 
master's degree in mathematics, statistics, or computer science at SIUC. 
Additional evidence of outstanding scholarly ability or achievement (e.g., a high 
score on the advanced section of the Graduate Record Examination or published 
research papers of high quality) will lend strength to the application. 
Once admitted, the requirements are as follows: 

1. The candidate must pass the departmental qualifying examination by the 
end of the February following the second fall semester in the doctoral 
program. This qualifying examination, which is given twice annually in 
February and September, covers 3 areas each of which is commensurate with 
a regularly scheduled 500 level graduate course at SIUC. After consultation 
with the graduate adviser candidates will choose the 3 areas over which they 
are to be examined, with 2 of 3 chosen from MATH 501, 520, 530, 555, 580. The 
third area normally corresponds to another regularly scheduled 500 level 
mathematics course but with the approval of the graduate adviser the third 
area may be chosen from a related field outside the department. A candidate 
who fails the qualifying examination within the alloted time will be dropped 
from the doctoral program. 

2. The candidate must demonstrate competence with two research tools. The 
ability to read mathematics in any one of the languages French, German, or 
Russian serves as a tool. This may be certified by passing with a grade of B or 
better the research tool course 488 offered by the Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages and Literatures, by passing with a score of 465 or better an examina- 
tion given by the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, N J, or by passing 
a suitable examination given by a faculty member from the Department of 
Mathematics who has been appointed by the graduate adviser. A proficiency 
in computer programming will also serve as a research tool. This may be certi- 
fied by passing with a grade of B or better CS 202 and either CS 204 or by pass- 
ing a suitable examination given by a faculty member from the Department 
of Mathematics who has been appointed by the graduate adviser. 

3. The candidate must complete a major (12 hours) and two minors (6 hours 
each) chosen from the following list: algebra, analysis, applied mathematics, 
combinatorics, differential equations, number theory, numerical analysis, 



152 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 ] 

probability and statistics, topology, and geometry. The course work in the 
major and minor areas must be at the 500 level and exclusive of the courses 
used to satisfy the qualifying exam. 

4. The candidate must attend at least 20 departmental colloquia. 

5. The candidate must file a request with the graduate adviser to appoint a 
dissertation committee to supervise the remaining doctoral work. This 
committee shall consist of 5 members with the candidate's dissertation 
adviser as chair. At least one member of the committee must represent each 
of the minor areas, and the dissertation adviser and one other member will 
represent the major area. One member of the committee will be chosen from 
outside of the department. This committee will be appointed by the graduate 
adviser after consultation with the candidate, the proposed dissertation 
adviser, the department chair, and the other faculty members involved. 

6. The candidate must pass a preliminary examination over the major and 
minor areas. This examination will normally be given after satisfying the 
research tools requirement and within 18 months after passing the qualifying 
examination. The preliminary examination will consist of a written exami- 
nation over the major area and an oral examination over the major and the 
two minor areas. This examination will be prepared, administered, and 
evaluated by the dissertation committee. Any member of the graduate fac- 
ulty may attend the oral portion of the preliminary examination and (at the 
discretion of the committee chair) question the candidate. The candidate will 
pass the preliminary examination provided that 4 members of the committee 
including the chair so agree. A report on the examination will be included 
with the candidate's official academic records. In the event that the 
candidate's performance is unsatisfactory, the committee as a whole shall 
decide on the time and content of an appropriate re-examination. 

In unusual circumstances a candidate who has passed the preliminary 
examination may wish to change the major area or dissertation adviser. This 
will be allowed if the graduate adviser and department chair so agree in 
which case the dissertation committee will be reconstituted in an appropriate 
manner. The revised committee may then prescribe additional course work 
and require the candidate to retake the preliminary examination. 

7. The candidate must be officially admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. 
This will be done after all of the above requirements have been met. 

8. The candidate must complete a dissertation (representing at least 24 hours in 
MATH 600) under the supervision of the candidate's dissertation adviser. 
The dissertation adviser and the other 4 members of the dissertation 
committee will evaluate the quality of the completed work which must 
conform to high literary and scholastic standards and constitute an original 
and publishable contribution to mathematics. A final oral examination will 
be conducted by the dissertation committee. During this examination the 
candidate will first present the major results of the dissertation and then 
respond to questions. Any member of the University graduate faculty may 
attend and (at the discretion of the dissertation adviser) ask related 
questions. The dissertation will be accepted provided the dissertation adviser 
and at least 3 of the other 4 members of the committee so agree. 

Practicum. Every graduate student in mathematics is expected to develop the 
ability to communicate mathematical concepts orally in a professional environ- 
ment. In keeping with this requirement, the graduate adviser will assign to each 
graduate student a suitable professional duty (e.g., participation in a research 
seminar, teaching an undergraduate class under faculty supervision, conducting 
help sessions for undergraduate students, serving as a team member on a 
research project) each semester of enrollment in one of the four graduate degree 
programs offered by the department. 



Academic Programs Mathematics / 153 



Microbiology 

The Department of Microbiology offers graduate work leading to the Master of 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in microbiology. The programs are 
designed to provide advanced training in bacteriology, genetics, immunology, 
microbial physiology, molecular biology, and virology. Both programs involve 
in-depth research. 

Admission, Advisement, and General Requirements 

Prospective graduate students must submit 2 separate application forms, 1 for the 
Graduate School and the other for the Department of Microbiology. Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) scores and 3 letters of recommendation are required 
as part of the departmental application. 

Prerequisites for graduate training in microbiology include the equivalent of an 
undergraduate major in one of the biological sciences plus one year each of or- 
ganic chemistry, physics, and suitable university level mathematics. Deficiencies 
in these requirements must be made up early in graduate training. In addition, 
students without a microbiology background will be required to take Microbiology 
301 and obtain a grade of at least B, or pass an equivalent proficiency examina- 
tion with a grade of 80% or better during the first week of the entering semester. 

Admission to the master's degree program requires a minimum grade point 
average (GPA) of 2.70 (A - 4.00) on all undergraduate work. Selected students can 
be admitted directly to the doctoral program through the Ph.D. accelerated entry 
option. For all other students admission to the doctoral program requires a 
master's degree or its equivalent and a minimum GPA of 3.25 in all graduate 
course work. All admissions are subject to final approval by the department. 

The departmental graduate adviser will assist each student with the initial 
planning of a program of study, including required courses, anticipated dates for 
fulfillment of specified requirements, etc. The adviser will also organize and 
supervise MICRO 501 , Preprofessional Training, a one hour course required of all 
incoming microbiology graduate students. Similarly the adviser will also assist 
the student in arranging for a graduate faculty advisory committee and its chair 
to assume the continuing responsibility of planning the program of study and 
directing the research project for the degree. 

Ph.D. Accelerated Entry Option 

The Department of Microbiology offers the Ph.D. accelerated entry option to 
graduate students who have made an early commitment to a doctoral degree and 
meet certain criteria. At the end of two semesters of studies at the master's level, 
the graduate student's advisory and research (thesis) committee will review the 
student's credentials in order to establish eligibility to enter this program. The 
student's committee then has the option to recommend continuation in the 
master's program, or to approve application to enter the doctoral program. 

The student's advisory and research (thesis) committee must establish that the 
student is prepared and able to conduct research at the doctoral level. This can be 
established by criteria such as seminars or other presentation of a research 
proposal. Further the student must have a GPA of 3.50 in all graduate course 
work, exclusive of research, special topics, etc., and letters of reference attesting to 
the student's outstanding ability and potential to perform doctoral research. 

Upon approval of the student's eligibility by the department, the chair will 
prepare a written review of the student's qualifications for entry into this option. 
This must be submitted to the Graduate School for waiver of a master's degree or 
master's equivalency before entry into the doctoral program. 

A student admitted to the doctoral program under this option is subject to all 



154 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

retention and exit requirements for the Ph.D. program including residency, 
examinations, GPA, dissertations, and all applicable time limits. 

Master's Degree 

Each candidate for the master's degree is required to complete 30 semester hours 
of acceptable graduate credit, in addition to MICRO 501 including a minimum of 
8 hours of thesis and research credit. The student is required to pass a 
comprehensive examination in microbiology and the thesis topic, and must 
present an approved thesis based on a laboratory research problem. Most 
students require two years to complete the work for a master's degree. 

At least 15 of the 30 semester hours must be in microbiology courses numbered 
500 or above. Within the 15 semester hours of 500 level credit, each student must 
successfully complete 8 semester hours of credit selected from departmental 
courses numbered 504, 520, 530, 542, 543, 551, 552, 553, and 562, taken once. The 
remaining credit hour requirements may be elected from the 400- and 500-level 
courses in the department or other departments with the approval of the graduate 
adviser. All students are required to enroll in MICRO 500 (seminar) for credit in 
each semester they are registered up to a maximum of four semesters. 

Copies of the draft thesis must be submitted to the advisory committee and the 
department chair at least 6 weeks before commencement. The approved thesis, in 
final form, must be submitted to the dean of the Graduate School at least 3 weeks 
before commencement. 

The department does grant the master's equivalency on the basis of a compre- 
hensive final examination administered by the advisory committee and a research 
paper. The granting of the master's equivalency does not confer admission to the 
Ph.D. program. Students wishing to take the master's equivalency should consult 
with their research adviser, the graduate adviser, and the department chair. 

Doctoral Degree 

Each prospective candidate for the doctorate is required to complete a minimum of 
24 semester hours of dissertation credit, satisfy the course requirements, pass the 
qualifying examination, write and defend an acceptable dissertation based on a 
laboratory research problem, and meet the Graduate School residency require- 
ments after admission to the doctoral program and before admission to candidacy. 

All students will be expected to take a one year sequence in biochemistry 
(C HEM 451a and b, or its equivalent). In addition, all students will be expected to 
demonstrate a mastery of the fundamentals of the several fields included in the 
discipline of microbiology. This requirement will be achieved by completing 3 of 
the following: 520, 542, 543, 551, 553, and 562 or 2 of these and a non-prerequisite 
400-level lecture course. Course equivalency will be decided by the department 
graduate adviser, the faculty member in charge of the relevant course, and the 
department chair. The GPA attained in these courses must be at least 3.25. 

During their first two years in the graduate program all students must enroll in 
MICRO 500 (seminar) for credit every semester. Advanced students are expected 
to attend all seminars but need not enroll. 

The student is eligible to take the preliminary examination after completing the 
course requirements. After passing the preliminary exam and meeting the 
Graduate School residency requirements, the student is advanced to candidacy 
for the doctorate. The preliminary exam shall be administered as follows. 

An approved student advisory committee (5 members of the graduate faculty) 
will prepare and administer a written preliminary exam covering several phases 
of microbiology, with particular emphasis in the area of concentration declared. 
This declaration will be done by means of a prospectus of a dissertation contain- 
ing a proposal for the dissertation research, biographical information on the can- 
didate, and a list of courses taken during the candidate's graduate program. The 
prospectus shall be in the hands of the committee members at least 14 days prior 



Academic Programs Microbiology / 155 

to the date of the examination. Upon satisfactory completion of the written exam 
the candidate will meet with the committee as a whole and discuss the prospectus 
in detail. At this time the committee may ask in depth questions about the 
research project or other phases of microbiology particularly relevant to the 
candidate's research. A written exam score of at least 80% is required before a 
student can proceed to the oral portion of the preliminary exam, and at least 4 of 
the 5 committee members must judge the oral performance acceptable for a 
student to pass the preliminary exam overall. In the event that either the written 
or oral preliminary exam is failed, a student may request only one re-examination. 

The Ph.D. preliminary exam (both written and oral portions) must be com- 
pleted within 30 months of the date of entrance into the Ph.D. degree program. 

Students working towards the doctoral degree should consider the following 
steps applicable to the dissertation. 

1 . The student and the major professor of the advisory committee determine the 
general nature of the research problem. 

2. After formulation, the problem should be discussed with the advisory 
committee before extensive work is done. A discussion of the problem may be 
presented in a departmental seminar. 

3. Periodic meetings of the student with the advisory committee are encouraged. 

4. Copies of the draft dissertation should be available to the advisory committee 
at least 2 months prior to the deadline established by the Graduate School. 
The dissertation must be defended by the student in a public oral examina- 
tion. The approved completed dissertation is transmitted to the dean of the 
Graduate School. 



Mining (Coal Extraction and Utilization) 
Engineering 

Department of Mining Engineering 

The mining engineering department at SIUC is a young and growing department 
in the College of Engineering and Technology. The department presently offers a 
four-year Bachelor of Science degree major in mining engineering and a graduate 
program leading to a Master of Science degree (coal extraction and utilization) 
major in mining engineering. It also participates in a college- wide program in the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree in engineering science. The current enrollments in 
the undergraduate and graduate programs are 30 and 22, with increases in 
undergraduate enrollment expected to level off at about 120-150 students. 

Current research in the department emphasizes 4 areas: rock mechanics and 
strata control, mine planning and design in surface and underground coal mines, 
mine reclamation, and coal preparation. Ongoing and completed projects in these 
areas include mine subsidence in room-and-pillar mining, pre-mining investiga- 
tions to delineate ground instability problems in advance of mining, effects of 
moisture absorption and swelling on strata stability in coal mines, the effect of 
moisture on anchorage capacity of roof bolts, development of pin-set bolting 
concept, remote control of backfilling in abandoned room-and-pillar mines, 
industrial engineering studies of mined land reclamation, integrated mining and 
reclamation concepts, production potential of novel underground mining sys- 
tems, model studies of air flow in multiple entrees, removal of pyritic sulfur from 
coal using flotation, and recovery of coal from refuse and slurry ponds. 

The department is equipped with modern laboratories in the areas of rock 
mechanics, coal preparation, and mine ventilation and provides excellent 
opportunities for research. The University Coal Extraction and Utilization 
Research Center is located on campus and assists researchers in developing 
research funding sources. Excellent opportunities exist for graduate students to 
work at the center during summers. 



156 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

A graduate program leading to a Master of Science degree major in mining 
(coal extraction and utilization) engineering is available in the Department of 
Mining Engineering for students who are interested in coal extraction and 
utilization. The program is administered academically by a program committee. 
Course offerings and research activities include the following. 

Coal Extraction — mine ventilation and environment control, mine extraction 
systems, strata control and rock mechanics, mine management, design of mine 
machinery. 

Coal Utilization— coal preparation processes, coal conversion and combustion 
processes. 

Environmental Effects — mine-waste management, emission control engineer- 
ing, waste-heat management, mining and the environment. 

Basic Science Related to Coal Mining— coal geology, hydrology, coal chemistry. 

Admission 

Students seeking admission to the graduate program in mining engineering must 
meet the admission standards set by the Graduate School. In addition, a 
bachelor's degree major in engineering or its equivalent is required for admission 
into the program. A student whose undergraduate training is deficient may be 
required by the program committee to make up course work without graduate 
credit. 

Requirements 

A graduate student in mining engineering is required to develop a program of 
study with a graduate adviser and establish a graduate committee of at least 3 
members at the earliest possible date. The graduate committee must be approved 
by the mining engineering program committee. For a student who wishes to 
complete the requirements of the master's degree with a thesis, a minimum of 30 
semester hours of acceptable graduate credit is required. Of this total, 18 semester 
hours must be earned in the mining engineering major. Each candidate is also 
required to pass a comprehensive examination covering all of the student's 
graduate work including thesis. 

If a student prefers the non-thesis option, a minimum of 36 semester hours of 
acceptable graduate credit is required. The student is expected to take at least 21 
semester hours in the mining engineering major including no more than 3 
semester hours of the appropriate Mining Engineering 592 course to be devoted to 
the preparation of a research paper. In addition, each candidate is required to 
pass a written comprehensive examination. The graduate committee of a student 
who is in the non-thesis option will: 

1. Approve the student's program of study, 

2. Approve the student's research paper topic, 

3. Approve the completed research paper, 

4. Administer and approve the written comprehensive examination. 
Assistantships and fellowships are available for qualified applicants. Addi- 
tional information about programs, courses, assistantships, and fellowships may 
be obtained from the Department of Mining Engineering. 

Molecular Science 

Molecular science is an interdisciplinary Ph.D. program designed to provide 
advanced education for those students who desire to pursue scientific careers 
which require understanding at the molecular level. The program draws its 
faculty from departments in the College of Science, the College of Engineering 
and Technology, the College of Liberal Arts, and the School of Medicine. This 
faculty offers a variety of interdisciplinary areas of research. Examples of such 



Academic Programs Molecular Science / 157 

areas are molecular biology, biophysics, geophysics, geochemistry, coal science, 
chemical physics, catalysis, engineering science, and applied mathematics. 

Students may enter the program with a master's degree from diverse educa- 
tional backgrounds including the physical sciences, engineering, the life sciences, 
and mathematics. During the initial phase of study it is expected that most 
students will take some undergraduate courses in the areas of mathematics, 
physics, chemistry, and biology to expand their basic knowledge to the required 
breadth. Then in their second phase of study, each student will take 3 preliminary 
examinations in the graduate breadth areas of their choice. Additionally, a 
written examination will be required for each student in their own specialty area, 
and this will be followed by an oral examination which will include the 3 breadth 
areas as well as the area of emphasis. Passing these preliminary examinations 
and a research tool requirement qualify a student for admission for candidacy. 

In their third and final phase, candidates for the Ph.D. degree must complete 
their research, write their dissertation, and pass an open oral examination on 
their dissertation work. 

Because students enter the program from different backgrounds, it is difficult 
to predict the time required for each student to complete each phase. In practice 
the phases overlap. Phases one and two occur in the first year with phase two 
continuing through the second year. Research usually starts during the second 
year. A well prepared student might complete the program in 3 years; however, 4 
years is a reasonable average time to expect most students to complete the 
program. 

Admission to Graduate Study 

Admission to the Ph.D. program with a major in molecular science requires a 
master's degree or its equivalent in the physical sciences, life sciences, mathemat- 
ics, or engineering. In addition, the student must have a grade point average of at 
least 3.25 in graduate courses. 

Students holding the baccalaureate degree in the above listed fields are 
admissible to graduate study in preparation for subsequent admission to the 
molecular science program. They may join the program after either obtaining a 
master's degree or its equivalent. Application for master's equivalency requires 
(a) completion of 30 semester hours of acceptable graduate credit, at least 15 hours 
of which must be courses numbered 500 or above, and (b) completion of an 
approved research paper which demonstrates evidence of the student's knowl- 
edge of research techniques, and which is based on a special research project. 
In addition to the other subject matter they may have studied, students must have 
the background listing below (SIUC equivalency courses are listed in 
parentheses): 

Mathematics— through differential equations (MATH 150, 250, and 305). 
Chemistry — freshman chemistry, one semester of organic chemistry, and one 
semester of either physical chemistry or the third semester of university physics 
(CHEM 222 AB-8, or 224-5 and 225-2 plus 340-4 and either 460-3, or PHYS 205C-3). 
Physics — two semesters of sophomore level physics and either the third semester 
of university physics or physical chemistry (PHYS 203AB-6, or 205AB-6 plus 
205C-3, or CHEM 460-3). 

Biology — a minimum of two semesters beyond General Studies biology (either 
two courses chosen from BOT 335, CHEM 352, MICRO 301 , MICRO 302, PSYCH 
312, and ZOOL 309 or three courses from BIOL 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, and PHSL 
210). 

Since the program in molecular science is interdisciplinary and broadly based, 
it is anticipated that many students entering the program will not have the 
breadth indicated above. This breadth may be attained by taking the regularly 
offered courses listed in parentheses. The program chair will determine course 
equivalencies between SIUC and other schools. 



158 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

Retention in the Program 

After completion of phase one, the performance of each student will be evaluated 
by the executive committee. The executive committee will make a decision on the 
continuation in the program for each student. Affirmative action by the 
committee certifies the student to be qualified to undertake further study in 
molecular science. 

Admission to Candidacy for Ph.D. 

After satisfying the breadth requirements and completing the research tool 
requirement, the student may seek admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree 
major in molecular science. This may be accomplished by passing 3 preliminary 
breadth examinations from the following list and by passing a fourth preliminary 
examination in the student's area of emphasis. The nature of these examinations 
is described in the following paragraphs. 

The student will choose 3 breadth areas from the following list of 8 broad 
preliminary examination areas. Each of these breadth areas is described by 
graduate courses. The student may pass each breadth area in 2 ways: (1) by 
passing 2 or more of the designated courses with a grade average of at least 3.5, or 
(2) by passing a comprehensive written examination in the breadth area. 

Breadth Areas. 

Quantum Theory and Molecular Spectroscopy. 

Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics. 

Engineering Sciences I: Electrical Sciences and Systems or Fluid and Solid 

Sciences. 

Engineering Sciences II: Transfer Processes or Material Sciences. 

Applied Mathematics. 

Biochemistry or Organic Chemistry. 

Biophysics. 

Molecular Biology. 

The chair of the molecular science program will appoint faculty members to de- 
sign, administer, and evaluate the preliminary examinations in the breadth areas. 

The student and the student's dissertation adviser will designate an area of 
emphasis. The preliminary examination in this specialty area will be written and 
will be followed by an oral examination which will also include the 3 breadth 
areas. The written examination will be composed under the direction of the 
student's dissertation adviser. The oral examination will be conducted by the 
student's committee. The purpose of this last oral examination is to establish that 
the student is, in fact, a Ph.D. candidate. 

Failure by the student to pass any preliminary examination will lead to a review 
of the student's status by the executive committee and the student's committee. 
They may decide (1) to allow the student to retake only the failed examinations, 
(2) to require the student to retake both the failed examinations as well as the ex- 
aminations in which the student demonstrates weakness to the extent that the 
performance was considered border line pass, or (3) to terminate the student. In 
any case, no student will be allowed more than 2 tries at passing any one 
preliminary examination in any area. Additionally, permission to choose a 
different area after failure in one must be approved by both the executive 
committee and the student's committee. Such permission may be approved only 
once. 

The research tool requirement is satisfied either by passing the ETS examina- 
tion in French, German, or Russian or by demonstrating competence in computer 
programming. 

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree with a Major in Molecular Science. A candi- 



Academic Programs Molecular Science / 159 

date for the Ph.D. degree must meet the general requirements as set forth by the 
Graduate School. 

Advisement Procedures 

The program chair will serve as graduate adviser for the program. Each student is 
expected to consult the chair in planning the initial part of the graduate program 
in developing a course of study in preparation for the preliminary examination. 
The student must also request approval for a dissertation adviser no later than 3 
semesters after being admitted to the program. The dissertation adviser will 
recommend a Ph.D. committee which the program chair will submit for approval 
by the dean of the Graduate School. The student's committee will work out with 
the student and monitor a scheduled program for completion of the Ph.D. degree. 



Music 

The School of Music faculty numbers twenty-seven full-time positions. Within its 
ranks are to be found many outstanding performers and educators, representing 
a broad diversification of background and talent. Faculty members present many 
solo and small ensemble performances, as well as clinics and workshops, during 
the school year. Sixteen members of the faculty hold doctorates or its equivalent. 

Library Facilities 

In addition to Morris Library, the School of Music has its own recording and score 
library, including modern stereo listening facilities, cassettes, and cassette decks 
for self-instruction in ear training and music literature, some 1600 LP recordings 
and tapes, over 1100 scores, many in multiple copies, and 94 books and reference 
works. The self-instruction center in Morris Library provides tape recordings of 
theory and literature for student use. 

Musical Organizations 

A wide variety of performing opportunities is available, including the University 
Symphony, symphonic band, wind ensemble, jazz ensemble, Marching Salukis, 
brass ensemble, guitar ensemble, percussion ensemble, choral union, concert 
choir, chamber choir, and vocal jazz ensemble. The Marjorie Lawrence Opera 
Workshop presents one full opera production each year in addition to several 
programs of small operas and operatic excerpts. The Summer Music Theater 
presents two full-scale musicals during the summer session. 

Musical Performances 

Some 130 School of Music programs are presented each year, plus Southern 
Illinois Concert Series and Celebrity Series appearances by well-known concert 
artists. A program booklet for further details concerning concert activity is 
available through the School of Music. 

Other Resources 

A fifty-eight rank Reuter pipe organ, the principal instrument for recitals and 
teaching, is installed in Shryock Auditorium. Available for practicing are a 
four-rank Ott tracker organ, a six-rank Moeller, and a four-rank Wicks. Eighty- 
five pianos, including twenty-two in practice rooms, an eighteen-unit electronic 
piano lab, and a full complement of band and orchestral instruments are 
available. 

Graduate Assistantship and Fellowship Applications 

Any student seeking a master's degree may apply to the coordinator of graduate 
studies in music for a graduate assistantship. An undergraduate overall grade- 



160 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

point average of 2.8 (A- 4 points) is required for consideration. The assignment of 
assistantships, for those who are eligible, is based upon School of Music needs 
and student qualifications. A student with an overall grade-point average of 3.5 or 
better is eligible to apply for a graduate fellowship involving no School of Music 
assignment. The School of Music offers six programs leading to the Master of 
Music degree. Each master's degree requires a minimum total of 30 credits, with a 
minimum total of 15 credits at the 500 level. Students enrolled in a program 
leading to a Ph.D. degree major in education, with a concentration in curriculum 
and instruction education, may choose the elective portion of their programs from 
graduate courses offered in the School of Music. 

Master of Music Degree Standard Curricula 

MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE CONCENTRATION 

Majors complete MUS 501-3; 502-4 (2,2); 2 credits (1,1) from 566; 6 credits selected 
from 475, 476, 477, 573, 574, or 578; 599-6; 6 credits in music history-literature 
electives; 3 elective credits in non-music history-literature courses. In addition to 
the general requirements for graduation, music history/literature majors must 
have successfully completed two years of a foreign language (preferably French 
or German), at the undergraduate level, or pass 388-488 (German or French) as a 
research tool with a grade of B or higher. 

MUSIC THEORY AND COMPOSITION CONCENTRATION 

Majors complete MUS 501-3; 502-4 (2,2); 545-3; 3 credits from the 470 or 570 series; 
480-4 (580-4 must be completed by composition majors); 2 credits (1,1) selected 
from 566; 599-6; 5 credits of approved music electives in theory-composition, 
history-literature, conducting, or performance. 

PERFORMANCE CONCENTRATION 

Majors complete MUS 501-3; 502a or b (2); 5 credits from 461, 482, or 470 or 570 
series; 8 credits in 540 (440 if specializing in pedagogy); 2 credits from 566, 567, or 
568 (or other electives if keyboard major); 6 credits in 595 and 598 (recital and 
document); 4 credits in non-performing music elective. If specializing in conduct- 
ing, majors must complete MUS 501-3; 502-4 (2,2); 556-4 (2,2); 3-6 credits from the 
470 or 570 series; 2-4 credits in 440; 2 credits from 566 (1,1) or other electives if 
keyboard major; 6 credits in 595 and 598 (recital and document); 3 credits in music 
electives. 

OPERA/MUSIC THEATER CONCENTRATION 

Opera and music theater majors must have an undergraduate degree major in 
music with appropriate experience in opera or music theater, or in theater with 
additional music study sufficient to qualify in performance, theory, and history of 
music. Core courses (required) include MUS 468 (2-4); 501 (3); 570 (3); 595 (2); 598 (4) 
or 599 (6) in lieu of 598 and 595. Also required are MUS 567 or 568 (1,1,1,1); and 6 
credits from 440-540; 461; 472; 479c or 556. In addition, 6 hours of theater credits 
must be earned from THEA 402a,b,; 403a,b, 404, 409, 412a,b, 413a,b, 415a,b, 
417a,b, 432, 505, 513 (2,2), 517a,b, 530, or 522. 

PIANO EDUCATION ARTS CONCENTRATION 

Majors complete hours of credit in the following music courses: 3 credits in 501; 2 
credits in 502a or b; 4 in 440 or 540; 4 credits in 498 and 2 credits in 595 or 4 (2,2) 
in 498 and 2 in 595 or 2 in 498 and 4 in 599; 2 in 483 (readings in piano pedagogy); 2 
in 499 (graduate teaching practicum); 2 credits (1,1) from 566; 3 from approved 
music electives; and 6 hours from approved non-music courses (in fields of guid- 
ance and educational psychology, higher education, philosophy, and speech 
communication). 



Academic Programs Music / 161 



MUSIC EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 

Majors complete MUS 501-3; 502a or b (2); 4-5 credits from 509, 578 or 503; 7-8 
credits selected from music education courses; 2 credits (1,1) from 566; 5 credits 
elected from non-music education courses including at least one course from 410, 
482, or the 470 or 570 series; 599-6 or 6 credits from 499 and 595; or 595 and 598. 

General Information 

Fees. Fees are not charged for individual instruction, practice rooms, or instru- 
ment lockers. Instruments are loaned without charge when needed. Student 
expenses for music, textbooks, and other incidental supplies are usually nominal. 

Advisement. The graduate coordinator in music supervises the overall planning 
of the student's program and designates the document or thesis director. 

Diagnostic tests in music theory and history are given during orientation at the 
beginning of the fall semester and must be taken by all students at the first 
opportunity after admission. The student with weaknesses in certain areas may 
be asked to take additional work in those areas. A student will be accepted as a 
performance major in the Master of Music degree program after satisfactory 
audition in person, either before admission or during orientation. A performance 
major may be conditionally accepted on the basis of a tape recording; but a 
student accepted conditionally may be asked to audition in person during 
orientation or during the first term of residence, and may be required to register at 
the 400 level in performance until approved by personal audition. Current 
brochures from various performance areas and the Graduate Handbook in Music 
describe the level of repertory expected, audition procedures, and diagnostic tests. 

Ensemble Requirement. All graduate students are required to register for MUS 
566 (MUS 567 or 568 may substitute for MUS 566 only for those students whose 
concentration is opera music theater) each semester of degree study (summers 
excepted). Participation is required each semester in one or more of the following: 
Marching Salukis, symphonic band, wind ensemble, symphony, choral union, 
concert choir, chamber singers, or guitar ensemble. In addition, students may 
elect participation in other regularly scheduled emphasis. Graduate assistants 
assigned ensemble accompanying must register for alternate ensemble for credit. 
Petitions for exceptions to the ensemble requirement must be made in writing and 
presented to the School of Music graduate committee for consideration. 

Exceptions to Degree Requirements. Appropriate substitutions in the curriculum 
for the Master of Music degree may be made if recommended by the student's 
adviser and approved by the graduate committee in music. Students who expect 
to earn more than half of their credits during summer terms only, or by a 
combination of summer attendance and night classes, may similarly propose a 
sequence of course offerings, following the above curricular patterns as far as 
possible. All curricula must meet Graduate School requirements and be approved 
by the graduate committee in music. Special summer students changing plans 
and registering for more than one regular fall or spring semester will ordinarily 
follow the appropriate standard curriculum. 

The Thesis, Document, and Research Paper. All master's degree candidates will 
complete either (1) a thesis, or (2) a large, original composition and document, or 
(3) a full recital performance and document. 

No later that the beginning of the semester preceding the semester in which the 
student expects to graduate, the graduate coordinator, in consultation with the 
student, will designate a document or thesis director from the current list of 



162 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

graduate faculty from whom a student has taken graduate level courses. The 
document or thesis director guides the student's choice of topic and is responsible 
for the progress and quality of the resulting work. The document director 
normally heads the student's orals committee. Before any work is begun on the 
thesis or document, the student submits a proposal, together with a selective 
bibliography where applicable and the reactions of the document or thesis 
director, to the coordinator of graduate studies in music for approval by the 
graduate committee. Changes of topic or of document director after initial ap- 
proval must be approved by the music graduate committee. 

Graduate Recital (598-4) is supervised by a jury of at least 3 members, headed by 
the student's instructor in performance. This jury approves the level of literature 
to be performed and acceptability of the performance by means of an audition in 
advance of the final performance. 

Comprehensive Examinations. During the final semester of study, and after 
completion of the document or thesis, the student will take comprehensive 
examinations dealing with general areas of music and concentrations of music 
study, and, when appropriate, with the student's thesis or document. Application 
to take comprehensive examinations must be made at the beginning of the 
students last semester of study. The examinations must be passed in time to meet 
Graduate School deadlines. Application for comprehensive examinations may 
not be made until all other requirements, with the exception of terminal-semester 
courses, for the degree have been satisfied. A failed section of the comprehensive 
examinations may be taken again in a following term. 

The oral examination committee, appointed by the coordinator of graduate 
studies in music, is headed by the student's document or thesis director with two 
or more faculty members with whom the student has had graduate level classes, 
as requested by the student. If the student has scheduled 6 or more hours in a 
department other than music, a member of this department will be invited to 
serve on the examining committee. The examination committee will conduct the 
student's oral examination and will supply questions for the student's written 
examination. 

Three copies of all theses, thesis-composition manuscripts, and tapes and 
documents must be submitted in final form to the music graduate office at least 5 
weeks before the intended date of graduation, carrying the approval of all 
members of the student's graduation committee. The graduate coordinator will 
forward 1 copy of a student's document (2, if a thesis) to the Graduate School and 
retain 1 copy. 



Pharmacology 



Graduate courses of study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philoso- 
phy degrees in pharmacology are offered by SIU School of Medicine, Department 
of Pharmacology. Course offerings in the graduate program have been designed 
so that graduate students may acquire a broad basic knowledge as well as 
research experience in different areas of pharmacology. Graduate students may 
choose from a diversity of specializations when selecting a research adviser and a 
research topic. Excellent, well-equipped research facilities are available on the 
Springfield and Carbondale campuses. Graduate courses in pharmacology may 
be taken as part of a program leading to degrees in physiology, biological 
sciences, or toward a teaching specialty in secondary or higher education. 
Courses in pharmacology are also available to senior medical students, residents, 
and other non-majors with selected subspecialties such as psychiatry, medicine, 
(neurology and cardiology) and certain surgical subspecialties. 



Academic Programs Pharmacology / 163 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES IN PHARMA- 
COLOGY 
Admission 

The applicant must first be admitted to the Graduate School. The application and 
transcript, if approved, are then transmitted by the Graduate School to the 
Department of Pharmacology. 

To receive an advanced degree in pharmacology, students must fulfill the 
requirements of both the Graduate School and the pharmacology graduate 
program. Students entering the pharmacology graduate program are required to 
have a strong background in physiology and biochemistry. Deficiencies, if they 
exist, should be fulfilled in Carbondale before coming to Springfield to complete 
the program. 

Each student should possess an undergraduate degree in one of the biological 
sciences. Students with undergraduate training in related areas, such as 
chemistry, physics, mathematics, computer science, psychology, or engineering 
are strongly encouraged to consider graduate work in pharmacology. All 
students must present certification of credit or its equivalent (earned either as an 
undergraduate or a graduate student) for the following in order to be eligible for 
admission to an advanced degree program. 

1. Inorganic chemistry (2 semesters) 

2. Organic chemistry (2 semesters) 

3. Physics (2 semesters) 

4. Mathematics (2 semesters) 

Students may be admitted with deficiencies in the above areas, but must 
remedy these prior to obtaining an advanced degree. 

Admission into the pharmacology graduate program requires an undergraduate 
grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 04 = 4.0) for admission into the master's 
program. A GPA of 3.25 (A - 4.0) on undergraduate work is required for the direct 
entry (post-baccalaureate degree) option into a doctoral program. A GPA of 3.25 
(A = 4.0) in graduate level work is required for admission into a doctoral program 
from a post-master's or by the accelerated entry (from a master's program) option. 

In addition to the above general requirements, each applicant must submit: 

1. Directly to the Graduate School: a completed application and original tran- 
scripts transmitted from each university or college attended by the applicant. 

2. To the Department of Pharmacology: a brief (300 to 600 words) typed 
statement of goals and ambitions indicating why the applicant wishes to do 
graduate work in pharmacology. 

3. Scores of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) including scores on (a) the 
general and (b) one advanced section (biology or chemistry) taken within the 
past 12 months. 

4. Three letters of recommendation from faculty who know the applicant's 
potential, written on forms supplied by the Department of Pharmacology. 

5. International students must submit or request a copy of the TOEFL scores to 
be sent directly to the Graduate School. The Graduate School requires a score 
of 550 or better on the TOEFL. 

Equivalent work completed at other institutions or in other collegiate units may 
be substituted for certain course requirements for graduate work in pharmacology 
if approval is obtained from the graduate school and the pharmacology graduate 
program committee. 

Retention 

All retention rules imposed by the Graduate School will be adhered to closely. 

Master's Degree. An overall GPA of 3.0 (A = 4.0) in all graduate work in the 



164 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

program is required for retention. Any grade below B in a pharmacology core 
course must be compensated for by retaking the course and earning an A or B grade. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree. An overall GPA of 3.0 (A = 4.0) in all graduate work 
in the program is required for retention. Any student who makes a grade below a 
B in a pharmacology core course will not be retained in the Ph.D. degree program 
of the Department of Pharmacology. 

Financial Assistance 

The pharmacology graduate program offers financial assistance to qualified 
applicants accepted into the program. Teaching assistantships, research as- 
sistantships, and departmental fellowships are available, for which application 
is made directly to the Department of Pharmacology. Information and applica- 
tion forms for scholarships and loans may be obtained through the program 
director. Time limits for receiving support are governed by the Graduate School. 
Graduate students should be aware that renewal of support whether it be in the 
form of a teaching assistantship, research assistantship, or fellowship is 
contingent upon satisfactory evaluation of the student's performance and upon 
time limitations for support. Failure to meet the requirements in any or all of these 
areas may lead to termination of support. The evaluation considers both the 
performance of assigned duties pertaining to the graduate assistantship and on 
progress in course work and research. 

CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO THE MASTER'S AND 
PH.D. DEGREES IN PHARMACOLOGY 

All graduate students are required to complete formal course work in 2 areas: (1) 
the program core courses and (2) electives. The program core courses include 
PHRM 500, Pharmacology Seminar, in which all graduate students are required 
to present and participate every fall and spring semester; PHRM 500a and b, 
Principles of Pharmacology; PHRM 551, Methods in Pharmacology; and 1 ad- 
vanced course of 3 credit hours for a master's degree, or 2 advanced courses of 3 
credit hours each for a doctoral degree. Maximum course work for full-time gradu- 
ate students is 16 hours per semester; 12 hours is considered average. For a student 
with a half-time assistantship, 12 hours is the maximum, 6 hours is the minimum. 

All graduate students must acquire appropriate research tools as required by 
the Graduate School and the graduate student's advisory and research committee. 
Master's students are encouraged, but not required, to attain competence in at least 
1 research tool. Doctoral students are required to attain competence in at least 2 
research tools. Requirements for a research tool may be satisfied by establishing 
proficiency in statistics, computer sciences, electronics, advanced mathematics, 
electron microscopy, foreign language (Russian, German, or French), or a 
technique which is acceptable to the student's advisory and research committee. 
This may be accomplished by formal training or it may be demonstrated in a 
manner acceptable to the graduate student's advisory and research committee. 

An advisory system in pharmacology will help students in planning their 
program. Upon admission to the master's or doctoral program, students will be 
advised by the pharmacology graduate program director until a research adviser 
is chosen by the student. The programs outlined by students, their advisers, and 
advisory committees are subject to approval of the pharmacology graduate pro- 
gram committee. Students should select their research adviser no later than the 
end of their second (master's) and third (doctoral) semester in residence. The 
choice of adviser, and subsequently the advisory and research committee, is an 
important step and should be carefully considered. 

As soon as a graduate student has selected a research adviser, a graduate 
research and advisory committee should be selected. The committee for a student 



Academic Programs Pharmacology / 165 

in the master's program will consist of a minimum of 4 members: the student's 
research adviser (chair), 2 faculty members from pharmacology and 1 faculty 
member from outside pharmacology. The committee for a student in the doctoral 
program will consist of a minimum of 5 members: the student's research adviser 
(chair), 3 faculty members from pharmacology, and 1 faculty member from 
outside pharmacology. Members of this committee should be able to contribute 
significantly to the area of the student's research program. The student's 
research adviser via the graduate program director and the chair of the 
Department of Pharmacology will request approval of this committee by the dean 
of the Graduate School. The chair of the Department of Pharmacology and the 
graduate program director are ex-officio members for all advisory committees 
upon which they are not already members. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES IN PHARMACOLOGY 
Master of Science Degree in Pharmacology 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

1. A minimum of 2 years of full-time study (1 year in residence) is required for a 
master's degree. At least 15 of these must be in 500 level courses, 6 of which 
may be PHRM 599. A thesis must be completed in the student's research area 
of interest with the approval of the thesis committee. 

2. A total of 30 semester hours at the 400 and 500 level is required for a master's 
degree. At least 15 of these must be in 500 level courses, 6 of which may be 
PHRM 599. A thesis must be completed in the student's research area of 
interest with the approval of the thesis committee. 

3. A master's student must satisfactorily complete at least 2 1 hours of graduate 
course work graded A, B, C. These hours must be in courses at the 400/500 
level. 

4. A written comprehensive examination must be passed with a grade of B or 
better. It will be prepared, conducted, and evaluated by the pharmacology 
graduate program committee and will be given each fall and spring semester. 
This examination will become a part of the student's permanent file. 

5. Before significant research has begun, a thesis proposal is required. The 
thesis proposal will be presented in a pharmacology seminar. Immediately 
following the seminar, the proposal will be defended orally before the 
student's advisory and research committee. The cover sheet for graduate stu- 
dent thesis proposal must be signed by all members of the student's advisory 
and research committee and filed with the graduate program director. 

6. The thesis is expected to be a competent, original research project carried out 
in a selected area under the research adviser's supervision. It should include a 
statement of the problem, an adequate review of literature, a careful analysis 
of results by whatever methods are appropriate, and an interpretation of the 
work by a significant source. The student must submit a preliminary draft of 
the thesis to the adviser at least 10 weeks prior to graduation. A corrected 
copy must be submitted to other members of the advisory and research 
committee not later than 8 weeks before graduation. 

7. Results of the thesis research must be defended in a pharmacology seminar 
which must be announced at least one week in advance by sending out proper 
notices. Immediately following the seminar, an oral examination will be 
conducted by the student's advisory and research committee; and it will cover 
the thesis. Any member of the University community may attend this exam- 
ination and may participate in the questioning and discussion, subject to 
reasonable time limitations imposed by the committee chair. Only committee 
members may vote or make recommendations concerning acceptance of the 
thesis and the oral examination. 

8. The student will be recommended for the degree if members of the student's 



166 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

advisory and research committee judge both the thesis and the performance 
at the oral examination to be satisfactory. Evaluation forms will be 
completed by the student's advisory and research committee. If approved, a I 
thesis approval form will be completed, signed by the student's major adviser I 
and the chair of the Department of Pharmacology, and transmitted to the 
Graduate School. The examination may be repeated once, at least 3 months 
after the first examination. A second failure will result in dismissal from the | 
pharmacology graduate program. 
9. Each student is required to have 6 credit hours of PHRM 599, Thesis Re- 
search. A student who has completed all course work and has registered for 
the minimum of thesis research hours required for the degree must register in 
PHRM 601, Continuing Enrollment, until completion of the degree. 
10. It is the student's responsibility to give 2 appropriate unbound copies of the 
thesis to the Graduate School. One bound copy should be given to the gradu- 
ate program director and 1 to the adviser at least 3 weeks prior to graduation. 

REPRESENTATIVE SCHEDULING 

Below is a representative schedule of the requirements for the master's degree in 
pharmacology. In addition to the core course requirements listed below, addi- 
tional electives offered include: PHRM 565-2, Toxicology; PHRM 560-2, Geriatrics 
Pharmacology; and PHRM-1 to 24, Readings and Research in Pharmacology. 

In Carbondale. 

Year 1 Credits 

Fall Semester 

PHSL 410a Mammalian Physiology 5 

CHEM 451a Biochemistry 3 

PHSL 500 Advanced Seminar 1 

Total 9 
Spring Semester 

PHSL 410b Mammalian Physiology 5 

CHEM 451b Biochemistry 3 

PHSL 500 Advanced Seminar 1 

Total 9 
In Springfield. 
Summer Semester 

PHRM 551 Methods in Pharmacolog 4 

Total 4 
Year 2 

Fall Semester, Choose Adviser and Formulate Thesis Committee 

PHRM 500a Principles of Pharmacology 4 

PHRM 500b Principles of Pharmacology 4 

PHRM 500 Seminar in Pharmacology 1 

Total 9 
Spring Semester, Thesis Proposal Defended Orally 

*PHRM 555 Cardiovascular Pharmacology 3 

*PHRM 574 Neuropharmacology 3 

PHRM 599 Thesis Research 3 

PHRM 500 Seminar in Pharmacology 1 
*Choice of One Advanced Course 

Summer Semester, Written Comprehensive Exam of Course Work 

PHRM 599 Thesis Research 3 

Total 3 

SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS 

Achieve grade point average of at least a 3.0 ( A = 4.0) 



Academic Programs Pharmacology / 167 

Completion of the research tools required by the thesis committee 

Oral defense of thesis proposal 

Comprehensive written exam of course work 

Submission of thesis to adviser (10 weeks prior to graduation) 

Corrected thesis to thesis committee (8 weeks prior to graduation) 

Announcement of thesis defense (1 week prior notice) 

Oral defense of thesis 

Submission of approved thesis to Graduate School (2 copies), graduate program 

director (1 copy), and adviser (1 copy) 3 weeks prior to graduation 

Submission of departmental clearance form 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Pharmacology 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

1. Students entering the doctoral program in pharmacology should present as 
minimum the requirements listed for the master's degree program. In 
addition it is strongly recommended that the doctoral student have completed 
calculus and physical chemistry. 

Students entering the doctoral program in pharmacology may choose to be 
admitted under 1 of 3 options: the post-master's option, a direct entry (post- 
baccalaureate) option, or an accelerated entry (from a master's program) 
option. 

a. The Post-Master's Entry Option is offered to the student who has 
excelled academically and plans to continue research and scholarly work in a 
chosen field. The Graduate School requires that the student meets all general 
requirements for admission and has a GPA of 3.25 (A = 4.0). 

b. The Direct-Entry (Post-Baccalaureate) Option is offered to the outstand- 
ing post-baccalaureate student who has a high potential for independent 
doctoral level research, has clearly defined professional objectives, and ful- 
fills all the general admission requirements of the doctoral program. To be ad- 
mitted through the direct-entry option, the student must have the following. 

i. a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.25 (A = 4.0) 

ii. undergraduate course work in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathe- 
matics beyond the freshman level and an outstanding score on the Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) on (a) the general part, (b) the advanced part in 
biology, and (c) the advanced part in chemistry, physics, or mathematics. 

c. The Accelerated Entry (from a master's program) Option is designed for 
a student who makes an early commitment to a doctoral degree. This option 
may be recommended by the masters student's advisory and research 
committee after a review of the student's credentials and eligibility has been 
established. If severe deficiencies in grades or evaluation are present, 
however, recommendation for termination may be made. To be eligible for 
this option, the committee must establish: 

i. the student has attained a 3.25 (A - 4.0) GPA in graduate course work 
ii the student is prepared and able to conduct research at the doctoral 
level. This may be done through publications, presentations at meetings and 
seminars, or preparation and oral presentation of the research proposal. 

iii. the student has letters of reference attesting to the student's ability 
and potential to perform doctoral research. 

Upon establishing the student's eligibility, the student's advisory and 
research committee will prepare a written review of the student's qualifica- 
tions. Approval of the review must be given by the pharmacology graduate 
program committee and the chair of the Department of Pharmacology, who 
will then make recommendation to the Graduate School for waiver of the 
master's degree or master's equivalency before entry into the doctoral 
program. 

2. The specific course work requirements for the Ph.D. degree will be established 



168 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

by the student's advisory and research committee in accordance with the 
requirements of the program. The Graduate School requires 24 semester 
hours of course work before making application to candidacy. 

3. The Ph.D. degree may not be conferred less than 6 months nor more than 5 
years after admission to candidacy, except upon approval of the dean of the 
Graduate School. The student is admitted to the Ph.D. degree candidacy after 
having completed the residency requirement, the research tool requirement, 
and the comprehensive written preliminary examination. 

4. A comprehensive written preliminary examination of course work must be 
passed with a grade of B or better. It will be prepared, conducted, and 
evaluated by the pharmacology graduate program committee and will be 
given each fall and spring semester. This examination will become a part of 
the student's permanent file. The preliminary examination may be repeated 
only once at least 3 months after the examination. Most course work should 
be completed prior to this examination, but it should precede the greater part 
of the dissertation research. 

5. Before significant research has begun, a dissertation proposal is required. 
The dissertation proposal will be presented in a pharmacology seminar. 
Immediately following this seminar, the proposal will be defended orally 
before the student's advisory and research committee. The cover sheet for 
graduate student dissertation proposal must be signed by all members of the 
student's advisory and research committee and filed with the graduate pro- 
gram director. 

6. The dissertation is expected to be a competent, original research project 
which will make a significant contribution to the body of scientific knowledge. 
As such, it should be of sufficient quality to merit publication in a peer- 
reviewed journal. It should include a statement of the problem, an adequate 
review of literature, a careful analysis of results by whatever methods are 
appropriate, and an interpretation of the work by a significant source. 

7. Admission to candidacy is granted by the dean of the Graduate School upon 
recommendation of the student's advisory and research committee after the 
student has fulfilled the residency requirement for the doctoral degree, passed 
the comprehensive written preliminary examination and met the research 
tool requirement. The candidate must fulfill all degree requirements within a 
five-year period after admission to candidacy, or may be required to take an- 
other preliminary examination and be admitted to candidacy a second time. 

8. After admission to candidacy, the student must complete 24 hours of 
dissertation credit, (PHRM 600), complete the research and the dissertation 
document. A student who has completed all formal course work, dissertation 
and candidacy credit requirements but has not completed and defended the 
dissertation must register for PHRM 601, Continuing Enrollment, until 
completion of the degree. 

9. A preliminary draft of the dissertation should be given to the adviser at least 
10 weeks prior to graduation, a corrected copy should be submitted to other 
committee members no later than 8 weeks before graduation. 

10. Results of the dissertation research must be defended in a pharmacology sem- 
inar which must be announced at least one week in advance by sending out 
proper notice. Immediately following the pharmacology seminar, a final oral 
examination will be conducted covering the dissertation subject and other 
discipline related matters. Any member of the University community may 
attend the final oral examination and may participate in the questioning and 
discussion, subject to reasonable time limitations imposed by the committee 
chair. Only members of the committee may vote or make recommendations 
concerning acceptance of the dissertation and final examination. 

A student will be recommended for the degree if members of the advisory 
and research committee judge both the dissertation and the performance at 



Academic Programs Pharmacology / 169 

the final examination to be satisfactory. Evaluation forms will be completed 
by the committee. If approved, a dissertation approval form will be completed, 
signed by the student's major adviser and the chair of the Department of 
Pharmacology, and submitted to the Graduate School. The examination 
may be repeated once, at least 3 months after the first examination. Failure of 
the second examination will result in dismissal from the pharmacology 
graduate program. 
11. It is the student's responsibility to give 2 unbound copies of the dissertation to 
the Graduate School, along with an abstract of 600 words or less. One bound 
copy should be given to the graduate program director and to the student's 
adviser at least 3 weeks prior to graduation. All dissertations will be 
microfilmed and there is a fee. 

REPRESENTATIVE SCHEDULING 

Below is a representative schedule of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree in 
pharmacology. Note that alternative scheduling is available for those students 
who desire an accelerated entry from a master's degree program, or for those stu- 
dents who already have a Master of Science degree in pharmacology. In addition 
to the required course work listed below, other electives offered by the pharmacol- 
ogy graduate program include PHRM 565-2, Toxicology; PHRM 560-2, Geriatric 
Pharmacology; PHRM 590-1 to 24, Readings and Research in Pharmacology. 

In Carbondale. 

Year 1 Credits 

Fall Semester 

PHSL 410a Mammalian Physiology 5 

CHEM 451a Biochemistry 3 

EPSY 506 Statistics, Inferential 4 

Total 12 
In Springfield. 
Summer Session 

PHRM 551 Methods in Pharmacology 4 

Total 4 
Year 2 

Fall Semester, Choose Adviser and Formulate Dissertation Committee 

PHRM 550a Principles of Pharmacology 4 

PHRM 550b Principles of Pharmacology 4 

PHRM 500 Pharmacology Seminar 1 

PHRM 600 Dissertation Research (optional) 3 

Total 9-12 
Spring Semester 

*PHRM 555 Cardiovascular Pharmacology 3 

*PHRM 574 Neuropharmacology 3 

PHRM 500 Pharmacology Seminar 1 

PHRM 600 Dissertation Research (optional) 3 
* Choice of Two Advanced Courses 

Total 7-10 
Summer Session, Preliminary Exam, The Comprehensive Written Exam of 
Course Work 
Summer Semester 

PHRM 590 Readings or Research in Pharmacology 3 

PHRM 600 Dissertation Research 3 

Total 6 
Year 3 

Fall Semester, Dissertation Proposal Defended Orally Admission to Candidacy 

PHRM 600 Dissertation Research 6 

PHRM 500 Pharmacology Seminar 1 



1 70 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

PHRM 590 Readings or Research in Pharmacology (optional) 3 
Spring Semester 

PHRM 600 Dissertation Research 6 

PHRM 500 Pharmacology Seminar 1 

PHRM 590 Readings or Research in Pharmacology (optional) 3 

Total 7-10 
Summer Session 

PHRM 600 Dissertation Research 3 

Total 3 
Year 4 

Fall Semester 

PHRM 600 Dissertation Research 6 

PHRM 500 Pharmacology Seminar 1 

Total 7 
Spring Semester 

PHRM 600 Dissertation Research 6 

PHRM 500 Pharmacology Seminar 1 

Total 7 

SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS 

Achievement of a grade point average of at least 3.0 (A = 4.0) 

24 credit hours residency 

Completion of research tools required by dissertation committee 

Comprehensive written preliminary exam of course work 

Admission to candidacy 

Oral defense of dissertation proposal 

Submission of dissertation to adviser (10 weeks prior to graduation) 

Corrected dissertation to dissertation committee (8 weeks prior to graduation) 

Completion of an approved dissertation with 24 hours of dissertation credit 

Announcement of dissertation defense (1 week prior notice) 

Oral defense of dissertation 

Submission of approved dissertation to Graduate School (2 copies), graduate 

program director (1 copy), and adviser (1 copy) 3 weeks prior to graduation 

Submission of departmental clearance form 

All dissertations shall be microfilmed and a fee is required. 



Philosophy 



The Department of Philosophy offers a wide range of advanced courses in the 
major areas within the field leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. Students are 
offered a diversified curriculum not dominated by one school of thought or 
method of approach. The broad range of specializations represented by the 
faculty exposes students to a variety of aspects of philosophy and at the same 
time permits them to concentrate on their own particular area of interest. 
Graduate-level courses in such allied fields as the natural and social sciences, the 
arts, linguistics, and law offer supplements to the philosophy curriculum. 

Associated with the department are the Center for Dewey Studies, which is 
preparing and publishing the definitive edition of the collected works of John 
Dewey, and The Library of Living Philosophers, edited by Lewis E. Hahn. The 
University library provides excellent research facilities with 1.8 million volumes, 
an extensive collection of philosophical journals, and important archives in 
American philosophy, including the Open Court papers, and the papers of John 
Dewey, J. H. Tufts, Stephen C. Pepper, Edward Scribner Ames, Henry N. 
Wieman, and Herbert Schneider. These resources contribute to an important 
emphasis on American philosophy in our program. 



Academic Programs Philosophy / 171 

An important part of the graduate program is a philosophy colloquium in 
which faculty and students participate. Distinguished visiting philosophers from 
this country and abroad present lectures to this colloquium throughout the 
academic year. The graduate students have their own philosophy club which 
meets for papers and discussion on alternate weeks. They also edit and publish 
Kinesis, a graduate journal in philosophy. 

The Department of Philosophy offers graduate work leading to the Master of 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Graduate courses in philosophy may be 
used also as a minor in programs leading to the Master of Arts or Master of 
Science in Education degrees. Students who do not plan to continue work in 
philosophy beyond the master's degree level are encouraged to elect a graduate 
minor or to combine philosophy with another subject in a 40-hour double major. 

All graduate students in philosophy are expected to have some supervised 
experience in teaching basic work in the field, either through regular teaching 
assistantships or through special assignments. Opportunities for intern experi- 
ence at area junior or community colleges are made available. 

Admission 

Admission to the philosophy graduate program requires the following: 

1. An application form to be sent to the Graduate School. 

2. Two official transcripts of each school attended to be sent to the Graduate 
School. One transcript should be sent to the department. 

3. A sample of written work, e.g., a term paper written for an undergraduate 
philosophy class, to be sent to the department's director of graduate studies. 

4. Three letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the student's 
work should be requested by the applicant to be sent to the department's 
director of graduate studies. 

5. Scores for the Graduate Record Examination verbal and quantitative scores 
are requested but not required to be submitted to the department. 

The department expects an applicant for admission to its graduate program to 
have had at least 15 semester hours work in philosophy or closely related 
theoretical subjects, including at least one semester in ethics, one in logic, and a 
year in the history of philosophy. The department may waive a portion of this re- 
quirement in favor of maturity and of quality of breadth of academic experience. 
The applicant will be required to make up serious background deficiencies by 
taking appropriate undergraduate philosophy courses without credit. 

Applications for University fellowships and Morris Fellowships should be sent 
to the department by February 1 of the academic year preceding that for which 
application is made. Applications for departmental graduate assistantships 
should be sent to the department by April 1 of that year. 

Master of Arts Degree 

The department's M.A. degree program is designed both for students wishing to 
continue on for a Ph.D. degree within a pre-doctoral program and those who plan 
to receive a terminal master's degree. For the latter students the department 
offers increased opportunities for electives in the field of education or in subjects 
related to philosophy. 

Pre-Doctoral Program. In order to receive an M.A. degree within a program 
leading to the Ph.D. degree the student must fulfill the following requirements: 

1. Complete 30 semester hours of course work in philosophy or allied fields, 6 of 
which may be credited toward preparation of a thesis. 

2. Demonstrate competence in formal logic during the first year of residence 
either through appropriate course work or by passing with a grade of B or 
better an examination equivalent to the Philosophy 320 final suitably 
supplemented with additional materials on Aristotelian logic. 



1 72 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 ■ 

3. Pass an M. A. comprehensive examination on the history of philosophy to be 
taken no later than in the fall semester of the student's second year of 
graduate work. 

4. Demonstrate reading knowledge of one foreign language, usually French or 
German, by passing a proficiency examination in that language or by pass- 
ing the appropriate 488 foreign language course with a grade of B or better. 

5. Fulfill a research writing requirement by either: a) writing an M.A. thesis of 
approximately 50 pages; or b) submitting 3 edited research papers written in 
conjunction with graduate seminars. This requirement should normally be 
met no later than one's second year of residence. The candidate for the M.A. j 
degree will take an oral examination conducted by a 3 member faculty 
committee on the research subject. 

Teaching Master's Program. In order to receive an M.A. degree within a program 
designed to prepare students for two-year college teaching the student must: 

1 . Complete 30 semester hours of course work, 9 of which may be taken outside 
the field of philosophy in either the Department of Higher Education or in 
fields related to philosophy approved by the department's director of 
graduate studies. 

2. Demonstrate competence in formal logic as in 2 above. 

3. Pass the department's M.A. comprehensive examination on the history of 
philosophy as in 3 above. 

4. Fulfill the department's research writing requirement described in 5 above. 
Students within this program are not required to demonstrate reading 

knowledge of a foreign language. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The Ph.D. degree in philosophy is designed to prepare students for college 
teaching and for research in their field of study. To enter the doctoral program 
leading to this degree the student must have received an M.A. degree in philoso- 
phy at either SIUC or some other institution. 

In order to receive the Ph.D. degree the student must fulfill the following 
requirements: 

1. Complete 30 semester hours of course work in philosophy or allied fields 
beyond the M.A. degree. 

2. Demonstrate competence in formal logic during the first year of residence as 
required for the M.A. degree. 

3. Demonstrate a background in the history of philosophy by passing the 
department's M.A. comprehensive examination on the history of philosophy. 
Incoming doctoral students will be expected to take this examination within 
the first year after entering the Ph.D. program. 

4. Fulfill a research tool requirement in one of the following ways: a) demonstrat- 
ing a reading knowledge of 2 foreign languages by proficiency examination 
or by passing the appropriate 488 language courses with grades of B or better; 
b) showing an appropriately higher proficiency in 1 language; or c) 
demonstrating a reading knowledge of 1 foreign language and completing 
satisfactorily at least 2 courses at the graduate level in an outside area 
approved by the director of graduate studies. These courses do not count 
toward the fulfillment of 1 above. 

5. Pass a written preliminary examination on the following 4 areas: meta- 
physics and philosophy of religion; epistemology and philosophy of science; 
value studies (ethics, social philosophy, and aesthetics); and an area of histor- 
ical specialization. This examination will normally be taken only after the 
student has accumulated at least 24 hours of credit beyond the M.A. degree. 

6. Write a doctoral dissertation under the supervision of a faculty dissertation 
committee. This dissertation is started only after the student has completed 



Academic Programs Philosophy / 173 

30 hours of work beyond the M.A. degree and has been admitted to candidacy for 
the Ph.D. degree. After the dissertation has been accepted by the candidate's 
committee, the student is given an oral examination on the dissertation and 
related topics. Should a student fail to complete the dissertation within 5 
years after admittance to candidacy, the student must take an oral examina- 
tion (usually administered by the internal members of the dissertation 
committee) to be admitted to candidacy a second time. 

Physical Education 

Graduate courses in physical education are offered toward the Master of Science 
in Education degree with a major in physical education or for the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree in education with a concentration in physical education. In 
addition, students may elect courses in physical education to complete require- 
ments for a minor when their program of study allows for a minor. 

The minimum number of hours required in physical education at the master's 
level is 24. The total number of hours required for the master's degree is a 
minimum of 30 semester hours. 

Master's Degree 

The departmental requirements for unconditional admission as a master's degree 
candidate are: 

1. Fulfillment of the requirements for admission to the Graduate School. 

2. Presentation of an undergraduate course in kinesiology physiology of 
exercise, human anatomy, motor learning, measurement and evaluation, 
and at least one in educational psychology or psychology of the particular 
field of the student's specialty. Appeals may be made within the special 
program areas. 

3. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. 

A student may be conditionally admitted to the program and may be permitted 
to do graduate course work while removing undergraduate deficiencies. 

Requests for transfer of credits from other institutions will be considered by the 
department only before the completion of the first term of enrollment. 

Requirements 

The following required courses common to all concentrations are PE 500, 503, and 
either 592 or 599. The courses are designed to provide common experiences to all 
students regardless of their specialization. For 599 two bound copies are deposited 
with the department. Two unbound copies are deposited with the Graduate 
School. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Education 

The Department of Physical Education participates in the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in education with a concentration in physical education. See the 
description of the Ph.D. degree in education. 

Inquiries regarding application should be directed to the chair of the Depart- 
ment of Physical Education. 

Physics 

The Department of Physics offers graduate work leading to the Master of Arts and 
Master of Science degrees with a major in physics. Graduate courses in physics 
may also be taken to satisfy teaching specialty requirements for the Master of 
Science in Education degree major in secondary education or in higher education. 



174 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 ] 



In addition to the general requirements of the Graduate School, the student 
must complete PHYS 500A (or mathematics equivalent), 510, 520, and 530. Othe 
specific requirements for the master's degrees are as follows. 



■ 



Master of Arts 

This program is designed primarily for those planning to enter a Ph.D. program. 
A reading knowledge is required in French, German, or Russian as demonstrated] 
by passing one of the Educational Testing Service's graduate foreign language 
examinations administered by the testing center of the University's Career 
Planning and Placement Center or by passing FL 488 with a grade of A or B. 

The M.A. degree major in physics will be granted on the basis of a research 
paper and 30 semester hours of course work, of which 22 semester hours must be 
at the 500 level. Each candidate for the M.A. degree is required to earn one credit 
in PHYS 581 by lecturing in the graduate seminar and is required to pass an 
examination, written or oral or both, covering graduate work including the 
research paper. This examination is given by the student's advisory committee. 

Master of Science 

This program is specifically designed for those who wish a professional degree 
and do not plan to continue beyond the master's level. A reading knowledge of a 
foreign language or demonstrated competence of computer skill is required. This 
requirement can be met by passing one of the Educational Testing Service's gradu- 
ate foreign language examinations for the language option, or by passing FL 488 
with a grade of A or B, for the language option, or by passing MATH 475a, CS 
464a, or an equivalent course in numerical analysis for the computer skills option. 
English can be substituted for either of the above requirements at the discretion of 
the graduate adviser provided it is not the native language of the candidate. 

A thesis is required, based upon not more than 6 nor less than 3 semester hours 
of 599-level credit. The 599 credit requirement is in addition to the minimum of 
15-hour requirement at the 500 level as stated in this catalog and should be 
distributed preferably over several terms of enrollment. Each candidate for an 
M.S. degree is required to earn one credit in PHYS 581 by lecturing in the graduate 
seminar and is required to pass an examination, written or oral or both, covering 
graduate work including the thesis. This examination is given by the student's 
advisory committee. 

Physiology 

Graduate courses in physiology may be taken leading to the Master of Science or 
the Doctor of Philosophy degrees with a maj or in physiology. Graduate courses in 
physiology may also contribute to a program leading to a Master of Science 
degree major in biological sciences or to a teaching specialty for the Master of 
Science in Education degree major in secondary education or in higher education. 

The Department of Physiology offers advanced training in mammalian 
physiology, cellular and comparative physiology, endocrinology and pharmacol- 
ogy, biophysics, and human anatomy. Students entering the graduate training 
program are advised to plan the course work so as to acquire a broad knowledge of 
the field before emphasizing one of these sub-disciplines. The advisory system in 
the department is set up to help students in planning their work. All graduate 
training programs in the department are subject to approval of the graduate 
training committee of the department. 

Each term the student must be engaged in a training assignment which 
supplements formal course work and will consist of research or teaching or both. 
The student is required to have participated in both types of activities, research 



Academic Programs Physiology / 175 

and teaching, as a graduate student at SIUC as a condition for receiving a 
graduate degree. 

Prerequisites for graduate training with a major in physiology usually include 
the equivalent of an undergraduate major in one of the biological sciences, plus 
inorganic and organic chemistry and a minimum of one year each of physics and 
mathematics. Students with undergraduate training in related areas, such as 
chemistry, physics, mathematics, computer science, psychology, or engineering 
are strongly encouraged to consider graduate work in physiology; deficiencies in 
the requirements listed above can be made up early in graduate training. 

Master's Degree 

To complete the master's degree with a major in physiology, the student must 
ordinarily have completed a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate credit. 
The student is required to pass an oral or written examination over the field of 
physiology and the thesis topic, and must present an acceptable thesis dem- 
onstrating ability to perform high quality research under supervision. 

Equivalent work completed at other institutions or in other departments may 
be substituted for a part of the course requirements for graduate work in 
physiology. 

Master's students are encouraged but not required to attain competence in at 
least one research tool (computer sciences, statistics, electronics, advanced 
mathematics, electron microscopy, etc.). Competence may be demonstrated by 
successful completion of appropriate courses or by private study, as determined 
by the student's graduate advisory committee. A minor is not required for the 
master's degree major in physiology; however, a student may elect to obtain a 
minor in any other intellectual area approved by the department. 

Doctoral Program 

Students entering the doctoral program major in physiology should present as a 
minimum the requirements listed above for the master's degree program. In 
addition, it is strongly recommended that the doctoral student have completed 
calculus and physical chemistry. Students with prior training in chemistry, 
physics, engineering, computer sciences, etc., can usually expect to spend some 
additional time acquiring the requisite biological sciences background. 

For admission to doctoral candidacy, the doctoral student should have 
completed a reasonably broad spectrum of courses offered by the department, 
should have acquired a competence in two of the research tools mentioned above, 
and must have successfully passed a written preliminary examination. 

Ordinarily, doctoral students should expect to spend a minimum of 3 years 
beyond the bachelor's degree or 2 years beyond the master's degree, in residence. 
They will be required to present an acceptable dissertation describing original 
research performed with minimal supervision and deemed by their graduate 
committee to be of such quality as to merit publication in the refereed literature of 
the field. A final oral examination will be held over the field of the dissertation. 



Plant and Soil Science 

The Department of Plant and Soil Science offers programs of study leading to the 
Master of Science degree with a major in plant and soil science with concentrations 
in the areas of crop, soil, and horticultural sciences; an emphasis in environmen- 
tal studies in agriculture is also available in each of these concentrations. 
Supporting courses in botany, microbiology, chemistry, statistics, and other 
areas essential to research in the student's chosen field may be selected. 
Supporting courses are selected on an individual basis by the student and the 
advisory committee. Once the general field has been selected, the research and 



176 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

thesis may be completed in any one of the many divisions of that field. In fieldi 
crops, the research may be directed toward crop production and management, 
weeds and pest control, or plant breeding and genetics; in horticulture, the 
research and thesis may be in landscape design, vegetables, tree-fruits, small- 
fruits, floricultural and ornamental plants, plant tissue culture, or turf manage- 
ment; in soils, the research may relate to soil fertility, soil physics, soil, 
microbiology, soil chemistry, or soil and water conservation; in environmental! 
studies, the research may be directed toward sound pollution, water pollution,, 
reclamation of strip-mined soil, or agricultural chemical pollution problems. 
Often two of these more restricted areas can be combined in one thesis problem. 
Students interested in plant and soil science at the doctoral level can be admitted ; 
to a program of study leading to the Ph.D. degree in botany. The program, which: 
is administered by the Graduate School through the Department of Botany, is^ 
adequately flexible to allow students to explore such interests as plant physiology, 
plant nutrition, chemical control of plant growth, plant genetics, etc. 

Admission 

Application for admission to graduate study in the department should be directed 
to the Graduate School. The applicant must have the registrar of each college 
previously attended send an official transcript directly to the Graduate School. In 
addition applicants should send a letter directly to the chair of the Department of 
Plant and Soil Science expressing their professional and personal career 
objectives. Applicants should also request that four persons who can evaluate the 
student's academic ability write letters directly to the chair in their behalf. Final 
admission to the program and a particular concentration administered by the 
Department of Plant and Soil Science is made by the department. Minimal 
admission requirements to the program are: a) completion of the plant and soil 
science undergraduate requirements and b) a minimal grade point average of 2.7 
(A = 4.0). The students who do not meet the requirement of completing the required 
courses in the undergraduate program in plant and soil science may apply to 
enroll as unclassified students to make up these deficiencies. Undergraduate 
course work taken to correct these deficiencies will not apply to the minimum 
requirements for the master's degree. Students entering the plant and soil science 
graduate program with a GPA below 2.70 are accepted on a conditional basis and 
must enroll in 12 hours of structured courses at the 400-500 level and make a GPA 
of 3.0 or be suspended from the program. 

Program Requirements 

Minimum requirements for the master's degree may be fulfilled by satisfactory 
completion of 30 semester hours of graduate credit. Of the 15 hours required at the 
500 level, no more than 10 credit hours of unstructured courses may be counted 
toward the degree. If the student writes a thesis, 15 semester hours (which may 
include thesis credits) must be in plant and soil science courses; if the student 
submits a research paper (non-thesis option), 20 semester hours must be in plant 
and soil science courses. There is no foreign language requirement. 

Each student, whether in the thesis or non-thesis option will be assigned a 
mutually agreed upon major professor to direct the program. The major professor 
will serve as chair of the student's advisory committee which will consist of at 
least 3 members from within the department and 1 member from another 
department. Each master's degree candidate must pass a comprehensive oral 
examination covering graduate work including the thesis or research paper. 

Political Science 

The Department of Political Science endeavors to accommodate the special and 
general interests of students through a broad curriculum, individualized pro- 



Academic Programs Political Science / 177 

grams, and varied teaching and research assistantships. The department takes a 
personal interest in its students throughout their period of enrollment and assists 
them in finding satisfying professional employment upon graduation. Graduates 
now hold academic appointments in 60 American universities and colleges and 
more than a dozen foreign institutions of higher education. Graduates are also 
employed in various governmental agencies at the national, state, and local level. 

The professional interests of the faculty range across all fields of political 
science, and have resulted in significant scholarly publications and presenta- 
tions at professional meetings. 

Graduate programs in the Department of Political Science may be designed to 
lead to Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees with a major in political 
science, and a Master of Public Affairs degree. Graduate work in political science 
may be taken to satisfy requirements for a teaching specialty for the Master of 
Science in Education degree with a major in either secondary education or higher 
education. Graduate work in political science may also serve as a cognate field for 
a student majoring in another discipline. 

Provisions of this publication are supplemented by policies made explicit in the 
regulations and procedurees of the graduate studies program of the Department 
of Political Science and made available to all graduate students. 

Application Procedures 

Application for admission to graduate study in political science and all post- 
secondary education transcripts should be directed to the Graduate School. Other 
application materials should be sent to the director of graduate studies, Depart- 
ment of Political Science. These materials consist of (1) three letters of recom- 
mendation from persons who can evaluate the applicant's academic ability; (2) a 
careful explanation of reasons for seeking graduate study; and (3) scores on the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE) verbal and quantitative tests. Foreign 
students applying from abroad are not required to submit GRE scores, but are 
advised to do so if they are applying for financial assistance. Foreign students 
must have taken the test of English as a foreign language (TOEFL) and passed 
the examination with a score of at least 550. In exceptional cases the GRE may be 
waived as an admission requirement, but it must be taken at the first offering of 
the examination after the student enters the program. Application material, 
including instructions for applying for financial assistance, may be obtained 
from the director of graduate studies, Department of Political Science. Applica- 
tions and supporting materials should be submitted at least four weeks before the 
term of registration. Those applying for graduate assistantships or fellowships 
should complete their applications by February 1. 

Master of Arts Degree Requirements 

Admission. Applicants for the Master of Arts degree program are admitted only 
with the approval of the graduate studies committee of the department. The 
department imposes requirements for admission in addition to those of the 
Graduate School. The department will ordinarily accept as candidates for the 
Master of Arts degree only those applicants who (1) have graduated from an 
accredited four year college or university; (2) have completed a minimum of 24 
quarter or 16 semester hours in government or political science; (3) have a 2.7 
(4-point scale) overall grade point average or, alternatively, have a 2.9 overall 
grade point average for the last 2 years of undergraduate work; and (4) have a 3.0 
average in government or political science. 

Retention. Retention is governed by the rules of the Graduate School. Students 
should avoid the accumulation of incomplete grades. No student with more than 2 
incomplete grades can be awarded a graduate student appointment, and a student 



178 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

holding a graduate student appointment is subject to having the appointment 
terminated upon acquiring 2 or more incomplete grades. 

Course Work. The director of graduate studies serves as adviser to each M.A. 
student until an advisory committee has been selected by the student with the 
approval of the director, normally no later than the middle of the student's first 
semester in residence. The advisory committee must approve the student's 
program. The student must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of acceptable 
graduate credit to qualify for the Master of Arts degree. A maximum of 12 hours 
can be earned in 400-level courses. A minimum of 6 semester hours must be 
completed in each of 3 of the areas of emphasis listed under the Ph.D. 
requirements. M.A. candidates must complete pro-seminars in at least 2 of the 3 
areas of emphasis offered by the student for examination except in cases of 
cognate fields that do not stipulate pro-seminar requirements. The selection of 
areas of emphasis must be approved by the student's advisory committee. 

The student who completes the minimum of 30 semester hours of course work 
may devote no more than 6 of those hours to courses taken outside of the 
department unless the work is in an approved cognate area. In the latter case, a 
maximum of 12 hours in the cognate area may be counted toward the fulfillment 
of area and degree requirements. 

Each candidate for the Master of Arts degree must complete POLS 500. 
Proficiency in one research tool complementing the selected areas of emphasis is 
also required, i.e., statistics, data management, or foreign language. Methods of 
demonstrating proficiency are the same as those required of Ph.D. students. A 
student may count a maximum of 6 semester hours of 400or 500-level tool course 
work toward partial completion of degree requirements, provided that (1) no more 
than 6 semester hours of an approved cognate area are counted as part of the 30 
semester hours and (2) the tool courses are not counted as fulfilling one of the area 
requirements. 

Thesis. In addition to the required course work, the student must submit a thesis. 
A student may receive a maximum of 6 hours credit for the thesis. Before 
registering for thesis credit, the student must have an overall GPA in M.A. work 
of at least 3.0 (A = 4.0) and must have completed the research tool requirement and 
selected a thesis committee approved by the director of graduate studies. The 
membership of the advisory committee and the thesis committee will normally be 
different from that of the advisory committee. A prospectus outlining the research 
proposed for the thesis must be approved by the members of the thesis committee 
and filed with the director of graduate studies. 

A final oral examination conducted by the appropriate committee and open to 
the public will cover the thesis and the student's general competence in political 
science. A student may not take the examination if there are any incomplete 
grades on record except by petition to the graduate studies committee. If the 
student fails the examination or if the thesis is rejected, the student may be 
dropped from the department's degree program or may submit a new or revised 
thesis or repeat the examination at the discretion of the examining committee. 

Copies of the thesis should be submitted to the student's thesis committee 
members no later than one week before the scheduled final oral examination. A 
copy of the approved thesis must be filed with the director of graduate studies. 

Exceptions. An exception from these rules must be justified in a petition 
approved and signed by the student's committee members, submitted to the 
director of graduate studies and approved by the members of the graduate studies 
committee at a scheduled meeting. 



Academic Programs Political Science / 179 

Master of Public Affairs Degree Requirements 

Admission. Students are admitted to either pre-entry or mid-career status. To be 
admitted as a mid-career student, the student must have at least one year of 
professional experience in a public or quasi-public agency. Students having less 
than one year of professional experience are admitted to pre-entry status. 

Applications for admission should be directed to the Graduate School and the 
director, Master of Public Affairs degree program, Department of Political 
Science. To be considered for admission, applicants must have: (1) graduated 
from an accredited four-year college or university and (2) received an overall 
grade point average of 2.7 (4.0 scale) or, alternatively, a 2.9 overall grade point 
average for the last two years of undergraduate work. In instances where a 
candidate's promise is indicated by professional experience rather than under- 
graduate record, consideration will be given on an individual basis to admission 
or conditional admission. Retention is governed by the standards of the Graduate 
School. 

Degree Requirements. M.P.A. students complete a 42 semester hour program of 
study, as follows: (1) a 5-course core curriculum, totaling 15 credit hours, with a 
minimum of 2.8 grade point average, (2) 18 credit hours of elective course work, 6 
of which must be earned in graduate level courses in the Department of Political 
Science, (3) a research paper in public affairs, for which 3 credit hours are 
awarded, (4) an oral examination, and (5) an internship, for which 6 credit hours 
are earned. Of the 33 hours of graduate level course work, at least 18 credit hours 
must be taken in the Department of Political Science. Each of these requirements 
is described more fully below. 

Prerequisites. Students lacking undergraduate preparation in American gov- 
ernment and public administration must complete GSB 212 and POLS 340 
during their first semester of study. Exceptions to this may be granted to mid- 
career students, on a case-by-case basis. Competence in statistics is required 
before enrollment in certain core courses and may be demonstrated by completion 
of an appropriate graduate level course, or, on occasion, by previous under- 
graduate course work. 

The Core Curriculum. The core curriculum consists of the following five courses. 

POLS 540-3 Environment of Public Administration 

POLS 542-3 Public Budgeting and Fiscal Management 

POLS 543-3 Public Personnel Management 

POLS 544-3 Program Analysis and Evaluation 

POLS 545-3 Organization Theory and Behavior 

To facilitate the work of part-time (employed) students, each of the core courses 
is offered in the evening at least once every 3 years. A substitution for 1 core course 
may be allowed if the substituted course is similar in content to the particular core 
course or if competence in the subject matter of the course is clearly evident. 

Electives. Elective courses may be selected from the offerings of various 
departments across the University, as well as those of the Department of Political 
Science. The student and the faculty adviser consult in selecting courses best 
suited to the student's individual career goals, which may be either specific or 
general in nature. 

The Research Report. The research report is to be an examination of some issue 
or problem in public administration. It may be either theoretical or applied, or 
some combination of theoretical and applied concerns. Early preparation for the 
research project and related report begins during the student's first semester of 



180 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

study, and completion is normally a prerequisite for internship placement. The 
report is written under the supervision of the student's faculty committee. 

The Oral Examination. After completion of course work and the research report, 
an oral examination is scheduled and conducted by the student's faculty 
committee. The examination gives attention to course work as well as the 
methodology and findings of the research report. After satisfactory performance 
in the oral examination, a copy of the approved research report must be filed with 
the Graduate School and program director. Students who fail the examination 
are allowed a second examination after remedial work as recommended by the 
committee. Candidates who fail more than once are dropped from the program. 

The Internship. Pre-entry students must serve an internship in a governmental 
gency, unless a substitution as described below is made. The internship is usually 
for 4.5 months of full-time work or 9 months of half-time work, and it provides a 
stipend as negotiated by representatives of the program and agency. The 
internship is normally scheduled to begin after course work and the research 
report have been completed. Mid-career students receive credit for the internship 
on the basis of previous professional experience and submission of a paper as 
specified in program guidelines. 

The student may substitute 6 semester hours of course work for the internship if 
a request is approved by the program director or if an appropriate internship is 
not available. 

Concurrent Degrees in Law and Public Affairs 

Students who have been admitted separately to the Southern Illinois University 
School of Law and graduate program in public affairs may study concurrently for 
the Juris Doctor and Master of Public Affairs degrees. Students interested in 
concurrent study should inform both programs before entering the second 
academic year of either program and will register as law students with a minor in 
public affairs. Each program will maintain records and evaluate final degree 
requirements as if the student were enrolled in only one program. 

Concurrent study students must complete a minimum of 81 semester hours of 
School of Law credits which meet all law area requirements, as well as all M.P. A. 
requirements to receive the J.D. degree. Students will not be permitted to take 
course work outside the prescribed law curriculum during the first year of law 
classwork. Students may enroll for both law and graduate course work during 
subsequent years provided a minimum of 10 semester hours of law and 12 
semester hours total are taken in any term which has law course enrollment. 

Concurrent study students must complete a minimum of 42 semester hours 
which meet the distribution requirements of the M.P.A. program to receive the 
M.P. A. degree. A maximum of 6 semester hours of School of Law credits of a 
public affairs nature (for example administrative law, environmental law, labor 
law, natural resources law) may be applied to both J.D. and M.P.A. requirements 
if approved by the director of the M.P.A. program. All concurrent study students 
will complete either the M.P.A. internship experience and project, or the applied 
study project. Internships will normally be scheduled during the third or fourth 
year of concurrent study. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree Requirements 

Admission. Applicants for the doctoral degree are admitted only with the ap- 
proval of the graduate studies committee of the department. In addition to 
Graduate School and other departmental requirements, the committee ordinarily 
requires a grade point average of 3.5 (4-point scale) in graduate-level work and 
adequate background in political science. Admission is also possible through the 
accelerated entry option (see below) as well as direct entry from baccaluareate 



Academic Programs Political Science / 181 

programs in those instances where the graduate studies committee identifies 
high achievement and potential in an applicant's undergraduate work. Appli- 
cants for direct entry should contact the director of graduate studies, Department 
of Political Science, for the most recent departmental regulations and procedures 
governing admission under this option. 

Retention. Retention is governed by the rules of the Graduate School. Students 
should avoid accumulating incomplete grades. Students holding graduate 
assistant appointments are expected to make reasonable progress toward a 
degree. No student with more than 2 incomplete grades can be awarded a 
graduate assistant appointment, and a student holding a graduate assistant 
appointment is subject to having the appointment terminated upon acquiring 
two or more incomplete grades. 

Accelerated Entry into the Ph.D. Degree Program. A student enrolled in the M. A. 
degree program may petition the graduate studies committee after 2 semesters in 
residence for waiver of the requirement of an M.A. degree as prerequisite for ad- 
mission to the doctoral program, and for direct entry to the Ph.D. degree program 
in accordance with the following conditions. First, the student must be certified 
by the advisory committee to be an outstanding graduate student. In so doing, the 
committee must consider a wide range of supporting evidence including but not 
restricted to GPA, GRE, M.A. degree tool requirement, and evaluative letters from 
all graduate instructors from whom the student has taken courses. Second, the 
student must present 1 graduate research paper of outstanding quality or a pub- 
lished article of appropriate character and quality. The petition accompanied by 
the advisory committee recommendation and the supporting evidence must be 
presented to the graduate studies committee which will make the final decision on 
the petition. If admitted, the student will proceed toward the Ph.D. degree in 
accordance with the established rules of the department and Graduate School. 

Direct Entry into the Ph.D. Degree Program. Students admitted under the direct 
entry option are required to fulfill M.A. degree method, tool, and course work 
requirements as part of the Ph.D. degree work. Additional measures of progress 
may be required by the student's advisory committee. 

Program of Study. The work of a Ph.D. student is directed toward admission to 
candidacy for the doctorate, for which the student must meet the residency 
requirement, meet course, methods, and research tool requirements, maintain a 
GPA of at least 3.5, and pass preliminary examinations in 4 areas of emphasis. 

The student must be in residence for at least 1 year (2 semesters in each of which 
the student completes at least 9 hours or 6 hours if the student holds a graduate 
assistantship) after admission to the Ph.D. program before preliminary examina- 
tions can be taken. Residence shall be counted from the time the student passes the 
final examinations for the master's degree or, in cases of accelerated entry or direct 
post-baccalaureate entry to the Ph.D. degree program, when the student has met 
all graduate school and departmental requirements pertaining to those options. 

The student's program must be approved by an advisory committee selected by 
the student and approved by the director of graduate studies. The members of the 
advisory committee should represent the student's areas of emphasis. 

The student prepares in 4 areas of emphasis, in 3 of which written examinations 
and an oral examination must be passed. In the examination areas, 9 hours of 
course work at the graduate level must be completed, including the appropriate pro- 
seminar in each area; not more than 3 hours of readings or individual research 
may be counted in the 9 hours for each area. In the non-examination fourth area, 
the appropriate pro-seminar and 3 more hours (which cannot be readings or 
individual research) are required. The areas of emphasis are: political theory; 



182 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

methodology; American government and politics; public law; public administra- 
tion and policy analysis; comparative government and politics; international 
relations, law, and organization; a cognate or interdisciplinary field. 

The student must also complete the requirements for 2 research tools (see below) 
and the specialized research methods course best complementing the student's 
areas of study. The student's advisory committee may require additional course 
work, in or out of the areas of examination. The student, before enrolling in POLS 
590, Readings or POLS 591, Individual Research, must have completed the 
appropriate pro-seminar for the area in which readings or individual research is 
to be done. At least half of all course work must be in 500 level courses. 

Research Tools and Methods.. The Ph.D. is a research degree, and students must 
acquire knowledge of research tools and methods. 

1. Research tools: statistics, data management, foreign language. All Ph.D. 
students must satisfy a statistics requirement by successfully completing MATH 
516a and b or another statistics sequence approved by the graduate studies 
committee. Students must also satisfy one additional tool requirement. A data 
management tool may be satisfied by POLS 503a or b. A foreign language tool 
may be satisfied by a minimum score of 465 on the ETS examination or by 
successful completion of a 488 course in the Department of Foreign Languages 
and Literatures. A special examination approved by the graduate studies 
committee may be offered for a language not covered by ETS or the Department of 
Foreign Languages. 

Students whose native language is not English may offer English to satisfy the 
additional tool requirement. 

2. Methods of research. 

a. POLS 500 is a general methodology course. It is required of M. A. students 
and of Ph.D. students who have not had a comparable graduate level methodol- 
ogy course. 

b. Specialized methods of research. Students are required to complete success- 
fully one specialized methods course, chosen from the POLS 501 sequence or 
another appropriate course, such as EPSY 508 or 531, HIST 492, PSYCH 522a or b 
or 527, or SOC 513. The course selected should be the one most appropriate to the 
student's primary area of emphasis. 

This department is amenable to self-tailored programs subject to the expertise 
of the faculty and the approval of the graduate studies committee. Such approved 
programs may suggest the need for tools in addition to or in place of those tools 
specified in this section. 

Preliminary Examinations. Before preliminary examinations can be scheduled 
a student must have completed all course work, 2 research tools, and a specialized 
methodology course, have a grade point average of at least 3.5, and have had a 
preliminary examination committee approved by the director of graduate studies. 
Students may not take preliminary examinations if there are any incomplete 
grades on their records except by petition to the graduate studies committee. 

The 3 written preliminary examinations are to be completed within a period of 
10 days; an oral examination follows within 1 week of the last written examina- 
tion upon the approval of the examination committee. A student who passes the 
written and oral examinations is advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree; a 
student who does not pass the examinations may be permitted to retake them at a 
later date or be dropped from the degree program of the department, at the 
discretion of the advisory committee and the graduate studies committee. 

Dissertation. A dissertation must be written under the direction of and with the 
approval of a five member committee, one of whom must be from outside the 
Department of Political Science. The membership of the dissertation committee 



Academic Programs Political Science / 183 

will normally be different from that of the advisory committee. A dissertation 
prospectus must be approved by the members of the dissertation committee and 
filed with the director of graduate studies. Students must register for a minimum 
of 24 hours of dissertation credit, POLS 600, and cannot register for dissertation 
credit until they have been admitted to candidacy or, with the approval of the 
advisory committee and the director of graduate studies, until the term during 
which preliminary examinations are scheduled. 

An acceptable dissertation must be completed within 5 years after admission to 
candidacy, or the student will have to repeat preliminary examinations. Final 
copies of the dissertation should be submitted to the members of the dissertation 
committee no later than 10 days before the scheduled oral examination. The 
success of a final oral examination devoted primarily to a defense of the 
dissertation and open to the public will complete the requirements for the Doctor 
of Philosophy degree. A final copy of the dissertation must be filed with the 
director of graduate studies. 

Cooperative Program with Sangamon State University 

The Department of Political Science at SIUC has an agreement with the political 
studies program at Sangamon State University in Springfield to facilitate the 
entry of SSU political studies students into the SIUC political science Ph.D. 
degree program. SIUC will accept appropriate SSU graduate credits to fulfill 
course work, methodology, and research tool requirements. SSU students can 
qualify for accelerated entry into the SIUC doctoral program after 2 semesters of 
study at SSU with 24 semester hours completed, a 3.5 GPA, 2 proseminars, and 
written evaluations from course instructors. A number of SSU faculty are eligible 
to serve on graduate student examination and dissertation committees. SIUC 
will accept up to 12 hours credit for course work, research projects, and 
internships completed under SSU faculty direction towards the SIUC political 
science Ph.D. degree. Other course work, residency, and dissertation require- 
ments of the SIUC program must be met as described in other sections of this 
catalog. For more detailed information, ask the director of graduate studies, 
Department of Political Science, SIUC. 

Application of Rules and Exceptions. The department's rules in force at the time 
of the student's admission to the Ph.D. program will apply while the student is in 
the program unless (1) the student voluntarily selects a newer set of rules in toto 
before graduation or (2) the time between admission to the Ph.D. program and 
passing the preliminary examinations exceeds 5 years. In the latter case, the stu- 
dent will automatically come under the rules in force at the beginning of the sixth 
year and every fifth year thereafter until the preliminary examinations are passed. 
Requests for exceptions to any of the above requirements must be presented in a 
petition approved and signed by the members of the student's committee, 
submitted to the director of graduate studies, and approved at a scheduled 
meeting of the graduate studies committee. 

Psychology 

The Department of Psychology offers graduate work leading to the Master of 
Arts, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees with a major in 
psychology with concentrations in the following areas: experimental, clinical, 
and counseling psychology. The primary emphasis is on doctoral training, for 
which the master's degree is a prerequisite. 

The goal of graduate study in the Department of Psychology at SIUC is to 
develop psychologists who will have a broad perspective and scientific sophistica- 
tion as well as the requisite skills to advance the field of psychology and meet 



184 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2\ 

changing needs. The program emphasizes formal course work in the core- 
curriculum and in the concentrations, preprofessional activities in training 
assignments, research, and practicum opportunities. 

Admission and Advisement 

Separate application forms must be submitted to the Department of Psychology 
and to the Graduate School. Graduate School and departmental application 
forms may be obtained from the Department of Psychology. Separate forms are 
not required for application for financial assistance, except for Graduate School 
fellowships. Students will be accepted for graduate work in psychology only upon 
approval by the departmental admissions committee as well as the Graduate 
School. Evaluations of applicants by the departmental admissions committee are 
based on information from the application form, GRE scores, transcripts, and 
letters of recommendation. 

Upon admission to the department, each student is assigned to a faculty 
adviser, who assists in academic matters, including the planning of the student's 
program of study: required courses, planned electives, anticipated dates for 
fulfillment of specified requirements, etc. 

A new adviser may be assigned to a student for 2 reasons: (a) the student or 
adviser may request a change of adviser; (b) the student may change to a different 
major area. Requests for a change of adviser should be made in writing to the 
student's major area committee. To change majors, the student should petition 
the area subcommittee of the new major. 

Core Curriculum 

During the first year all students are required to take a two course sequence in 
quantitative methods and research design (522a and b, or the equivalent). All stu- 
dents enrolled in the master's degree program should have completed the thesis 
requirement (599, 4-6 hours) by the end of the second year. Six additional elective 
courses in areas other than the major are required in order to provide breadth as 
well as some degree of depth in the total field of psychology. The student selects 
electives in consultation with the adviser. Those in the experimental program 
select from the following areas, subject to the approval of the faculty teaching in 
those areas: applied experimental, biopsychology, learning or any other area in 
the department or an approved area outside the department. Students in the clini- 
cal and counseling programs meet this requirement by selecting courses from the 
above area with the stipulation that, at minimum, the distribution of courses meet 
the American Psychological Association accreditation requirements. 

Areas of Concentration 

EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

The experimental psychology program provides students with thorough educa- 
tion and training in the theoretical and research methods applicable to the study 
of behavior. The program is designed to enable students to pursue a variety of 
career paths in teaching, research, and applied research in academic or 
nonacademic settings. The student is expected to emphasize at least 1 of the 3 
areas of experimental psychology: applied experimental psychology, biopsychol- 
ogy, or learning. In addition to general departmental requirements, students in 
the experimental psychology concentration are required to take a course in 
computer programming and must register for research credit (593, 594a, 599, or 
600) during all but the first 2 semesters of residence. As an integral part of their 
training, students are expected to become active participants in 1 or more ongoing 
faculty research programs. 

In addition, students in applied experimental psychology must take the follow- 
ing courses: 564, 569, 571, 594a, three additional courses in research methodology, 
and an additional course in a computer programming language. PSYCH 571 



Academic Programs Psychology / 185 

should be taken during the first two semesters in residence, and 569 during the 
second, third, and fourth years. Students in biopsychology must take 514, an ap- 
proved course in neuroanatomy, and 6 additional courses distributed in 2 different 
areas. One of these areas must be either physiological or developmental psychol- 
ogy. The second area can be either physiological, developmental, or some other 
approved area such as learning and memory, sensation and perception, or cogni- 
tion and language. Students in learning must take 510, 51 1 , and at least one of the 
following courses: 407, 411, 515, and 520. Additional courses and topical semi- 
nars, as approved by the student's advisory committee, complete the requirements. 

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

The clinical psychology program, approved by the Education and Training 
Board of the American Psychological Association, is designed to develop clinical 
psychologists for careers in clinical service, teaching, and research. All clinical 
students take the core of courses and receive early and continued practicum 
training in both clinical activities and research. Individual interests are accom- 
modated through electives and training assignments and through specialty 
programs. The following courses are required of all clinical students: 432, 523, 
530a and b, 531, 535, 540, 594e, 598. 

In addition to the clinical core students take a minimum of 6 additional courses 
in their emphasis: (1) general clinical students are required to take an assessment 
practicum and an additional semester of therapy practicum plus 4 electives; (2) 
the experimental clinical students are expected in their 6 additional courses to 
take those which have a research orientation, e.g., 532, 533, 539, etc.; in addition, 
except when enrolled for thesis or dissertation hours, the student is expected to be 
involved in research each term after the first year; (3) students in the child clinical 
emphasis are required to take 556 plus 5 electives. In addition it is expected that 
they will take 552 and 554 as a part of departmental electives. 

COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

The counseling psychology program, approved by the Education and Training 
Board of the American Psychological Association, is designed to teach students a 
wide range of skills which will prepare them to function as scientist-practitioners. 
Graduates are qualified for employment in a university setting (either in an 
academic department or a counseling center), in hospitals, community agencies, 
and educational and correctional institutions. The student is expected to develop 
competence in counseling, psychological assessment, consultation, research, and 
teaching. The required courses are as follows: 526, 530a, 536, 538 547, 548, 585, and 
594f. 

Research, Practicum, and Training Assignments 

Research or practica are required in each area of concentration. In addition, each 
term the student must be engaged in a training assignment which supplements 
formal course work by professional activities such as research, teaching, or 
clinical service. The assignment varies according to the needs, professional goals, 
and competencies of the student, and increases in responsibility as the student 
progresses. The assignments require from 10 to 20 hours of service per week. This 
is a degree requirement of all students each term and is independent of any 
financial support. Therefore, each term the student signs up for one hour of 597. 

Master's Degree Requirements 

The master's degree requires a minimum of 48 semester hours of acceptable 
graduate credit, distributed according to the requirements of the student's major 
area, and the completion of an approved thesis. The master's thesis may be either 
original research or the replication of an important study. The master's degree is 
a prerequisite for the doctorate. 



186 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

Doctoral Requirements 

Admission. Admission to the Ph.D. program requires a master's degree, a grade 
point average of 3.25 or above in graduate studies, and acceptance by the 
department. A student who receives the master's degree from SIUC must apply 
formally to the Graduate School for admission to doctoral-level study, and be 
approved by the department chair. 

Records of students entering the program with a master's degree from another 
institution are evaluated by the departmental admissions committee which notes 
deficiencies, recommends methods for removing them, and specifies a time limit 
to do so. Such deficiencies must be removed before the student can be classified as 
a Ph.D. candidate. The student is recommended to the graduate dean for 
admission to Ph.D. candidacy only when the statistics sequence, core require- 
ments, and all of the preliminary examinations have been completed. 

Accelerated Entry into Ph.D. Degree Program. Students enrolled in the M.A. 
degree program may be admitted directly to the Ph.D. degree program following 
departmental certification of graduate work comparable to a master's degree in 
psychology at SIUC. Accelerated entry is acceptable only for students who have 
completed substantial work in other programs in psychology which grant the 
Ph.D. degree but not a master's degree. Students seeking accelerated entry may 
apply after enrollment at the master's level for one semester. Applications for 
accelerated entry are reviewed and decided by a faculty committee appointed by 
the department chair. 

Internship. Doctoral students who are concentrating in clinical or counseling 
psychology must complete an approved internship: 48 weeks for clinical students, 
and the equivalent of 9 months for counseling students. The timing of the 
internship varies from program to program; clinical students may take their 
internship at any time after the completion of the M.A. degree. In order to intern 
in the third year, a master's thesis prospectus must be approved by the end of the 
fall semester of the second year. They will not be approved for internship unless 
this stipulation is met. Alternatively, they may opt to complete all academic 
requirements before internship. Counseling students are approved for internship 
after completion of 3 years of academic work, unless they have opted for a 
concurrent internship. In the latter case, the student carries a half-time intern- 
ship for 2 years concurrent with school attendance. Since the internship is viewed 
as an integral part of training, the Ph.D. degree is not awarded until the 
completion of all academic work and the internship. 

Students are responsible, in consultation with their advisers, for scheduling 
and obtaining internships. It is expected that the internships will be with an APA 
approved internship agency, unless an exception has been approved. 

Preliminary Examinations. Ph.D. candidacy is contingent upon successful 
completion of 2 written examinations both of which are composed primarily of 
essay questions requiring substantive knowledge of empirical and theoretical 
topics. Questions are not limited to course content. 

The 2 preliminary examinations cover areas germane to the student's doctoral 
study, areas differing in subject matter and representing, in aggregate, approxi- 
mately 3 years of graduate study. 

Every student is expected to pass each examination on first taking. In any 
event a second failure on a preliminary examination will result in a thorough 
faculty review of the student's entire academic record in order to determine 
whether the student will be allowed to continue in the program and, if continued, 
under what conditions. 



Academic Programs Psychology / 187 



Minor/ Specialization. The minor or specialization examination is tailored by the 
examining committee to the area of study approved for the student. The 
examining committee shall consist of at least 2 faculty members, 1 of whom will 
be designated as chair. After preliminary discussion of a topic area with the 
proposed committee chair and potential committee members, the student must 
meet with the major area director and present for final approval a request for the 
topic area and the examining committee (including additional examiners, if 
appropriate, and alternate readers). 

The student must meet with the committee at least 10 weeks prior to the 
examination in order to agree upon topics to be covered by the examination and to 
decide what additional preparation is necessary to assure adequately prepared 
action. Any changes in topic area or composition of the committee must be 
approved by the major area director. Should the student fail an examination there 
is the option of forming a different committee to administer the second examina- 
tion subject to all the rules stated above. 

Major/ Comprehensive. Fields of concentration for the major/comprehensive 
preliminary examination are listed below: 

1. Experimental. Any one field from the following may be selected for the 
comprehensive examination: applied experimental psychology, biopsychol- 
ogy, learning. 

2. Clinical. The major examination includes the following: psychological 
assessment, psychotherapy, psychopathology, and personality. In addition 
for the student, the examination reflects the specialization emphasis, i.e., 
general, child, or experimental. 

3. Counseling. The major examination includes the following areas: (a) adult 
personal, social, and career development, (b) assessment, (c) group and 
individual counseling theories and techniques, (d) research methodology and 
measurement, and professional issues. 

Major/ comprehensive examinations are scheduled by the department once a 
term, ordinarily within the first 2 weeks. Notices are posted well in advance and 
students are expected to notify the graduate secretary of their intention to take the 
examination. Examination committees are appointed by the chair. 

Dissertation. Each candidate for the Ph.D. degree must write a dissertation 
showing high attainment in independent, original scholarship and creative 
effort. A total of 24 credit hours is required. A maximum of 8 hours of dissertation 
credit may be taken subsequent to passing the minor preliminary examination 
and prior to passing the major preliminary examination. A student may not hold 
a prospectus meeting before successful completion of both minor and major 
examinations. 

Thesis and Dissertation Committee 

Because the thesis or dissertation project and the proposed committee composi- 
tion must be formally approved by the department chair, the student should 
arrange a meeting with the chair well in advance of the prospectus meeting. 

A master's thesis committee consists of 3 members including the chair of the 
committee and a psychology faculty member who is typically from some field 
other than the student's major area of interest. The Ph.D. dissertation committee 
consists of 5 members, 1 of whom serves as chair. One of the members must be 
from a department other than psychology. 

Prospectus. Prior to starting the experimental research on a thesis or disserta- 
tion, a student must submit a written prospectus to each member of the com- 
mittee. A carefully written prospectus ordinarily serves as the opening chapters 



188 Graduate Catalog Chapter 23 

of the thesis or dissertation. The student also prepares an abstract (normally nol 
more than 2 pages) to be posted in the psychology department office one week 
before the prospectus meeting. 

The approval of the prospectus indicates that the committee members accept 
the research design. Faculty members not on the committee may attend the 
prospectus meeting, or may forward suggestions and comments to the committee 
chair prior to the meeting. Prospectus meetings are not scheduled during the 
recess period between semesters. 

If the prospectus is approved with no major modifications, one copy of the 
prospectus and a letter of approval, noting any minor modifications are sent by 
the committee chair to the department chair for filing in the student's permanent 
records. If major modifications are needed, the student may be asked to rewrite 
the prospectus, circulate the revised prospectus, arrange another committee 
meeting, and then file the revised prospectus as above. A prospectus must be 
approved at least one semester before graduation. 

Style. The student has the option of writing the thesis or dissertation in the 
traditional fashion or in journal style. In the latter case, ancillary material (full 
survey of literature, subsidiary analyses, etc.) are placed in the appendices, al- 
though figures and tables appear in the text. The psychology department prefers 
that citations, table headings, etc. follow the APA style (Publication Manual of 
the American Psychological Association, 1983 revision, Washington, D.C.). 

General Procedures. Students should not register for 599 or 600 hours until they 
have supervisors and will actually be using university facilities, or faculty time 
for assistance and direction. 

Prior to graduation (a minimum of 5 weeks for master's students and 8 weeks 
for doctoral students) the candidate must submit a final rough draft of the thesis 
or dissertation to the full committee so that appropriate suggestions can be made. 
At least one week usually expires between the submission of the rough draft and 
the oral examination. 

Number of Copies. Four copies of the complete thesis or dissertation are required: 
two copies are submitted to the Graduate School for placement in the University 
library, and two bound copies — one for the committee chair, and one for the 
departmental thesis and dissertation library. 

Oral Examination 

The Department of Psychology requires an oral examination, conducted by the 
student's thesis or dissertation committee, for each M.A. and Ph.D. candidate. 
The examination covers the thesis or dissertation and also includes questions 
designed to ascertain the student's general competence in psychology. 

Oral examinations are open to all interested observers. Notices of the time and 
place of the examination, and abstracts of the thesis or dissertation, are circulated 
throughout the department and, in the case of Ph.D. examinations, throughout 
the University. Two copies of the abstract should be given to the graduate 
program secretary. 

The candidate obtains copies of the oral examination form and the thesis or 
dissertation evaluation form from the graduate program secretary, and delivers 
them to the committee members on the day of the orals. Orals meetings are not 
scheduled during the recess period between semesters. 

General Information 

Waiving of Course Requirements. Students who wish to have a course waived 
should consult with their advisers, the course instructor, and the head of their 
major area. One of the following recommendations will be made: (a) the course will 



Academic Programs Psychology / 189 

be waived; (b) a proficiency examination (theoretical, practical, or both) will be 
given prior to deciding on the student's request; (c) the request will be refused and 
the student will take the course. A student may appeal the decision by writing a 
letter to the department chair requesting that the case be reviewed. 

Grading Policies. Any student who receives a grade of Inc. is responsible for 
contacting the instructor to determine the time allowed for the completion of the 
course (normally not more than one year). 

For internal records to be used within the department only, pluses and minuses 
are added to the standard A, B, C grades reported to the Office of Admissions and 
Records. 

Student Evaluation. All students are evaluated by the faculty at least once a 
year, at the end of spring semester. In addition, new students are evaluated in the 
beginning of the spring semester (first year), and students on probation at times 
specified in their probation. The evaluation is based on the following criteria: (1) 
academic performance on a ten point rating scale (A + = 10); (2) ratings on the 
training assignment; and (3) progress toward the degree. The student's evalua- 
tion may also be based upon evidence relating to professional attitudes or ethical 
behavior. 

Each student's adviser informs the student of the evaluation and of any faculty 
recommendations as soon as possible after the meeting. In addition, the 
department chair writes a formal letter notifying the student of the evaluation 
and recommendations. 



Public Affairs 

(See Political Science for program description.) 






Radio-Television 

(See Telecommunications for program description.) 

Recreation 

The Department of Recreation offers a broad interdisciplinary program of studies 
preparing students for administrative careers in recreation management. The 
program leads to the Master of Science in Education degree with a major in 
recreation. 

Master of Science in Education Degree 

Graduate work in recreation stresses administration and research and is open 
only to highly qualified students. All students must be admitted to the Graduate 
School in good standing. 

The graduate students in recreation may select from 3 program concentrations, 
each fully accredited by the Council on Accreditation, NRPA, and AAHPER. The 
first concentration, administration of recreation and park systems, focuses on 
skills necessary in the management of local, state, and national recreation pro- 
gram service organizations. The second concentration, recreation resources 
administration, focuses on skills necessary to provide and maintain lands and 
facilities in the local, state, and national park system. The third concentration, 
therapeutic recreation, focuses on skills necessary in the management of public 



190 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

and private organizations which provide a diverse array of therapeutic recreation 
services. 

All concentrations require a minimum of 36 semester hours of course work 
including 3 hours of thesis, 3 hours of research methods, and 4 hours of inferential 
statistics. A student must maintain an overall 3.0 (4 point scale) grade point 
average in order to be eligible for a recommendation to graduate. Upon admission 
to the program a student should select a chair for the thesis supervisory 
committee as soon as is practicable. A minimum of 2 additional graduate faculty 
members, 1 holding rank outside the Department of Recreation, are needed to 
form the full committee. More than 3 graduate faculty members will be appointed 
if necessary. After approval of a thesis topic the student will conduct a research 
effort under the committee's guidance. Upon completion of the research a final 
oral examination covering the thesis is required. 

Graduate students should select 1 of 3 areas of concentration. The decision 
regarding the concentration need not be made prior to enrollment at the Univer- 
sity although the student should most probably make a selection sometime prior 
to the beginning of the second semester of study. 

Major in Recreation 

The areas of concentration and the requirements of each are listed below. 

ADMINISTRATION OF RECREATION AND PARK SYSTEMS CONCENTRATION 

Theory Core 

REC 500-3 Principles of Recreation 

REC 520-3 Park and Recreation Management 

REC 530-3 Programs in Parks and Recreation 

REC 425-3 Planning Park and Recreation Areas 

REC 570-3 Seminar in Recreation Management 

GUID 506-4 Inferential Statistics 
Research Methodology Core (select one) 

REC 550-3 Research in Recreation 

EDL 500-3 Education in Research Methods 
Research Core 

REC 599-3 Thesis 
Total core hours: 28 
Elective hours: 11 
Total hours required: 36 

RECREATION RESOURCE ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION 

Theory Core 

REC 500-3 Principles of Recreation 

REC 520-3 Park and Recreation Management 

REC 425-3 Planning Park and Recreation Areas 

REC 445-3 Outdoor Recreation Management 

REC 570-3 Seminar in Recreation Management 

GUID 506-4 Inferential Statistics 
Research Methodology Core (select one) 

REC 550-3 Research in Recreation 

EDL 500-3 Education in Research Methods 
Research Core 

REC 599-3 Thesis 
Other (May be required if student has not had equivalent courses or professional 
experience prior to entry into the graduate program. Undergraduate deficiency 
courses may be required dependent upon assessment of departmental graduate 
admissions committee.) 

REC 401-3 Fundamentals of Environmental Education 



Academic Programs Recreation / 191 

REC 423-3 Environmental Education 
Total core hours: 28 
Elective hours: 11 
Total hours required: 36 

THERAPEUTIC RECREATION CONCENTRATION 

Theory Core 

REC 500-3 Principles of Recreation 

REC 520-3 Park and Recreation Management 

REC 524-3 Professional Skills in Therapeutic Recreation 

REC 526-3 Professional Issues in Therapeutic Recreation 

GUID 506-4 Inferential Statistics 
Research Methodology Core (select one) 

REC 550-3 Research in Recreation 

EDL 500-3 Education in Research Methods 

REHAB 593-3 Research in Rehabilitation 
Research Core 

REC 599-3 Thesis 
Other (May be required if student has not had equivalent courses or professional 
experience prior to entry into the graduate program. Undergraduate deficiency 
courses may be required dependent upon assessment of departmental graduate 
admissions committee.) 

REC 460-3 Therapeutic Recreation 

REC 461-3 Program Design and Evaluation 

REC 462-3 Facilitation and Leisure Counseling Techniques 

REC 596-3 Internship 
Total core hours: 22 
Elective hours: 14 
Total hours required 36 

Rehabilitation Institute 

In response to pressing human and social needs, the applied field of rehabilitation 
has solidly entrenched itself as a professional discipline. Multidisciplinary 
courses of study have been drawn together from the behavioral, social, and 
medical sciences appropriate to the development of competent practitioners, 
supervisors, and programmers in rehabilitation and welfare agencies. The 
overall program is left purposely broad and flexible to permit the inclusion of 
training innovations and emerging career patterns. 

The Rehabilitation Institute offers graduate programs leading to the Doctor of 
Rehabilitation degree and to a Master of Arts or a Master of Science degree with 
majors in behavior analysis and therapy, rehabilitation administration and 
services, and rehabilitation counseling. 

The Master's Degree Program 

The master's degree programs in rehabilitation administration and services, 
behavior analysis and therapy, and rehabilitation counseling are 45 semester 
hour programs. The distinction between the M.A. and M.S. degrees is one of 
demonstrable research performance. Candidates for the M.S. degree concentrate 
primarily on preparation for entry into the helping profession, and ordinarily 
they complete a project or research paper in their area of concentration. The M.A. 
degree requires a thesis of an experimental nature, in which candidates 
demonstrate their skills in formulating researchable questions, in identifying 
and manipulating experimental variables and in the analysis and the judicious 
reporting of the data. 



192 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 



BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS AND THERAPY 

The behavior analysis and therapy program is a 45 semester hour program 
leading to either an M.A. or M.S. degree. Formal training is offered in behavior 
analysis and behavior therapy with focus on populations and settings such as 
mental retardation, emotional disorders, child behavior, sexual problems, be- 
havioral medicine, child abuse and neglect, biofeedback, and consumer and 
management-related issues. 

Degree Requirements 

In fulfilling the 45 semester hour requirement, the student must complete the 
required courses and at least 18 semester hours of didactic course work in behavior 
analysis and therapy as described below. 

The internship is usually completed following the first spring or during the sec- 
ond fall. Some students seek external internships (out of Southern Illinois area). 
To qualify for one of these internships, students must complete all other program 
requirements including the thesis before leaving for an external internship. 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Asterisks indicate didactic behavior analysis and therapy courses. 

*503-3 Basic Behavior Analysis, taken first fall 

*509a-3 Scientific Methods in Behavior Analysis, taken first fall 

509b-3 Scientific Methods in Behavior Analysis, taken first spring 

*535-3 Behavioral Observation Methods, taken first fall 

512-3 Legal and Ethical Issues in Behavior Analysis 

589-1 Professional Seminar in Behavior Analysis and Therapy, taken first fall 

and spring 

594b-3 Practicum in Behavior Analysis and Therapy 

595-8 to 12 Internship in Rehabilitation 

599 or 593-3 to 6 Thesis or Research Paper 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Asterisks indicate didactic behavior analysis and therapy courses. 

508-3 Complex Behavior Analysis 

*554-3 Behavior Therapy 

*543-3 Child Behavior 

*568-3 Sexual Behavior and Rehabilitation 

*545-3 Behavior Modification in Mental Retardation 

*515-3 Behavioral Applications to Medical Problems 

*574-3 Staff Training and Development 

*557-2 to 6 Self Regulation of Behavior 

563-3 Behavioral Analysis: Community Applications 

*564-3 School Related Behavior 

594b-3 Practicum in Behavior Analysis and Therapy 

THESIS OR RESEARCH PAPER 

M.A. Degree. This degree requires that one receive an S grade for 3-6 hours of 
REHAB 599. The thesis will be reviewed both prior to its initiation (as a prospec- 
tus) by a 2 member committee, and following its completion (in an oral defense) by 
a 3 member committee made up of a chair and at least 1 additional member. One 
other graduate faculty member, who may be from within the behavior analysis 
and therapy faculty, drawn from outside the faculty of the behavior analysis and 
therapy program, will serve as reader and attend the final review meeting. 

M.S. Degree. This degree requires that one receive a passing letter grade for 1-6 



Academic Programs Rehabilitation Institute / 193 

hours of REHAB 593. The research paper will be accomplished under the 
supervision of one of the faculty of the behavior analysis and therapy program. 

REHABILITATION ADMINISTRATION AND SERVICES 

Students receive their degrees in rehabilitation administration and services, but 

may elect to pursue concentrations in administration, services, or a double 

concentration. Students with less than 3 years of rehabilitation or related work 

experience are generally encouraged to pursue a services concentration or double 

concentration. All students must complete a minimum of 45 semester hours of 

graduate course work, which includes a full-time internship and a research 

project or thesis. During the first semester of full-time study or a comparable 

period for part-time students, the student must have a plan of study approved by 

an adviser and the degree program coordinator. This plan of study normally 

includes rehabilitation core, professional core, and elective course work, although 

specific plans may differ for students with varying backgrounds and career 

goals. The requirements are as follows: 

Rehabilitation Core (21 hours) 

REHB 400-3 Introduction to Rehabilitation 

REHB 513-4 Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Disability 

REHB 594 A-3 to 6 Practicum in Rehabilitation 

REHB 595-8 to 12 Internship in Rehabilitation 

REHB 593-3 Research in Rehabilitation 

or 

REHB 599-3 Thesis 

Professional Concentrations 

The student must complete a series of courses approved by the student's faculty 
adviser and degree program coordinator. This series of courses will normally 
consist of a 15-hour professional core and 9 hours of electives. Electives are chosen 
on the basis of their relevance to the declared professional concentration. 
Students taking double concentrations will normally take two 15-hour profes- 
sional cores and no electives. Persons graduating with concentrations in 
vocational evaluation or adjustment services are immediately eligible to sit for 
the CCWAVES examination. 

REHABILITATION ADMINISTRATION CORE 

570-3 Rehabilitation Administration 

573-3 Programming, Budgeting, and Community Resources 

576-3 Development and Supervision of Rehabilitation Employees 

578-3 Program Evaluation in Rehabilitation 

582-3 Seminar in Rehabilitation Services 

VOCATIONAL EVALUATION CORE 

431-3 Assessment Procedures in Rehabilitation 

436-3 Vocational Evaluation and Adjustment Services 

531-3 Individual Assessment Procedures in Rehabilitation 

533-3 Vocational Appraisal 

583-3 Seminar in Work Evaluation 

ADJUSTMENT SERVICES CORE 

406-3 Introduction to Behavior Analysis and Therapy 

436-3 Vocational Evaluation and Adjustment Services 

452-3 Behavior Change Applications 

523-3 Job Restructuring for the Handicapped 

525-3 Developing Job Readiness 



194 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 



JOB DEVELOPMENT AND PLACEMENT CORE 

421-3 Vocational Development and Placement 
525-3 Developing Job Readiness 
586-3 Seminar in Job Development 
BA450-3 Marketing Concepts 
BA543-3 Personnel Management 

Practicum and Internship Requirements 

Although students are usually required to complete at least 3 to 6 semester credit 
hours of practicum as well as a full-time internship, prior and concurrent work 
experience may be substituted for these requirements if recommended by the 
student's adviser and approved by the rehabilitation administration and services 
faculty. The options available to the student wishing to substitute work 
experience for either practicum or internship requirements are as follows. 

Option One. The student may request a waiver of the internship requirement 
and, if approved, substitute 3 semester credit hours of practicum and additional 
course work to bring the student's program up to the required 45 hour minimum. 

Option Two. Students with extensive previous work experience in the field of 
rehabilitation may request waivers of both the practicum and internship 
requirements. If the waiver is approved, they will enroll in 6 semester hours of 
REHAB 494, Work Experiences in Rehabilitation, and additional graduate 
course work up to the required 45 hour minimum. 

Waiver requests related to options one and two above must be submitted by the 
student through the faculty adviser to the coordinator of the rehabilitation 
administration and services program and must be approved by a vote of the 
rehabilitation administration and services faculty. Waiver requests must include 
written documentation of the reasons for the request and provide sufficient 
supporting evidence. Suggested guidelines for the appropriateness of each of the 
options are: 1) option one for the student with 3 or more years of satisfactory 
rehabilitation related work experience and 2) option two for the student with 3 or 
more years of satisfactory work experience directly related to the student's chosen 
professional course sequence. The student with minimal or no rehabilitation 
related work experience will be expected to complete the required 3 to 6 semester 
hours of practicum and a full-time internship. 

Research Paper/Project or Thesis and Comprehensive 

The student seeking the M.S. degree is required to complete a scholarly research 
paper or project in a rehabilitation related area and an oral or written 
comprehensive examination. The student seeking the M.A. degree is required to 
complete a graduate thesis in a rehabilitation related area and defend it before a 
thesis committee, an oral or written comprehensive examination, and in addition, 
an approved course in research statistics or research design. 

REHABILITATION COUNSELING 

The focus of the major in rehabilitation counseling is the training of competent 
professionals for the broad field of rehabilitation. The trained professional 
counselor must demonstrate competencies in establishing counseling relation- 
ships, case evaluation, assessment procedures, vocational placement, as well as 
have an awareness of professional and community resources that can be utilized 
in the rehabilitation process. Therefore, this master's level training program has 
3 goals: 

a. Preparation of professionals who can provide effective rehabilitation coun- 



Academic Programs Rehabilitation Institute / 195 

seling service to facilitate the person with a disability in their growth in personal, 
social, and vocational areas. 

b. Training individuals to maximize their professional skills through an 
integration of the theoretical and applied basics of rehabilitation. 

c. Preparation of professionals who can provide leadership in the application 
and delivery of rehabilitation services. 

This professional preparation program is based on nationally defined needs for 
rehabilitation counselor training and has been accredited by the Council on 
Rehabilitation Education. Upon completion of the program graduates are eligible 
to apply (via examination) for certification as rehabilitation counselors (C.R.C.). 

The overall objective of this program is to provide students with the opportu- 
nity for professional development with the skills and knowledge necessary to 
meet effectively the many challenges in rehabilitation. 

General Requirements 

To meet these goals, the rehabilitation counseling program requires a minimum 
of 45 semester hours of graduate work leading either to a M.A. or M.S. degree. The 
M.A. degree requires a formal thesis and oral examination, while the M.S. 
specifies a research paper, and the oral examination is optional. Both M.A. and 
M.S. degrees require the satisfactory passing of a comprehensive examination. 
Further, all students after completing the majority of their didactic and 
experiential course work are required to satisfactorily complete a 3 month full- 
time supervised counseling internship in an approved rehabilitation setting. 

Core Course Requirements 

While there is sufficient flexibility in the curriculum so that special interest can be 

pursued by students through field training assignments, seminars, and the 

internship assignment, the following core requirements must be met: 

REHB 400 Introduction to Rehabilitation 

REHB 421 Vocational Development and Placement 

REHB 431 Assessment Procedures in Rehabilitation 

REHB 451 General Rehabilitation Counseling 

REHB 501 Rehabilitation Foundations 

REHB 513 Medical and Psycho-Social Aspects of Disability 

REHB 594c Practicum in Rehabilitation 

REHB 595 Internship in Rehabilitation 

Students often specialize in working with particular disability groups, e.g., 
mentally retarded, emotionally disturbed, physically disabled, public offender, 
the elderly. 

ALCOHOL SPECIALIST CONCENTRATION 

The program in rehabilitation counseling includes the concentration of alcohol 
specialist. The objective is to prepare rehabilitation counselors who will have the 
knowledge and skills needed to serve the alcoholic populations and their families 
and other affected persons. 

The student in this concentration will meet all the requirements for the M.A. or 
M.S. degree in rehabilitation counseling. 

DOCTOR OF REHABILITATION 

The doctoral program in rehabilitation prepares students to function effectively 
as rehabilitation educators, researchers, or administrators. It does this by 
fostering the student's development and acquisition of relevant conceptual and 
experiential skills in evaluation and research methodologies, in rehabilitation 
service, or in the management of service units. 






196 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

Admission and Retention Standards 

All applicable policies and procedures of the Graduate School with regard to the 
admission of doctoral students will be followed. Requirements for admission to 
the doctoral program in rehabilitation exceed those of the Graduate School. The 
admissions committee of the doctoral program will review all candidates 
carefully for their special strengths. The following will be considered for all 
candidates. 

1 . High academic achievement (normally indicated by a grade point average of 
3.5 on a 4-point scale) in a master's program in rehabilitation or a closely 
related field at an accredited university. 

2. Knowledge of, and interest in conducting, rehabilitation research. 

3. Two years of successful performance equivalent to fulltime paid employment 
(post-baccalaureate) in a rehabilitation or related professional position. This 
may include an approved internship experience at the master's level. 

4. At least three letters of recommendation by professional persons who are 
familiar with the applicant's performance in academic, research, or service 
work settings. 

5. A personal or telephone interview with the Rh.D. program admissions 
committee. 

6. GRE scores dating back no farther than 5 years. 

Applicants will be considered for acceptance into the doctoral program at the 
beginning of either the fall or spring semester. For a student to be retained in the 
program, a 3.5 overall grade point average (GPA) must be maintained. Courses in 
which a grade below B is obtained will not be counted toward satisfying the hour 
requirements for the degree. 

Doctoral Committee 

The student shall select a chair who will serve as the major adviser. In 
consultation with the chair the student shall select a doctoral committee which is 
approved by the coordinator of doctoral studies and the Graduate School. At least 
one member shall be external to the Rehabilitation Institute. 

Working together with the chair, the student shall develop a plan of study, 
designating the courses to be completed. This plan shall be approved by the 
student's doctoral committee and by the coordinator of doctoral studies and then 
shall be made a matter of record. Further, the doctoral committee shall serve as 
the student's dissertation committee. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Admission to candidacy is granted by the dean of the Graduate School upon the 
recommendation of the faculty responsible for the student's program after the 
student has fulfilled the Graduate School residency requirement for the doctoral 
degree and passed the preliminary examinations. 

The written preliminary examinations are designed to assess the breadth and 
depth of the student's knowledge. They are prepared, administered, and evaluated 
by Rehabilitation Institute faculty committees appointed by the coordinator of 
doctoral studies. The preliminary examinations will ordinarily be taken in the 
spring of the second year of doctoral study. 

Dissertation 

After admission to candidacy, the student will prepare a dissertation based on 
original research conducted under the direct supervision of the dissertation chair 
and committee. The requirements of the Graduate School will govern the 
formation of the dissertation committee and the preparation and defense of the 
dissertation. While the dissertation is in preparation, the student will register for 
no fewer than 24 semester hours in REHAB 600, Dissertation. The dissertation 



Academic Programs Rehabilitation Institute / 197 

should conform to the current edition of the Publication Manual of the American 
Psychological Association and the standards required by the Graduate School. 

Degree Requirements 

The Doctor of Rehabilitation program emphasizes mastery of skills in research 
methodology, knowledge of human behaviors, and competencies in the areas of 
rehabilitation philosophy, policies, and practices. The course of study requires a 
minimum of 96 post-baccalaureate semester hours, 24 of which are dissertation 
hours and 34 of which fulfill the core area requirements below. 

Core Areas with Required Minimum Hours 

Asterisked courses are required unless waived by the Rh.D. program require- 
ments committee. 

RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND UTILIZATION (MINIMUM 17 HOURS) 

EPSY *506-4 Inferential Statistics 

EPSY *507-4 Multiple Regression 

REHB *509a-3 Single Subject Experimental Designs 

REHB *509b-3 Group Experimental Designs 

REHB *588-3 Seminar in Research in Rehabilitation 

REHB 504-3 Foundations of Rehabilitation Research 

SEMINAR ON PROFESSIONAL ISSUES AND METHODS IN REHABILITATION (MINIMUM 12 HOURS) 

REHB 573-3 Programming, Budgeting, and Community Resources 

REHB 574-3 Staff Training and Development 

REHB 578-3 Program Evaluation in Rehabilitation 

REHB *581-3 Legal and Ethical Issues 

REHB 587-3 Seminar in Correlates of Disability 

REHB *589-3 Professional Seminar in Rehabilitation 

The student's preparation at the master's level will be evaluated and up to 30 
hours of didactic course work may be accepted toward the completion of the 96 
hour minimum requirement for the doctorate. Master's level didactic courses in 
rehabilitation counseling, rehabilitation services, rehabilitation administration, 
and applied behavior analysis and therapy will usually be acceptable. Course 
work in related areas such as counseling, psychology, and social work may 
qualify. 

The goal of the program is to develop high quality professionals. Thus, the 
student must demonstrate competence in the areas of rehabilitation services 
offered by the Rehabilitation Institute. This is accomplished through the 
student's master's degree program, previous work experience, the doctoral core 
requirements, supervised professional experiences, and electives. Rh.D. degree 
graduates should be well prepared for leadership roles in the areas of rehabilita- 
tion administration, service, education, or research. 

Social Work 

The School of Social Work offers graduate work leading to the Master of Social 
Work degree. Candidacy status for accreditation review by the Council of Social 
Work Education was granted July 25, 1985. 

Master of Social Work 

The Master of Social Work degree program offers preparation for professional 
social work practice. The organizing principle of the M.S.W. program is the 
improvement of the quality of individual life through the enhancement of social 
and economic justice and opportunity. Upon completion of the MSW program, the 



198 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 • 

student will acquire knowledge, values, and skills consonant with the social work 
profession and be capable ultimately of engaging in autonomous social work 
practice. Graduates with such preparation will be able to effectively deliver the 
social services needed to meet human needs in both urban and rural areas. 

Students in the first year take foundation curriculum. The second year of study 
provides an opportunity for focused study at an advanced level in either 
health/mental health or child welfare. The school also offers course work in 
preparation for school social work certification by the Illinois State Board of 
Education. The first year foundation curriculum consists of 30 credit hours and 
includes the following courses. 

FALL (15 CREDIT HOURS) 

SW 500-3 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I 
SW 504-2 Ethnic Diversity and Social Work Practices 
SW 505-3 Foundations of Social Work and Service 
SW 510-3 Social Work Practice I 
SW 541-4 Social Work Practicum I 

SPRING (15 CREDIT HOURS) 

SW 501-3 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II 
SW 506-2 Social Welfare Policy Analysis and Design 
SW 511-3 Social Work Research 
SW 520-3 Social Work Practice II 
SW 542-4 Social Work Practicum II 

In each year of study, in addition to classroom work, students are required to 
take field practicum. Applied learning through field practice is an integral 
component of social work education. Field instruction provides the student with 
opportunity for applying social work theory and conceptual learning to realistic 
and practical situations. Students may not substitute current or past, paid or 
volunteer, social work experience for field practicum requirements of the M.S.W. 
program. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants may be considered for the regular two year program if they hold a 
bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university with an overall grade 
point average of at least 2.7 on a 4.0 scale and a grade point average of at least 3.0 
in the last 2 years of academic course work, excluding field practicum and 
experiential classes. In addition it is expected that applicants will have a broad 
liberal arts base with a substantial preparation in the social and behavioral 
sciences, human biology, and in the humanities. 

Applicants who wish to be considered for advanced standing must meet all 
criteria noted above, with the addition of a bachelor's degree in social work from 
an accredited program. 

Applicants admitted for either the basic two-year program or for advanced 
standing may be required to take additional courses as a condition of admission. 

A reduced-load program is available for a limited number of students with or 
without a B.S. degree in social work, who are either fully employed or prefer to 
take fewer than 3 courses per semester. This program requires a minimum of 2 
consecutive semesters of full-time residency as defined by the University (e.g., 
fall-spring, spring-summer, or summer-fall). Entry is in the fall semester for 
students without a B.S. degree in social work and in the summer for students with 
a B.S. degree in social work from an accredited program. 

Requests to change from full-time to full-time reduced-load status requires prior 
approval of the director. 

Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are required. Documented potential 



Academic Programs Social Work / 199 

for the profession of social work is considered a part of the admission criteria 
which may also include an interview prior to acceptance. 

Each application will be individually reviewed; however, meeting all stated 
criteria will not automatically guarantee admission to the school. 

The deadline for applications is March 1st for both summer term (advanced 
standing admission) and fall (regular admission) semester. 

Applicants must apply to both the Graduate School and the School of Social 
Work. 

Degree Requirements 

Students admitted to the basic two-year program are required to complete the first 
year foundation curriculum and the second year advanced curriculum. They are 
required to complete a minimum of 60 semester hours of graduate course work. 

Students with a bachelor's degree in social work from an accredited program 
may be admitted with advanced standing. These students are required to 
complete 9 semester hours of transition courses and a minimum of 30 semester 
hours of the second year graduate course curriculum. 

Within limits imposed by the policies of the Graduate School of the University, 
transfer credits will be permitted for up to 15 semester hours for applicants who 
wish to transfer from another graduate program in social work. 

Candidates must maintain a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. They must also successfully 
complete a substantive research paper and demonstrate through oral examina- 
tion the interrelatedness of their product to social work practice and to social 
policy issues in the field of social welfare. 

Student Advisement 

Upon admission to the Master of Social Work degree program, the student will be 
assigned a faculty adviser. The adviser is responsible for supervision of the 
student's progress and is available for career counseling as well as assisting in 
other matters which might arise in connection with the student's work. 

Financial Aid 

The program offers limited financial assistance through graduate assistantships. 
Other scholarships, grants-in-aid, etc., may be applied for through the Graduate 
School, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 



Sociology 



The Department of Sociology offers graduate work leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. 
degrees. The M.A. degree program provides students with the opportunity to 
acquire a general knowledge of sociology through courses and seminars which 
illustrate a variety of approaches characterizing the discipline. The Ph.D. degree 
program is centered around advanced offerings in the areas of theory- 
methodology, deviance, family, social stratification, and social change. The fac- 
ulty of the department is research-oriented and supports such an orientation on 
the part of its students. The department maintains a small library and computer 
facility. 

Admission to Graduate Study in Sociology 

The department requires an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 for admission to the M.A. 
degree program and a graduate GPA of 3.5 for admission to the Ph.D. degree pro- 
gram. Reference letters and transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate aca- 
demic grades must be submitted to the department for review by the graduate ad- 
missions committee. Scores from the Graduate Record Examination are welcome. 
International students must achieve 550 or better on TOEFL scores. Persons 



200 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

seeking more information should write: Director of Graduate Studies, Department 
of Sociology, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 

Graduate Assistantships and Fellowships 

Assistantships for qualified students are available through the department on a . 
competitive basis. Upon nomination by the University's academic departments, 
the Graduate School awards various fellowships in University-wide competition. 
Students funded through the department are required to enroll in 3 courses each 
semester, taking no more than 1 audit and 1 individual readings course each 
academic year. Funding is limited to 4 semesters for M.A. degree students and 8 
semesters for Ph.D. degree students. 

Master of Arts Degree 

The Master of Arts degree in sociology requires a minimum of 32 semester hours 
of course work and a research paper. The specific course requirements are SOC 
501, Classical Sociological Theory; SOC 512, Sociological Research; SOC 526a, 
Quantitative Methods in Sociology; 3 research seminars in sociology; 1 additional 
400 or 500 level course in sociology; 1 additional 400 or 500 level course in 
sociology; and 4 credit hours in SOC 591, Individual Research (for completion of 
the master's degree research paper). The director of graduate studies serves as 
academic adviser for all M.A. degree students. 

Master's Research Paper. The research paper is developed from a seminar paper 
produced in a 500-level sociology course. Students wishing to do a master's 
research paper on a topic not covered under the seminar offerings can petition the 
department's graduate studies committee for an exception to this rule. The faculty 
member in charge of the seminar will also serve as the adviser for the master's 
research paper. Students will enroll with this faculty member for 4 credit hours in 
SOC 591, Individual Research, for the completion of the research paper. This 
course can be taken concurrently with or subsequently to the research seminar. 
The research paper will then be submitted for evaluation to another faculty 
member appointed by the director of graduate studies, in concurrence with the 
faculty adviser for the paper. The master's research paper normally is 20 to 40 
pages in length and uses the standard ASA reference style. In addition to the copy 
required by the Graduate School, 1 suitably bound copy must be deposited in the 
department library. 

Early Admission to the Ph.D. Degree Program. Upon completion of 2 semesters 
of full-time study, a student may petition to waive the M.A. degree and be 
admitted to the Ph.D. degree program in sociology, if the following conditions 
have been met: 1) minimum GPA of 3.7 during the first year of study; and 2) 
departmental approval of a research paper completed during the first year of 
study. The procedure and standards for approval of the paper are the same as 
with the regular master's research paper. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

Advisement. The responsibility for initial advisement rests with the director of 
graduate studies. As soon as a tentative general plan of study has been worked 
out, the director of graduate studies, in consultation with the student, will request 
an appropriate member of the graduate faculty of the department to serve as the 
student's individual academic adviser. 

It is the student's responsibility to develop, in consultation with the adviser, a 
plan of study designating the primary and secondary areas of examination. At 
this point, the student expresses a preference for a program committee of 3 or 4 
members representing the chosen areas of examination. After consultation with 
the appropriate faculty the director of graduate studies appoints the student's pro- 



Academic Programs Sociology / 201 

gram committee and enters the membership of the committee in the student's 
records, along with the declared primary and secondary areas of examination. 

Research Tool Requirement. Doctoral students must complete the following 
courses: SOC 501, 502, 512, and 526a,b, or furnish proof of equivalent work at the 
M.A. degree level. The director of graduate studies will determine questions of 
equivalencies. In addition to these courses students must develop research skills 
that are appropriate and necessary for their dissertation research. It is the 
responsibility of the student's program adviser to supervise the student's 
development of these research skills. 

Areas for Comprehensive Examination. All students must declare 2 primary 
areas for the comprehensive examination (one of which must be sociological 
theory-methodology) and 2 secondary areas of examination. At present the 
department regularly offers lecture courses and seminars in the following 
primary areas of examination: theory-methodology, deviance, sociology of the 
family, social stratification, and social change. For their secondary areas of 
examinations, students may select from those areas just listed, or from the 
following: gender, demography, education, formal organizations, political sociol- 
ogy, medical sociology, social psychology, and quantitative methods. 

Other areas of examination may be offered in particular cases as student needs 
arise and faculty resources permit. Approval of a special area of examination 
must be obtained from the graduate studies committee at least 1 semester before 
the intended date of examination. 

One secondary area may be chosen in a department other than sociology. The 
student shall in this case meet the requirements for a Ph.D. secondary field in the 
department concerned. Relevance of the outside area to the student's total pro- 
gram must be demonstrated, and approval must be obtained from the graduate 
studies committee. 

Course Work and Readings. In addition to the regularly offered courses and 
seminars the department provides supervised readings and research courses, 
depending upon the availability of faculty members. Supervised readings and 
research courses are not to be taken as substitutes for regularly scheduled courses 
and seminars, and registration in them requires prior approval by the student's 
adviser. 

Preparation of a Readings List. Students are expected to prepare themselves for 
comprehensive examinations through course work and reading. Students must 
develop, with the assistance of their program committees, a readings list covering 
the students' examination areas. This readings list must include major works in 
each of the examination areas. It must also include the most recent works 
pertinent to the students' anticipated dissertation research. The readings list as a 
whole must be prefaced by a statement of purpose providing a rationale for the 
selected titles. The final list must be approved, in formal session, by the students' 
program committee, no later than the end of the students' third semester in 
residence. 

Comprehensive Examinations. To qualify for the status of candidate for the 
Ph.D. degree, the student must pass written comprehensive examinations. 
Examinations are based on the final readings list as approved by the student's 
program committee. The comprehensive examinations consist of a six-hour exam 
in each of the 2 primary areas and 3 hours in each of the 2 secondary areas. 

The examinations are prepared, administered, and evaluated by the student's 
program committee, supplemented by other members of the graduate faculty, in 
order to provide at least 2 readers in each of the major and minor areas. The chair 



202 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

of the program committee also serves as chair of the examination committee. 
Supplementary members of the examination committee are, upon the recom- 
mendation of the program committee's chair, appointed by the director of 
graduate studies. 

The comprehensive examinations must be taken during the full-time student's 
fifth semester in the program. The student may take all exams in either the fourth 
or the twelfth week of the semester, or opt to take theory-methodology and 1 minor 
exam at the early date, and the rest at the later date. It is the responsibility of the 
chair of the examination committee, and of the director of graduate studies, to 
ensure that the examinations are properly prepared, scheduled, administered, 
and monitored. 

Examination results are reported to the director of graduate studies by the chair 
of the student's examination committee within 2 weeks from the date of the 
examination, and the director of graduate studies notifies the student of the 
results. A failed examination in any area must be retaken on the next scheduled 
date. If an area exam is failed a second time, the graduate studies committee must 
be petitioned for the privilege of a final retake. The written petition must include 
the student's diagnosis of the reasons for the failure, and a detailed plan for 
remedial work. The recommendation of the graduate studies committee is 
forwarded to the department chair, who has the final decision on the matter. A 
student is entitled to a combined total of no more than 3 retakes. 

On successful completion of the comprehensive examinations, and upon the 
recommendation of the director of graduate studies to the dean of the Graduate 
School, the student attains the status of candidate for the Ph.D. degree. 

Dissertation. The dissertation is the single most important requirement for the 
Ph.D. degree, and the student should start thinking about potential dissertation 
topics soon after admission. Information concerning Graduate School require- 
ments regarding the dissertation is contained in the Graduate Catalog. 

After completion of the comprehensive examinations the student selects a 
dissertation director who must be approved by the department chair and the dean 
of the Graduate School. In consultation with the dissertation director, the student 
prepares a detailed dissertation prospectus, showing clearly the purpose and 
scope of the research, its relation to the previous work in the field, its theoretical 
relevance and significance, and the research methods and techniques to be used. 
The prospectus must contain a section documenting the student's training and 
abilities in using the proposed research methods and techniques. When the 
prospectus is ready for presentation, the department chair appoints a dissertation 
committee with the student's dissertation director serving as chair. The disserta- 
tion committee shall consist of 5 members, including one from outside the 
Department of Sociology. 

The prospectus must be approved by the dissertation committee in formal 
session and filed with the graduate program secretary. A prospectus must be 
approved no later than the end of the student's sixth semester in the program. 

The completed dissertation must be acceptable to the chair of the dissertation 
committee before being circulated among the committee members for evaluation. 

Dissertation Defense. After acceptance of the dissertation by the candidate's 
dissertation committee, an oral examination will be conducted by the committee 
in open meeting, as specified by Graduate School regulations. This examination 
will be based upon the contents and implications of the dissertation. The exami- 
nation may not be scheduled sooner than 4 weeks after the completed dissertation 
has been distributed to the dissertation committee. A public announcement and a 
copy of the dissertation shall be made available to other faculty of the department 
at least one week before the examination. Upon satisfactory completion of the 
oral examination, the student must submit 2 copies of the dissertation to the 



Academic Programs Sociology / 203 

Graduate School and another copy, suitably bound, must be deposited in the 
department library. 

Expected Progress Through the Ph.D. Degree Program. 

Semesters 1 and 2: Course work: Minimum grade point average of 3.5; at least 

four 500-level sociology courses to be taken during the 2 semesters. 

Semester 3: Course work and approved reading lists by the end of the third 

semester. 

Semester 4: Course work and intensive preparation for comprehensive 

examinations. 

Semester 5: Comprehensive examinations. 

Semester 6: Approved prospectus by the end of the sixth semester. 

Semester 7: Dissertation. 

Semester 8: Dissertation. 

Sociology as a Secondary Emphasis in Another Ph.D. Degree Program. A stu- 
dent who is enrolled in another Ph.D. degree program and who wishes to declare 
sociology as a secondary area must submit to the director of graduate studies a 
written request which includes the following: a plan of course work, a personal 
reading list, and an overall program statement indicating the relationship of the 
area in sociology to the student's total program. The student will be expected to 
take a comprehensive examination in the sociology area. 

Interdisciplinary Ph.D. Degree Program in Sociology. Students who have been 
admitted to the Ph.D. degree program in sociology, and who wish to develop an 
interdisciplinary program, should review the guidelines set forth by the Graduate 
School. The graduate dean approves interdisciplinary Ph.D. degree programs 
only when they bear the endorsement of a department that offers a Ph.D. degree 
program. A student who wishes to apply for an interdisciplinary program in 
which sociology will be the sponsoring department should understand that the 
program of study must include substantial involvement in sociology courses and 
seminars, and that the department may require the student to meet other require- 
ments similar to those established for the Ph.D. degree program in sociology. 



Special Education 



The department offers programs leading to the Master of Science in Education 
degree with a major in special education and to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in 
education with a concentration in special education. 

Master of Science in Education degree 

In the master's degree program, which requires a minimum of 30 semester hours 
for completion, 6 emphases are offered. All are designed primarily for those who 
are already certified to teach, and who have attained an undergraduate grade 
point average of at least 2.7 on a 4 point scale. Some of the emphases require prior 
certification in one area of special education as well. Students desiring entry into 
the program but lacking appropriate certification may complete the necessary 
requirements in conjunction with their program. Such students will be advised on 
certification requirements in the Office of Teacher Education. Applicants with 
grade point averages less than 2.7 may at the discretion of the departmental 
faculty be admitted conditionally. They may also be required to complete all or a 
part of the Graduate Record Examination and to submit the results as a part of 
their application to the department. 

There are 6 emphases open to those seeking a master's degree in special 
education: (1) coordinator of classes for the preschool handicapped, (2) resource 



204 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

teacher of the mildly handicapped, (3) teacher of the moderately and severely 
handicapped, (4) teacher of the severely behavior disordered, (5) teacher of the 
secondary aged mildly handicapped, (6) special education supervisor. Program 
requirements for each of these emphases include the following courses: SPE 
500-3, 578-3, 580-3, and 599-3 to 6. In addition, they require completion of the 
courses specified in the explanation of each of the 6 areas of emphasis. 

Coordinator of Classes for the Pre-School Handicapped. Those selecting this 
emphasis will, as a rule, have completed certification requirements in at least one 
other area of special education, and during the program will complete require- 
ments for approval in the pre-school handicapped area. Upon completion of the 
program, they will be prepared to work either as classroom teachers or as pro- 
gram coordinators in this area. In addition to the core courses, they must 
complete: SPE 505-3, 512-3, at least one of 513-3, 514-3, or 515-2, and additional 
electives selected in cooperation with the graduate adviser. 

Resource Teacher of the Mildly Handicapped. Students choosing this emphasis 
will ordinarily enter the program with certification in at least one area of special 
education and during the program will find another area of special education 
certification. Their training will prepare them to work as resource personnel in 
school programs where mildly handicapped children have been returned to 
regular classes. In addition to the core courses, they must complete: one of SPE 
401-3, or 404-3; 511-3; at least one of 513-3, 514-3, or 515-2; and additional electives 
selected in cooperation with their graduate adviser to a total of at least 30 
semester hours. 

Teacher of the Moderately and Severely Handicapped. Students choosing this 
emphasis will ordinarily have been certified in the area of trainable-severely/ 
profoundly handicapped or behavior disorders, and during their master's degree 
program will be pursuing an advanced degree of knowledge and expertise. 
However, persons without a teaching certification are also admitted to this degree 
program but must complete all course deficiencies. The major objective of this 
program is to prepare educators to apply systematic instruction technology to the 
learning and behavioral problems of moderately and severely handicapped 
persons so that they might function as fully as possible in community life. After 
completion of this program, graduates will be prepared to directly teach or 
supervise educational efforts in school, community, domestic, and vocational 
settings. Program applicants may declare an emphasis in severe behavior 
disorders or moderate/severe/profound mental retardation. In addition to the 
core course requirements, students must complete characteristics and methods 
deficiencys, SPE 550-3, and additional electives selected in cooperation with their 
graduate adviser. For a student choosing a joint emphasis in mental retardation 
and behavior disorders, specific departmental and nondepartmental electives 
may be designed from which the student must choose. 

Teacher of the Severely Behavior Disordered. Students choosing this emphasis 
will ordinarily have been certified in the area of behavior disorders, and during 
their master's degree program will be pursuing an advanced level of knowledge 
and expertise. Persons without a teaching certificate are also admitted to this 
degree program, but must complete all course deficiencies. The major objective of 
this program is to prepare educators to apply systematic instruction technology 
to the learning and behavioral problems of severely handicapped persons so that 
they might function as fully as possible in community life. After completion of 
this program, graduates will be prepared to directly teach or supervise educational 
efforts in school, community, domestic, and vocational settings. 

In addition to the core course requirement, students must complete characteris- 



Academic Programs Special Education / 205 

tics and methods deficiencies, SPE 501-3; 550-3; and additional electives selected in 
cooperation with their graduate adviser. For a student choosing a joint emphasis 
in mental retardation and behavior disorders, specific departmental and nonde- 
partmental electives may be designated from which the student must choose. 

Teacher of Secondary Aged Mildly Handicapped. Teachers with this emphasis 
will be expected to have a bachelor's degree in special education. At the 
conclusion of this program the students will be qualified to teach secondary aged 
mildly handicapped youths in a variety of public and private school settings. In 
addition to the core courses, the students must complete: SPE 516-3, 519-3, and 
EPSY 402-3, and at least 9 hours from either vocational education studies, 
administration of justice, Rehabilitation Institute, or some combination of the 
above. The students' academic programs are planned in consultation with their 
adviser on the basis of interest and experiences. 

Special Education Supervisor. Students choosing this emphasis will enter the 
program with certification in at least one area of special education and a 
minimum of 2 years teaching experience in their area of certification. Upon 
successful completion of the program, the students will be eligible for supervisory 
certification in the special education area of teaching experience. The program 
has as its purpose the training of effective instructional leaders. In addition to the 
core courses, they must complete: EAHE 501-3, 503-3, 517-3 or 519-3, 511-3 or C&I 
531-3 or C&I 571-3, SPE 513-3, 514-3, and additional electives selected in 
cooperation with their graduate adviser to a total of at least 32 semester hours. 
Research requirements for the master's program are as follows: 

1. The student must successfully complete SPE 500-3, and then SPE 599-2 to 6 
during which the thesis is completed. 

2. The student must successfully defend the thesis in an oral examination con- 
ducted by the student's committee chair and 2 additional committee 
members. 

A comprehensive examination over the field of special education is also 
required and conducted by the student's committee chair and 2 additional 
committee members. 

All full-time graduate students in the department may be required to work a 
maximum of 5 hours per week in departmental activities as a part of their 
professional development. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Education 

The Department of Special Education participates in the doctoral program in 
education with a concentration in special education. Inquiries regarding applica- 
tion should be directed to the chair of the department. See the description of the 
Ph.D. degree in education. 

Speech Communication 

At a time when many speech communication departments are staffed by 
individuals representing the same school of thought, our department has a 
healthy diversity of outlooks and approaches. Nevertheless our diversity has not 
prevented the development of an exceptionally supportive interpersonal climate. 
While we argue about a great many issues, we are committed as colleagues to 
effective teaching and productive scholarship. We believe that our students share 
these commitments, and we are most anxious to recruit students who want to 
study in such an environment. 

Our facilities include a superior laboratory for oral performance studies, the 
Calipre stage, computer terminal laboratory room, video tape laboratory, library, 



206 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

and research carrels all housed in the department. We offer graduate assistants 
the opportunity for independent teaching experiences as well as the usual support 
duties as teaching and research assistants. All graduate students are eligible for 
training experiences through internships in business, governmental, and political 
organizations. 

Financial Assistance 

There are several forms of financial assistance available to graduate students in 
the Department of Speech Communication. First, there are graduate fellowships 
awarded on the basis of superior scholarship, which do not require any 
departmental service. Second, there are several special fellowships offered 
annually to students who show promise of success in graduate studies even 
though their academic records have been only average because of economic or 
social disadvantages. These special fellowships have no service requirements. 
Third, there are graduate assistantships available which require up to 20 hours 
per week of service in teaching or research. Finally, there are dissertation 
research awards for students in their final year of work toward the Ph.D. degree. 

The stipends for the above awards currently range from $5976 to $6372 for the 9 
month academic year depending on the level of graduate study of the appointee 
and the type of appointment. These rates may be increased for the forthcoming 
year. All the appointments, fellowships, and assistantships, also include a waiver 
of tuition (both in-state and out-of-state) for the student, although the student is 
responsible for student fees. Students who hold assistantship appointments for 2 
consecutive semesters also receive a tuition waiver for the following summer 
session, and a limited number of appointments pay stipends for summer 
assignments as well. 

Applications for financial assistance may be obtained by writing: Director of 
Graduate Studies, Department of Speech Communication, Southern Illinois Uni- 
versity at Carbondale, Carbondale, Illinois 62901. Completed applications for 
fellowships should be received by February 1 for appointment during the 
subsequent fall semester. Applications for fall semester assistantships should be 
received by March 1 . 

The Department of Speech Communication offers 3 graduate programs of in- 
struction and research in the discipline of human communication leading respec- 
tively to the Master of Arts, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Curriculum. The graduate faculty of the department offers curriculum areas in 
communication education, interpersonal communication, philosophy of commu- 
nication, performance studies, and (at the doctoral level) theater as well as course 
work in intercultural communication (including semiotics), organizational com- 
munication and public relations, political communication, and rhetoric and 
public address. 

Admissions. Applicants must meet the minimum requirements of the Graduate 
School and should have completed a minimum of 24 quarter or 16 semester credit 
hours in speech or related subjects. A program for remedying deficiencies in 
background can be arranged upon petition to the graduate committee of the 
Department of Speech Communication. In some instances applicants will be 
accepted for direct entry from the baccalaureate to the doctoral program when the 
graduate committee identifies high achievement and potential in the applicant's 
undergraduate work. Master's degree students seeking the Ph.D. degree should 
make application when they are within 16 hours of completing the degree. 

Application for admission to graduate studies in speech communication should 
be directed to the director of graduate studies of the Department of Speech 
Communication. The GRE Aptitude Test is not required as a condition for 
admission but is strongly recommended. In some cases it may be requested to 



Academic Programs Speech Communication / 207 

support application materials. Except for persons from English-speaking coun- 
tries, international students are required by the department to have a TOEFL 
score of 600 or higher for admission. In addition to materials sent to the Graduate 
School, each applicant should submit to the Department of Speech Communica- 
tion three recommendations from former instructors and an application form 
indicating professional and personal objectives. In addition, applicants for the 
Ph.D. degree program may be requested to furnish a thesis or research paper as 
evidence of research and writing ability. 

Acceptance for graduate study in speech communication and subsequent 
continuation in the graduate program is determined by the graduate committee of 
the Department of Speech Communication. Students who are awarded graduate 
assistantships to provide assistance in the instruction of the department are 
required to take SPCH 539 if they have not had previous teaching experience at 
the secondary, college, or university level; the course is strongly recommended for 
all students planning careers in university teaching. 

Research Style. In most cases graduate students are required to write a term 
research paper for each course taken; and, depending on the degree program, each 
student is required to write a research report, thesis, or dissertation. In all cases 
the writing must conform to the latest edition of The ML A Style Manual or the 
APA Publication Manual, depending on the nature of the research. In all cases 
the writing must conform to the current edition of the Graduate School Guidelines 
for the Preparation of Research Reports, Theses, and Dissertations. 

Master's Degree Programs 

A minimum of 30 semester credit hours is required for the M.A. or M.S. degree. At 
least 15 of these hours must be at the 500 level. A student who completes only the 
minimum of 30 hours of work may devote no more than 9 hours to work outside 
the Department of Speech Communication. However, a student may petition the 
graduate committee for a program to include 15 hours outside the department. 
Such outside work must be germane to one of the departmental curriculum areas 
for purposes of research and examination. Competence in one foreign language is 
required for the M.A. degree. Competence may be demonstrated by (1) E.T.S. 
examination, (2) achieving a grade of B or A in FR 488, GER 488, RUSS 488, or 
SPAN 488, or (3) achieving a passing grade in other approved foreign language 
courses on campus, a list of which is available in the department office. Current 
standards for passing the E.T.S. examination in French, German, Russian, or 
Spanish are available from the director of graduate studies. 

A faculty adviser is named for the individual student before the end of the first 
semester. The faculty adviser and the student will plan the program of study. The 
program must consist of course work in at least 3 curriculum areas. In order to 
satisfy a given area of study, a student must complete at least 6 semester hours of 
work in that area. A course used for one curriculum area may not be counted 
toward another area. A comprehensive written examination is taken during the 
last semester of study. 

The requirements for the master's degree may be met by either of the following 
plans chosen by the student in consultation with the adviser. 

Plan 1: Thesis. Each student must complete a minimum of 30 semester credit 
hours, with no more than 6 hours or fewer than 3 hours of thesis credit in SPCH 
599 counted toward the 30 hour minimum. In addition, the student must register 
for at least one semester hour of credit in SPCH 599 during any academic term in 
which the services of any faculty member are utilized in the supervision of or 
consultation concerning the thesis. If the student's reliance upon faculty assis- 
tance justifies, the director may require an appropriately greater number of credit 
hours in SPCH 599. The thesis is submitted to a committee of 3 members of the 



208 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2\ 

graduate faculty, at least 2 of whom must be from the Department of Speech* 
Communication. The committee must approve the prospectus and will administer 
an oral examination over the thesis. Students are required to submit 2 copies of i 
the thesis to the Graduate School, one copy to the Department of Speech; 
Communication, and one copy to the thesis director. 

Plan 2: Research Report. Each student must complete a minimum of 30 semester j 
credit hours, with no more than 3 hours or fewer than 1 hour of research report* 
credit in SPCH 595 counted toward the 30 hours minimum. A research report isi 
submitted as evidence of research competence. This paper should be based on a\ 
special project or specific courses as recommended by an advisory committee 1 
composed of the student's adviser and one other member of the graduate faculty 
in the Department of Speech Communication selected by the student and the 
adviser. This advisory committee must approve the research paper before it is! 
submitted to the graduate committee and, then, to the Graduate School. One copy 
of the research report is submitted to the Graduate School, one copy to the 
Department of Speech Communication, and one copy to the adviser. 

The subject of the thesis or research report must be in one of the curriculum 
areas chosen by the student. A student must have a graduate grade point average 
of 3.25 in order to be eligible for the master's degree. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

A minimum of 42 semester credit hours of course work plus 9 hours of 
methodology (tool) courses beyond the master's degree and 24 semester credit 
hours of dissertation work are required for the Ph.D. degree. Course work outside 
the department must be germane to one of the departmental curriculum areas for 
purposes of examination and dissertation research. Throughout the program of 
study, the student must maintain a 3.25 grade point average in all work taken. If 
the grade point average drops below the minimum, the student is placed on 
academic warning for the following two semesters. 

During the last half of the second semester of course work, the student's progress 
shall be reviewed by the advisory committee to determine continuation, change, 
or termination of the program. The advisory committee for each student shall be re- 
sponsible for assembling the necessary information (grades, recommendations, 
progress in curriculum areas, etc.) for consideration in reaching the above decision. 

Advisory Committee. A 3 person advisory committee shall be established during 
the first semester of graduate study to plan the program of study with each student. 
The chair of the committee shall act as the primary adviser and sign the graduate 
course request form. This advisory committee is responsible for certifying to the 
graduate committee that the student has met all departmental requirements for 
admission to candidacy and has passed the Ph.D. preliminary examination. 

The advisory committee and the student will plan the program of study. The 
program of study focuses on at least one curriculum area. All students are 
required to take SPCH 501, Introduction to Speech Communication Research and 
SPCH 510, Rhetoric and Communication. Also students must take a minimum of 
9 hours of methodology courses prescribed by the chosen curriculum area. 
Students selecting theater as a curriculum area must take 18 hours of speech 
communication courses including SPCH 501 and 510. 

Attendance is required at proseminars as part of professional development. 
Graduate students are encouraged to present their scholarly work. 

Preliminary Examination. The student must pass a preliminary examination on 
each of the declared curriculum areas in the program of study. The preparation 
and administration of the examination are determined by the advisory committee 
in consultation with the student. The examination is taken near the end of the 
course work. 



Academic Programs Speech Communication / 209 



Dissertation. Each student must register for at least 24 semester hours of 
dissertation credit in SPCH 600 or SPCH 601 or THE A 600 or THE A 601. In 
addition, the student must register for at least one semester hour of credit in 
SPCH 600 or THEA 600 during any academic term in which the services of any 
faculty member are utilized in the supervision of or consultation concerning the 
dissertation. If the students' reliance upon faculty assistance justifies, they may 
be required by the dissertation adviser to register for an appropriately greater 
number of credit hours. 

The dissertation director shall, upon consultation with the student, be responsi- 
ble for setting up a dissertation committee, supervising the dissertation, and 
administering the final oral examination. The dissertation committee shall 
approve the dissertation prospectus and pass upon the completed dissertation 
and oral examination. Students are required to submit two copies of the 
dissertation to the Graduate School, one copy to the Department of Speech 
Communication, and one copy to the dissertation director. 

Interdisciplinary Program. Students who have been admitted to the doctoral 
program in speech communication and who wish to develop an interdisciplinary 
program, should review the guidelines set forth by the Graduate School. The 
graduate dean approves interdisciplinary Ph.D. programs only when they bear 
the endorsement of the principal sponsoring department. A student who wishes 
to apply for an interdisciplinary program in which speech communication will be 
the principal sponsoring department should understand that the program of 
study must include substantial involvement with courses in speech communica- 
tion and that the department may require the student to meet other requirements 
similar to those established for the doctoral program in speech communication. 



Telecommunications 

The Master of Arts degree in telecommunications provides advanced professional 
training for students preparing for leadership positions in radio and television 
broadcasting, cable television, corporate video, and related fields. Content areas 
include the structure and organization of broadcast-related industries, mass 
media theories, economic and management perspectives, emerging new tech- 
nologies, policy and regulatory issues, content criticism and review, program- 
ming innovations, international perspectives, and societal effects. Graduates of 
the program advance to leadership positions in broadcast stations, cable 
systems, production houses, corporate and public sector video departments, or 
teach in colleges and universities. 

Admission 

A baccalaureate degree is required from an accredited university for admission to 
the M.A. degree in telecommunications with preference given to those who have 
studied radio- television. For students coming from non-radio/TV backgrounds or 
whose preparation is lacking in certain areas, additional undergraduate course 
work may be required by the graduate faculty. Courses taken to satisfy 
deficiencies will not be counted towards the M.A. degree. Applicants must submit 
an application form obtained from the department, transcripts of all under- 
graduate work, evidence of scholarship such as a research paper, and evidence of 
proficiency in a foreign language or computer programming. In addition, all 
applicants must fulfill the requirements for admission to the Graduate School. 

Requirements 

A minimum of 30 graduate credit hours is required for the M.A. degree in 



210 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

telecommunications. Of these, 6 hours must be taken in an outside department 
but related to the student's program and approved by the student's adviser. For 
example, courses in business administration may be chosen by students focusing 
their studies in the area of management. A minimum of 18 hours must be 
successfully completed at the 500 level or above. All students in the program are 
required to successfully complete R-T 500 Introduction to Research in Telecommu- 
nications, R-T 532 Telecommunications Research, R-T 573 Telecommunications 
Management, R-T 580 Telecommunications Technology. Students are also 
required to complete selected other 500 level courses in their major. 

As a part of the 30 hours required for graduation, each student must select one 
of two options: 
Plan 1. Thesis. Each student must complete a minimum of 30 semester credit 
hours including a traditional written thesis (R-T 599, Thesis) which counts 3 
to 6 hours in the program. An oral examination by the faculty advisory 
committee is given upon completion of the thesis. 
Plan 2. Research report. Each student must complete a minimum of 30 semester 
hours including an individual research report (R-T 591, Individual Study in 
Telecommunications) which counts 3 hours in the program. A research 
report is required which should be based upon supervised research or an 
independent investigative project approved by the student's advisory com- 
mittee. An oral examination by the faculty advisory committee is given the 
student upon completion of the research report. 
During the first semester of course work, the student will be appointed a major 
adviser and a committee of 2 additional graduate faculty members. The 
committee will work with the student to prepare a specific plan of study. The 
major adviser will also serve as the director of the student's thesis. In all instances 
students will be required to pass comprehensive examinations upon completion 
of course work and prior to work on the thesis. 

Retention 

A 3.0 grade point average in course work taken at the 400 level and above is 
required. It is expected that students will be in full-time residence for a minimum 
of one calendar year. A maximum of 12 hours of relevant transfer credit may be 
accepted into the student's program. 

Theater 

The Department of Theater blends scholarship and practice into an academically 
based theater experience preparing the student for a career in professional, 
education, or community theater. The extensive production schedule in two 
theaters — a proscenium house, the McLeod Theater, seating about 500 and a 
flexible space, the Laboratory Theater, seating about 100 — provides training in 
all aspects of the theater augmented by courses in acting, voice, movement, 
directing, playwriting, production, design, and technical theater. Courses in 
theater history, dramatic theory and criticism, aesthetics, and specialized 
courses, e.g., children's theater and theater management, complement the 
program. Students in design and playwriting concentrations are required to 
widen their horizons by appropriate courses outside the department. Seminars in 
international and ethnic theater and drama coordinated with ongoing research 
projects enhance the total experience. 

The Department of Theater offers a graduate program of study leading to a 
Master of Fine Arts degree in theater. Doctoral study in theater is sponsored by 
the Department of Speech Communication. Interested students should consult 
the description of the program under speech communication. 



Academic Programs Theater / 211 

Admissions 

Two sets of forms — one to the Graduate School, another to the Department of 
Theater — must be submitted by the applicant. All forms should be requested from 
the director of graduate studies in theater. Applicants for graduate studies in 
theater must satisfy the minimum requirements of the Graduate School before 
being admitted to the department, which requires the submission of a personal 
and professional data form together with 3 letters of recommendation from 
former teachers or supervisors. 

Although an undergraduate major in theater is not essential for admission to a 
graduate degree program in theater, the director of graduate studies may require 
that certain course deficiencies in undergraduate subject areas are remedied. 
These requirements are stated in writing on the admissions approval form. 

There are additional requirements established by each of the four areas of study 
in the M.F.A. program. Applicants in the acting and acting/directing areas are 
interviewed and required to audition. Applicants in the production design/ 
technical areas are required to submit portfolio samples of their work. Applicants 
in the playwriting area must submit examples of their writings. More detailed 
information about these requirements is obtainable from: Director of Graduate 
Studies, Department of Theater, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, 
Carbondale, IL 62901 (618) 453-5741. 

Financial Assistance 

There are several kinds of financial assistance available to graduate students in 
the Department of Theater. First, there are graduate fellowships awarded on the 
basis of superior scholarship. Second, special fellowships are offered annually to 
students who show promise of success in graduate studies although their 
academic records have been only average due to economic disadvantages. The 
fellowships have no service requirements. Third, graduate assistantships (over 
$5,000 per academic year) are available to students who are employed in various 
academic support positions, such as teaching, researching, and in production. All 
fellowships and assistantships include a waiver of tuition (both in-state and 
out-of-state). Applications for financial assistance may be obtained by writing to 
the director of graduate studies. 

The Master of Fine Arts Degree Program 

The Master of Fine Arts degree program in theater emphasizes practical expertise 
in one of the following areas: acting, acting/directing, production design 
(separate concentrations in scenic, lighting, costume design, and technical 
direction), and playwriting. Coordination of cognate areas within the University 
structure offers the possibility of study in such interdisciplinary fields as 
dramatic literature, ethnic/international theater, and music theater, among 
others. In most instances, a minimum two year residency is required of all M.F.A. 
students. 

All M.F.A. students must complete a minimum of 51 semester hours of course 
work, including the M.F.A. degree core requirements: 

THEA 400-2 

THEA 500, 501-5 

Basic theater course in area 3 

Total M.F.A. core 10 

Besides the core requirements, the student will propose and successfully 
complete a project to qualify for further study in the chosen area. This project will 
be developed in concert with the student's committee consisting of three faculty 
members. 

In addition, each of the four areas of study has specific area and elective 
requirements which are as follows. 



212 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 



Acting. 

M.F.A. core (including THEA 417 or 517a) 10 hours 

Area requirements 31 hours 

Four semesters of Graduate voice 8 hours 

Four semesters of Graduate movement 8 hours 

Three semesters of Graduate acting 9 hours 

THEA 599 6 hours 
Electives (THEA 526a suggested) 10 hours 
Total: 51 hours 

Acting Directing. 

M.F.A. core (including THEA 402a) 10 hours 

Area requirements 26 

THEA 402b, 502-6 

THEA 503a, b-4 

THEA 513a, b-4 

THEA 517a. b-6 

THEA 599-6 
Electives (by advisement) 15 
Total: 51 hours 

Production Design, (separate concentrations in scenic/ lighting costume design 

and technical direction) 

M.F.A. core (including THEA 407) 10 hours 

Area requirements 26 

THEA 414, 418-6 

THEA 510-8 

Area theater electives 6 hours 

THEA 599-6 

Electives (by advisement) 15 
Total: 51 hours 

Playwriting. 

M.F.A. core (including THEA 411a) 10 hours 

Area requirements 26 

THEA 402a or b, or 502-3 

THEA 411b, 511, 526b-9 

THEA 504 or 505-3 

THEA 454 or 550-2 to 3 

THEA 530-3 to 2 

THEA 599-6 
Electives (by advisement) 15 
Total: 51 hours 

Thesis requirements vary for each area of study; however, they include a 
research component as well as a description and evaluation of the student's 
creative project. In concert with the student's committee, the candidate may 
choose to separate the two, submitting an approved research paper during the 
first academic year and a creative thesis after completion of the M.F.A. final 
project. 

The Department of Theater requires an oral examination, conducted by the 
student's thesis or dissertation committee, for each M.F.A. and Ph.D. degree 
candidate. The examination covers the thesis or dissertation, and may include 
questions designed to ascertain the student's general competence in theater. 



Academic Programs Theater / 213 



Vocational Education Studies 

The Department of Vocational Education Studies offers programs of study 
leading to the Master of Science in Education and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 
Information about either program may be obtained by writing: Coordinator of 
Graduate Studies, Department of Vocational Education Studies, Southern Illi- 
nois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. 

Master of Science in Education Degree 

The master's degree with a major in vocational education studies is designed to 
accommodate a broad range of individuals preparing for teaching and non- 
teaching roles in education, business, industry, government, and other fields. The 
major consists of a minimum of 30 semester hours of course work organized into 3 
components. 

Professional Core Requirements. This consists of 4 courses: VES 561, VES 566, 
VES 580, and EPSY 402. Students are required to take a minimum of 9 hours (3 
courses) from the core. 

Speciality Area Courses. This consists of 12-18 semester hours of course work 
relevant to a student's career goals. Technical courses, professional courses, 
individualized study, and internships may be included. Courses may be taken 
within the department or in other units of the college or University. 

Research Paper or Thesis. In accordance with Graduate School requirements, a 
research paper or thesis must be written showing evidence of the student's 
knowledge of research techniques. The majority of students select the research 
paper option. Students enroll in 3 semester hours of VES 593 to develop the 
research paper. Students choosing the thesis option will enroll for 6 semester 
hours of VES 599. 

The program of study is individually tailored based on the student's back- 
ground, interests, and career goals. Representative programs of study include: sec- 
ondary teacher of vocational or practical arts education, post-secondary technical 
teacher, local director of vocational education, coordinator of cooperative voca- 
tional education, industrial trainer, employment and training specialist, manager 
of human resource development, and extension adviser. Upon completion of all 
requirements, a final oral or written examination covering the course work and 
research paper or thesis is conducted by the student's advisory committee. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Education 

Advanced studies leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in education with a 
concentration in vocational education studies is offered through the Department 
of Vocational Education Studies. The concentration is a broad, general leader- 
ship, and professional development degree that caters to people having knowledge, 
experience, and interests in the fields of: (a) vocational and technical education, 
(b) career education, (c) employment and training, or related fields. Even though 
many students who enter the program have a specific service area identity (e.g., 
agriculture education, business education, health occupations education, home 
economics education, industrial education), the degree is not awarded in a service 
area specialty. 

Within the vocational education studies concentration a student may select one 
of 3 areas of specialization: (a) management, (b) professional development, or (c) 
research. The specialty area should be chosen based on the student's background, 
interests, and future career goals. 



214 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

Persons seeking admission to the program must meet all requirements for 
admission established by (a) the Graduate School of the University, (b) the 
College of Education, and (c) the Department of Vocational Education Studies. It 
is required that applicants possess a background of academic and professional 
experience which will provide a basis for advanced study and research. More 
specifically, the program is designed for individuals with a background and 
experience in teaching, program administration, or training and development. 
Admission to the concentration is determined by a screening committee composed 
of a minimum of 3 members of the graduate faculty of the Department of 
Vocational Education Studies. 

The program of study consists of 64 hours beyond the master's degree and 
includes an 8-hour professional seminar sequence in the College of Education, a 
15-hour departmental core, 17 hours of supportive studies which may include an 
internship, research tool competence, and 24 hours of dissertation credit. 

Zoology 

The Department of Zoology's teaching and research programs are supported by 
appropriate courses, equipment, and facilities in a modern life science building. 
Available are an electron microscope complex, a centralized animal holding unit, 
a variety of sophisticated computer facilities, shops for design and construction of 
research equipment, Morris Library with approximately 1.8 million volumes, spe- 
cialized research laboratories, and significant research collections. In proximity 
to the central campus are experimental ponds, wildlife enclosures, and natural 
laboratories. The Cooperative Fisheries and Wildlife Research laboratories, 
closely allied with the Department of Zoology, make important contributions to 
research facilities and research appointments for graduate students. The geo- 
graphic location, physiographic features, and prevailing land use practices of 
southern Illinois and adjacent states offer unequaled opportunities for the use of 
natural and man-made environments in teaching and research. Of special value 
are the numerous refuges and parks, a national forest, large acreages of surface- 
mined lands, and a variety of streams and lakes. The Department of Zoology 
offers the Master of Arts, Master of Science, and the Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. These degrees are awarded on the basis of demonstrated scholarship and 
the ability to organize, conduct, and report original research. Opportunities are 
available for experience in teaching and research. 

Admission 

Applicants for all graduate degrees must fulfill the requirements of the Graduate 
School. 

Applicants for the master's degree must possess the following academic 
background: 24 semester hours in courses covering the basic principles of zoology; 
one year of college chemistry (organic or biochemistry is also desirable); one year 
of college mathematics including college algebra and trigonometry (calculus and 
statistics are desirable). A grade point average of 2.70 (A = 4.0) or above. 
Applicants with less than 2.70 will be considered on individual merit. 

Applicants for the doctoral degree must demonstrate a sound background of 
academic training in the animal sciences; hold a master's degree or its equivalent 
and have a grade point average in graduate work of 3.25 or above. Accelerated 
entry after one semester in a master's degree program is possible for students 
demonstrating exceptional potential. 

Inquiries should be directed to the director of graduate studies in zoology. 
Separate applications must be made to the Graduate School and to the 
Department of Zoology. A completed departmental application for admission 
includes: departmental application form, transcript of all previous college credits, 



Academic Programs Zoology / 215 

scores from the aptitude test of the Graduate Record Examination, and three 
letters of evaluation relative to professional and academic competence. All 
applicants will be notified of the action taken on their application by the director 
of graduate studies in zoology. 

Advisement 

Following admission to the department, and prior to registration, a student 
should consult appropriate faculty (representing student's area of interest) or the 
director of graduate studies in zoology for assistance in registration. Each student 
must arrange with a faculty member to serve as an adviser no later than the end 
of the first semester of registration in the program. A change in the adviser will be 
coordinated by the director of graduate studies in zoology at the request of the 
student and with the approval of the current and prospective professors. 

Following selection and approval of an adviser, an advisory and research 
committee is to be recommended to the director of graduate studies in zoology for 
approval by the graduate dean. For the master's degree, the committee shall 
consist of a minimum of 3 members, 1 of whom may be from outside the 
department, with the adviser serving as chair. 

For the doctoral degree the advisory and research committee shall consist of 5 
faculty members, one of whom must be from outside of the department. The 
adviser shall serve as chair. 

A program of course work and research tools as required must be approved by 
the advisory and research committee, and made a part of the student's 
departmental file no later than the first week of the second semester of 
registration in the program. 

A research plan approved by the student's advisory and research committee 
must be placed in the student's departmental file prior to registration for ZOOL 
598, 599, or 600 and no later than the end of the second semester of registration in 
the program. 

While pursuing the completion of degree requirements, continuous registration 
is expected until such time as the degree has been completed. The number of hours 
required per session will reflect the extent of the demand for use of time and 
University and department facilities and academic personnel. 

Academic Credit 

Audited courses may not be counted toward completion of minimum hour 
requirements toward the degree. No course with a grade below C will fulfill 
minimal requirements of the degree. A petition for the use of transfer credits must 
be approved by the student's advisory and research committee and submitted to 
the director of graduate studies in zoology for forwarding to the dean of the 
Graduate School for approval. 

Master of Arts Degree 

A minimum of 30 hours of graduate credit is required beyond the bachelor's 
degree including at least 18 hours of formal course work in Zoology and 6 hours of 
ZOOL 599. 

In addition, one of the following tools is required: a foreign language either by 
completion of FL 488 with a grade of A or B or a score of at least 465 on the ETS 
proficiency exam, or two semesters of one of the following: statistics, computer 
science, mathematics, biochemistry, or biotechnology. 

A thesis embodying results and analysis of original research and a final 
examination are required. 

Master of Science Degree 

A minimum of 38 hours of graduate credit is required beyond the bachelor's 
degree including at least 24 hours of formal course work in zoology, and 2 hours of 



216 Graduate Catalog Chapter 2 

ZOOL 598. A research paper demonstrating the ability of the student to collect 
and analyze data and report results in a scientific manner is required. A library 
research problem is acceptable but must include an original contribution in the 
form of correlations and interpretations. A final examination is required. 

Required Level of Performance in Master's Degree Program. A cumulative grade 
point average of at least 3.0 must be attained during the first two semesters in all 
graduate level work, and must be maintained thereafter. Failure to meet this 
requirement will result in loss of any financial support provided by the 
department. A grade of C or better must be earned in all background (under- 
graduate) courses to remove deficiencies. 

Final Examination. 

1 . Each candidate for a master's degree is required to pass a final examination. 
The examination will be oral and should be taken no later than 4 weeks 
before graduation. 

2. The examination consists of 2 parts: 

a. Presentation of the results of the research in a seminar. 

b. A closed session of inquiry by the student's advisory and research 
committee following the seminar. 

Graduation. Candidates for a master's degree must follow and fulfill all 
Graduate School procedures and requirements for processing one's application 
for graduation. 

The Ph.D. Degree 

There is no minimal credit hour requirement beyond the Graduate School's 
residency and dissertation hour requirements. A student in consultation with an 
adviser prepares a program of study including courses in the major, in the minor, 
in areas of deficiency, and to complete the research tool requirement. This pro- 
gram when approved by the student's advisory and research committee is filed 
with the director of graduate studies in zoology. 

Acceptable tools include foreign language, statistics, computer science, mathe- 
matics, biochemistry, and biotechnology. Normally two tools are required; 
however, one tool with exceptional expertise may satisfy the requirement if 
approved by the student's committee (exception: English as a second language). 
A student may qualify in a foreign language by completion of FL 488 with a grade 
of A or B or a score of at least 465 on the ETS proficiency exam. To qualify in 
statistics, a student must have course work through multiple regression analysis, 
which is GUID 506 and 507. In computer science a student should take CS 202 and 
one of the following: 129, 215, 220, and 470. For the tool requirements in 
mathematics, biochemistry, and biotechnology, the student will arrange a pro- 
gram of 2 or 3 courses acceptable to the advisory committee. Previously acquired 
skills or knowledge may satisfy the tool requirement if the student passes an 
appropriate proficiency examination. 

A 3.25 grade point average in graduate level course work must be maintained; 
failure to meet this requirement will result in loss of any financial support 
provided by the department. No course in which the grade is below Cis acceptable 
for credit. 

Preliminary Examinations. These examinations (oral and written) are taken 
after the tool requirement and a major portion (approximately 80 percent) of 
formal course work are completed, usually at the end of the second year of 
graduate study. The student with the approval of the adviser, advisory committee, 
and the director of graduate studies in zoology registers with the chair of the 
preliminary examination committee to take the examination. The written exam- 



Academic Programs Zoology / 217 

ination evaluates basic competence in zoology, and the oral portion emphasizes 
the area of specialization and minor. 

Dissertation. The nature of the research to be used for the dissertation is 
established in consultation with the student's adviser, and is approved by the 
advisory and research committee. An approved copy of the research proposal is 
filed with the director of graduate studies in zoology. The student is required to 
register for a minimum of 24 semester hours in ZOOL 600, Dissertation Research. 
The dissertation is evaluated by the student's advisory and research committee, 
reviewed for approval by the chair and submitted to the graduate dean for final 
approval. 

Final Examination. Upon approval of the dissertation by the student's advisory 
and research committee, the candidate requests the director of graduate studies in 
zoology to schedule a seminar and a final examination. Following the seminar, 
the final examination over the dissertation is conducted by the student's 
committee. Both the seminar and examination are open to the public. 

Graduation. Candidates for a Ph.D. degree must follow and fulfill all Gradu- 
ate School procedures and requirements for processing one's application for 
graduation. 



3 



Course 
Descriptions 



In this chapter 400- and 500-level courses offered by Southern Illinois University 
at Carbondale are described. Courses are listed numerically within each subject- 
matter area. Areas are listed below in order of their appearance on the following 
pages. 



Accountancy 

Administration of Justice 

Agribusiness Economics 

Agricultural Education and Mechanization 

Agriculture 

Animal Science 

Anthropology 

Applied Linguistics 

Art 

Behavior Analysis and Therapy 

Biological Sciences 

Botany 

Business Administration 

Business Education 

Chemistry and Biochemistry 

Cinema and Photography 

Civil Engineering and Mechanics 

Communication Disorders and Sciences 

Communications and Fine Arts 

Community Development 

Computer Science 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Economics 

Education 

Educational Administration and Higher 

Education 
Educational Psychology 
Electrical Engineering 
Engineering 
Engineering Technology 
English 

English as a Foreign Language 
Finance 
Foreign Languages and Literatures 

Chinese 

Classics 

French 

German 

Japanese 

Russian 

Spanish 
Forestry 



Geography 

Geology 

Health Education 

Higher Education 

History 

Industrial Technology 

Journalism 

Linguistics 

Management 

Manuafacturing Systems 

Marketing 

Mathematics 

Mechanical Engineering and Energy 

Processes 
Medical Education Preparation 
Microbiology 
Mining Engineering 
Molecular Science 
Music 

Pharmacology 
Philosophy 
Physical Education 
Physics 
Physiology 

Plant and Soil Science 
Political Science 
Public Affairs 
Psychology 
Radio-Television 
Recreation 
Rehabilitation 
Religious Studies 
Science 
Social Work 
Sociology 
Special Education 
Speech Communication 
Statistics 

Telecommunications 
Theater 

Vocational Education Studies 
Zoology 



219 



220 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



Accountancy 



The first entry for each course is a three-digit identification numeral. Courses 
numbered 400-499 are open to both seniors and graduate students, unless desig- 
nated otherwise. Courses numbered above 499 are for graduate students only. 

Following the course identification number is another number which indicates 
maximum credit allowed for the course. The maximum may vary, and specific 
semester hours may be assigned for each term a course is offered. 

Following the course description may be prerequisites which must be satisfied 
before a student will be permitted to enroll. Graduate students will not receive 
graduate credit for Pass/ Fail grades taken at the 400 level. Graduate credit is 
awarded for 500-level courses which have been approved to be graded S/U 
(Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) only. 

All courses offered in a specific term will be listed in the appropriate Schedule of 
Classes which is published three times a year. They are available at University 
Electronic Communications, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, 
Carbondale, Illinois 62901. 

techniques. Hands on applications will be em- 
phasized. Prerequisite: junior standing and 
limited to accounting majors or consent of 
school; 361 with a grade of C or better. 
471-3 Accounting for Public Organiza- 
tions. Financial and managerial accounting 
concepts peculiar to the planning and admin- 
istration of public and quasi-public organiza- 
tions, such as governmental units, institu- 
tions, and charitable organizations. Includes 
the conventional budgetary-appropriation 
process, as well as some of the more recent 
accounting developments related to public deci- 
sion making. Prerequisite: 230 with a grade of 
C or better. 

495-1 to 6 Internship. Supervised work ex- 
perience in professional accounting. Prerequi- 
site: outstanding record in accounting and rec- 
ommendation of the departmental committee 
on internship. 

512-3 to 18 (3 per topic) Accounting Re- 
search Methods Seminar. An advanced 
seminar critically analyzing research methods 
employed to study problems existing in a 
subarea of accounting thought, which may be 
repeated for credit in terms of sections (a) 
through (f). Sections (a) through (f) may be 
taken only once each, (a) Auditing, (b) 
financial accounting, (c) managerial account- 
ing, (d) not-for-profit accounting, (e) ac- 
counting information systems, (f) taxation. 
Prerequisite: BA 513 or consent of the school. 
521-3 Emerging Issues in Accountancy. 
Identifies developing areas in financial ac- 
counting and forces students to research the 
issues, to think critically, evaluate alterna- 
tives, and communicate conclusions in oral 
and written form. International accounting, 
not-for-profit, standard setting and regulation, 
and other developing issues are addressed. The 
Journal of Accountancy, other professional 
journals, and guest speakers. Prerequisite: 321, 
322, or consent of instructor. 
522-3 Financial Accounting Theory. Con- 
temporary advanced accounting theory, in- 
cluding controversial issues with emphasis on 
net income determination and asset valuation; 
particular attention given to current pub- 
lications of the professional and government 
agencies. Prerequisite: 521 or consent of in- 
structor. 



421-3 Advanced Accounting. Accounting 
principles and procedures relating to special- 
ized topics, including partnership equity, in- 
stallment and consignment sales, fiduciaries, 
international operations, branches, and busi- 
ness combinations. Prerequisite: junior stand- 
ing and limited to accounting majors or con- 
sent of school; 322 with a grade of C or better. 
422-3 Current Developments in Account- 
ing Theory. Critical analysis of current de- 
velopments in accounting theory, especially as 
reflected in the publications of major ac- 
counting associations. Prerequisite: junior 
standing and limited to accounting majors or 
consent of school; 322 with a grade of C or 
better. 

431-3 Advanced Cost Accounting. Mana- 
gerial decision making; profit planning and 
control through relevant costing, return on in- 
vestment and transfer pricing, determination 
of cost behavior patterns, analysis of varianc- 
es, capital budgeting, inventory models, prob- 
abilities, statistical methods, and operations 
research. Prerequisite: junior standing and 
limited to accounting majors or consent of 
school; 331 with a grade of C or better. 
441-3 Advanced Tax. Study of income tax 
problems which arise from sole proprietorship, 
partnership, corporation, estate, and trust 
types of organization. Brief study of social 
security, federal and state estate tax, and gift 
tax. Student does research in source materials 
in arriving at solutions of complicated 
problems. Prerequisite: junior standing and 
limited to accounting majors or consent of 
school; 341 with a grade of C or better. 
451-3 Advanced Accounting Information 
Systems. A review of current systems design 
and operation methodologies with special 
attention to the advantages and disad- 
vantages these provide to an integrated infor- 
mation system. Prerequisite: junior standing 
and limited to accounting majors or consent of 
school; 351 with a grade of C or better. 
461-3 Advanced Auditing. The study and 
application of selected auditing concepts and 



Course Descriptions 



Accountancy / 221 



529-3 Seminar in Financial Accounting. 

Discussion of differences in accounting prac- 
tices in a variety of major industry groups. 
Prerequisite: 521 or consent of instructor. 
531-3 Controllership and Policy. Duties 
and responsibilities of a controller; key role of 
the management control system in the control- 
lership concept; information for managerial 
formulation of goals, objectives, policy, and 
programming; unique control problems for 
service, not-for-profit, and multinational com- 
panies; cybernetics behavioral considerations 
and administrative decision issues. Prerequi- 
site: 331 or consent of instructor. 
532-3 Advanced Management Account- 
ing. Management planning and control deci- 
sions and design and evaluation of manage- 
ment accounting systems requiring formal 
models and application of vigorous analytic 
reasoning. Integration and synthesis of tech- 
niques such as regression analysis, linear pro- 
gramming, decision theory, and behavioral 
science for important decisions of the form. In- 
formation economics. Contemporary research 
directories. Prerequisite: enrollment in M.Acc. 
or M.B.A. program or consent of instructor. 
541-3 Tax Concepts. Provides the student 
with an understanding of the nature of the 
federal tax law and an appreciation of the 
law's impact upon business decisions both for 
individuals and companies. Prerequisite: 341 
or consent of instructor. 

542-3 Tax Research and Procedure. Pro- 
vides the student with a working knowledge of 
the tax practitioner's methodology applied to 
the solution of both routine and complex tax 
problems. Prerequisite: enrollment in M.Acc. 
program or consent of instructor. 
543-3 Corporate Taxation. Provides stu- 
dents with in-depth exposure to federal income 
taxation of corporations and shareholders. 
Areas explored are corporate formations, dis- 
tributions, redemptions, liquidations, sub- 
chapter S election, corporate income tax, accu- 
mulated earnings tax, personal holding com- 
pany tax, and affiliated corporations. Prereq- 
uisite: enrollment in M.Acc. program or 
consent of instructor. 

544-3 Partnership Taxation. Provides stu- 
dents with in-depth exposure to the federal in- 
come taxation of partnerships and partners. 
Areas explored are the definition of a partner- 
ship, acquisition of an interest, basis of inter- 
est, tax accounting for partnership operation, 
distributions, termination, sale or exchange of 
interest, collapsible partnerships, death or re- 
tirement, and tax shelters. Prerequisite: enroll- 
ment in M.Acc. program or consent of 
instructor. 

545-3 Estate Planning. A comprehensive 
study of the various aspects of estate planning, 
including an analysis of the impact of the 
federal estate and gift tax laws. In addition, the 
role of wills, trusts, insurance, and other 
related legal topics necessary to formulate a 
comprehensive plan is emphasized. The case 
approach will be utilized wherever feasible. 
Prerequisite: enrollment in M.Acc. program or 
consent of instructor. 
546-3 Seminar: Selected Tax Topics. Pro- 



vides students with in-depth exposure to feder- 
al income taxation of selected topics. Topics 
will vary from semester depending upon in- 
structor and topics of current interest. Prereq- 
uisite: 541 or consent of instructor. 
547-3 Tax Accounting Principles. Pro- 
vides linkage of accounting skills with tax 
knowledge through identification of signifi- 
cant differences between tax and financial ac- 
counting and selection of tax accounting prin- 
ciples having a significant impact on cash 
flows. Tax accounting problems for industrial, 
wholesale, and retail companies. Prerequisite: 
541 or equivalent and 421. 
548-3 Interjurisdictional Tax. Examina- 
tion of tax accounting problems when taxable 
events transcend governmental boundaries. 
Compares use of transfer pricing for interna- 
tional tax purposes to use of allocation proce- 
dures for interstate tax purposes. Specific in- 
ternational tax problems of foreign persons, 
U.S. citizens living abroad, U.S. shareholders 
for foreign corporations, and other U.S. per- 
sons. Special problems related to interstate 
taxation. Prerequisite: 541 or equivalent and 
531 or consent of the school. 
551-3 Accounting Information Systems 
Concepts. Concepts and principles underly- 
ing the analysis, design, implementation, and 
control of information systems. Emphasizes 
designing and implementing particular com- 
puterized information systems for different 
purposes and uses, focusing on accounting in- 
formation systems in financial, managerial, 
and entrepreneurial decision-making. Prereq- 
uisite: 331, 351, 361, or consent of instructor. 
552-3 Accounting Information Systems 
II. Survey of the subsystems of a business in- 
formation system and their integration. Spe- 
cific attention will be given to the budgeting 
and planning systems and the accounting, 
marketing, and production subsystems. Pre- 
requisite: 551 or consent of instructor. 
561-3 Professional Dimensions of Ac- 
countancy. Study of ethical and professional 
conduct in the practice of financial and opera- 
tional audits. Includes a detailed look at codes 
of ethics and conduct in public accounting, in- 
dustrial accounting, internal auditing, gov- 
ernmental accounting, tax practice, and con- 
sulting. Prerequisite: 361 or consent of 
instructor. 

562-3 Advanced Auditing Topics. Exami- 
nation of state-of-the-art auditing topics in- 
cluding auditing EDP systems; microcomputer 
applications in analytical review procedures, 
internal controls, and tests of details; 
statistical techniques; operational and compli- 
ance auditing; and attestation engagements. 
Prerequisite: 561 or consent of instructor. 
571-3 Not-For-Profit Accounting. The 
study of accounting principles and practices of 
schools, hospitals, governmental agencies, the 
arts, and other not-for-profit organizations. 
Emphasis is on financial reporting. Pre- 
requisite: enrollment in M.Acc. program or 
consent of instructor. 

590-3 Seminar in Accounting. Discussion 
of current accounting theories, principles, 
standards, and problems. Prerequisite: enroll- 



222 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



ment in M.Acc. program or consent of 

instructor. 

591-1 to 6 Independent Study. Directed in- 
dependent study in selected areas of accoun- 
tancy. Prerequisite: enrollment in M.Acc. 
program. 

599-3 to 6 Thesis. Prerequisite: enrollment in 
M.Acc. program. 

601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S U or DEF only. 



Administration of Justice 

The following courses are offered through 
the Center for the Study of Crime, 
Delinquency, and Corrections. 

402-3 Group and Family Treatment in 
Criminal Justice. Presentation of theoretical 
knowledge and practical techniques utilized in 
major group and family treatment approaches 
for adults and juveniles in institutions, 
community-based correctional programs, and 
transitional living situations. 
403-3 to 9 (3 per topic) Enforcement Op- 
erations, (a) Advanced investigation, (b) En- 
forcement management, (c) Enforcement dis- 
cretion. This course offering provides a broad 
coverage of law enforcement activities from 
detailed investigative work through special- 
ized management techniques required. Some 
sections of the course may be offered only every 
other year. Prerequisite: (a) 303 or graduate 
status; (b) 202 or graduate status or consent of 
instructor. 

408-3 Criminal Procedure. An introduction 
to the procedural aspects of criminal law 
pertaining to police powers in connection with 
the laws of arrest, search and seizure, and the 
exclusionary rule, civil liberties, eavesdrop- 
ping, confessions, and related decision-making 
factors. Prerequisite: 310. 

415-3 Prevention of Crime and Delin- 
quency. Multidisciplinary analysis of the 
functions, goals, and effectiveness of measures 
to forestall delinquency and crime. Etiology of 
delinquent behaviors as related to community 
institutions such as police, courts, corrections, 
mental health clinics, schools, churches, and 
citizen groups. Prerequisite: 201 and 290 or 
consent of instructor. 

450-3 Public and Private Security. An 
overview of important issues related to inter- 
nal and external security and loss prevention. 
Covers security's historical development; its 
current role; different careers available; the 
prevention, detection, and reduction of haz- 
ards stemming from both internal and exter- 
nal sources; as well as certain administrative 
aspects. 



451-3 Forensic Interrogation. Forum fo- 
cusing on forensic interrogation; conceptual 
framework for understanding the behavioral 
and psychological aspects of the process; dis- 
cussion of its historical and philosophical de- 
velopment, general use in criminal and private 
security investigations, legal proceedings, and 
importance in a democratic society. Students 
receive both theoretical grounding and hands- 
on experience. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

460-3 Women and the Criminal Justice 
System. Addresses the topics of women as 
offenders, as victims, and as workers in the 
criminal justice system. Prerequisite: 201 and 
290 or consent of instructor. 
472-3 The American Correctional Sys- 
tem. (Same as Sociology 472.) A survey of the 
correctional field, covering probation, institu- 
tional treatment, and parole. Historical devel- 
opment, organizational structure, program 
content, and current problems. Prerequisite: 
201 and 290 or consent of instructor. 
473-4 Juvenile Delinquency. (See Sociolo- 
gy 473.) Prerequisite: 201 and 290 or consent of 
instructor. 

474-3 Juvenile Justice. The evolving defi- 
nition of juvenile misbehavior and the legal 
mechanisms that emerged to control it. The 
problems and promise of juvenile justice in the 
terms of the juvenile code and court, law en- 
forcement, juvenile institutions both custodial 
and treatment, and community treatment. 
Prerequisite: none. 473 or equivalent recom- 
mended. 

476-3 Crime and Criminal Justice: Inter- 
national Dimensions. Examination of so- 
ciocultural and political factors shaping crimi- 
nality and response to crime around the world. 
Similarities and differences in criminogenic 
conditions and practices of law enforcement 
and corrections are traced. Prerequisite: 201 
and 290 or consent of instructor. 
485-3 Corrections and the Community. 
Traditional correctional functions are rede- 
fined to emphasize development of resources of 
community at large, diversion of convicted 
offenders from institutions, and direct in- 
volvement of correctional programs in com- 
munity affairs. Prerequisite: three administra- 
tion of justice courses or consent of instructor. 
490-1 to 3 Independent Study in the Ad- 
ministration of Justice. Supervised read- 
ings or independent investigative projects in 
the various aspects of crime control, treatment 
of offenders; and management of programs of 
law enforcement, courts, and correctional 
agencies. May be repeated up to a maximum of 
three credit hours. Prerequisite: 201 and 290 or 
consent of instructor. 

492-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per semester) Contem- 
porary Issues in Administration of Jus- 
tice. A forum for focusing on special interest 
topics depending on the availability of staff, 
visiting professors, and other selected instruc- 
tional resources to cover a contemporary issue 
of concern to students and the faculty. May 
reenroll for a maximum of six credits. Prerequi- 
site: 201 and 290 or consent of instructor. 
500-3 Foundations of Criminal Justice. 
An exploration of the nature and scope of the 



Course Descriptions 



Administration of Justice / 223 



criminal justice process. Criminal justice oper- 
ations and behavior are assessed in context of 
the major theoretical, historical, normative, 
and organizational influences found in the 
field. 

504-3 Criminological Theory. Multidisci- 
plinary study of biogenic, psychogenic, and 
sociogenic explanations for criminal behavior 
relevant to policy-making and practice in 
criminal justice. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

516-3 Scope and Method of Criminal Jus- 
tice Inquiry. Principles of scientific inquiry 
applied to the study of crime and criminal jus- 
tice. Examines the interrelationship of theory 
and research techniques, development of hy- 
potheses and problem statements, different 
approaches to data collection, and research 
designs. 

517-3 Seminar in Advanced Quantitative 
Techniques in Administration of Justice 
Research. Examination and application of 
multivariate analytic techniques often utilized 
in criminal justice research; including but not 
limited to multiple regression, multivariate 
analysis of variance, discriminant analysis, 
factor analysis, and log-linear and logistic 
modeling. 

562-3 Fundamental Legal Concepts in 
the Administration of Justice. Includes the 
origin of rights, a review of the historical 
development and current use of civil rights; due 
process, equal protection, and cruel and 
unusual punishment; affirmative action, the 
limits of governmental action; and the appli- 
cation of these doctrines to various populations 
such as criminal justice personnel, prisoners, 
women, and minorities. 

571-3 Correctional Systems in Criminal 
Justice. Evaluation of corrections as a sys- 
tem, its programmatic interrelationships and 
conflicts, and the probable course of its future 
development. Prerequisite: consent of in- 
structor. 

578-1 to 4 Seminar in Correctional Re- 
habilitation Counseling. Review of major 
issues and research relative to rehabilitation 
practices in youth and correctional settings. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
580-3 Planning for Change in the Ad- 
ministration of Justice. Examines the 
planning of change in criminal justice. 
Presents perspectives and models used in un- 
derstanding the dynamics of planned change 
and why change efforts succeed or fail. Dis- 
cusses types of change strategies, targets of 
change, and levels of intervention with focus 
on broad-based organizational and system- 
level change. 

582-3 Criminal Law and the Correctional 
Process. Basic principles and administration 
of the criminal law and the legal foundations of 
the juvenile court, the sentencing process, 
parole and probation, and the changing 
concept of mental competency. Includes statu- 
tory, case, and administrative law require- 
ments of "due process" in correctional services. 
584-3 Administration and Management 
in Criminal Justice. Focuses on the develop- 



ment and history of administrative theory and 
its impact on management techniques involv- 
ing administration of justice bureaucracies. 
587-3 Seminar in Law Enforcement. Mul 
tidisciplinary study of the philosophical prem- 
ises, theoretical implications, and functions of 
contemporary law enforcement. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. 

588-3 to 6 (3 per topic) Selected Topics in 
the Administration of Justice and Public 
Safety, (a) Personnel administration. Issues 
and processes in the education, selection, 
training, and promotion of administration of 
justice personnel are reviewed, (b) Policy and 
program evaluation. Examination of ap- 
proaches and problems in the analysis and 
evaluation of criminal justice personnel, poli- 
cy, and problems, with attention paid to both 
process and outcome analyses. 
590-1 to 3 Supervised Readings in Se- 
lected Subjects. Readings supervised by a 
faculty member in a selected area of the Ad- 
ministration of Justice. Prerequisite: consent 
of a faculty sponsor. 

591-3 to 6 Individual Research. A field 
project directed by a faculty committee which 
represents the study of a problem confronted 
during field experience centering on an applied 
criminal justice topic and results in a project or 
program development plan. Graded S/ U only. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
592-3 Advanced Seminar in Administra- 
tion of Justice. Seminars of varied content 
for advanced students. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

595A-3 or 6 Supervised Field Work (In- 
ternship). Experience in law enforcement 
agencies, juvenile courts, probation and parole 
departments, correctional institutions, de- 
linquency control programs, and public or vol- 
untary agencies. Orientation sessions precede 
placement. Student must submit internship 
application during the first 30 days of the pre- 
ceding spring or fall semester. Graded S/ U 
only. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
595B-3 or 6 Supervised Field Work (In- 
ternship). Experience in law enforcement 
agencies, juvenile courts, probation and parole 
departments, correctional institutions, de- 
linquency control programs, and public or vol- 
untary agencies. Orientation sessions precede 
placement. Student must submit internship 
application during the first 30 days of the pre- 
ceding spring or fall semester. Graded on a 
letter grade basis. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

599-1 to 6 Thesis. Graded S, U only. Prereq- 
uisite: consent of academic coordinator. 
601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/U or DEF only. 



224 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



Agribusiness Economics 

Field trips are required for certain courses. 

401-3 Agricultural Law. Relations of com- 
mon-law principles and statutory law to land 
tenure, farm tenancy, farm labor, farm man- 
agement, taxation, and other programs in- 
volving agriculture. Prerequisite: junior stand- 
ing or consent of instructor. 
402- 1 to 6 Problems in Agribusiness Eco- 
nomics. Designed to improve the techniques 
of agribusiness economics workers through 
discussion, assignment, and special work- 
shops on problems related to their field. Em- 
phasis will be placed on new innovative and 
currently developed techniques for the field. 
Prerequisite: consent of chair. 
440-3 Land Resource Economics. (Same 
as Economics 471.) The use of land as an eco- 
nomic variable in producing goods and servi- 
ces; land markets; public versus private land 
conflicts; and land-use planning in an institu- 
tional setting. Prerequisite: 12 hours of agri- 
cultural economics, or economics credit, or 
graduate status, or consent of instructor. 
444-3 Agricultural Development. Analy- 
sis of the economic, social, political, cultural, 
and institutional facts related to economic 
growth and development in agricultural sector. 
Framework for evaluating outcome of al- 
ternative strategies in agricultural production, 
marketing, and government policies that 
affect output, income distribution, and re- 
source use in agriculture and the related 
agroindustrial complex. Prerequisite: 204. 
450-3 Advanced Farm Management. Ap- 
plication of production economic principles 
and modern decision-making techniques to 
farm management problems. The importance 
of information, sources of agricultural risk and 
management of risk in farm planning will be 
integrated. Prerequisite: 350 or equivalent, and 
GE-D 107. 

451-2 Farm Real Estate Appraisal. Prin- 
ciples and practices of farm real estate ap- 
praisal. Application of capitalization, market 
and cost approaches for estimating market 
value. Understanding of special valuation 
methods used for buildings, insurance, assess- 
ments, loans, and condemnation. Field trips 
not to exceed $10. Prerequisite: 350 or consent 
of instructor. 

453-3 Agribusiness Planning Tech- 
niques. Application of mathematical pro- 
gramming to agribusiness and farm planning 
including enterprise selection, resource alloca- 
tion, least cost ration formulation, decision- 
making under risk and uncertainty, and trans- 
portation and location problems. Emphasis 
placed on modeling problems and interpreta- 
tion of results. Prerequisite: 350 or consent of 
instructor. 

460-3 Agricultural Prices. Measurement 
and interpretation of factors affecting agricul- 
tural prices. Construction of index numbers, 
trend analysis, seasonal and cyclical price 



movements, and the measurement of relation- 
ships between price and other variables. Pre- 
requisite: 362 or equivalent. 
461-3 Agriculture Business Manage- 
ment. Examination of agribusiness firm 
management with an emphasis on the man- 
agement and control of financial resources and 
the interrelationship between the agribusiness 
firm and human resource management. Other 
topics in agribusiness include effective com- 
munication in the management process, busi- 
ness ethics, and workable credit programs for 
customers. Prerequisite: 351 and 360 or 
equivalent. 

462-3 Advanced Agricultural Marketing. 
Advanced treatment of marketing issues from 
both theoretical and practical decision-making 
perspectives. Marketing margins, intertem- 
poral, and spatial price relations are reviewed 
in detail. Historical and current grain and 
livestock price series are utilized in decision- 
making exercises. Prerequisite: 362 or 
equivalent. 

500-6 (3,3) Agribusiness Economics Re- 
search Methodology, (a) Social science re- 
search methodology in agriculture, including 
defining research problems, hypothesis for- 
mation, specification of research design, sur- 
vey methodology, source of data, and develop- 
ment of research proposals, (b) A survey of 
applied techniques and procedures for develop- 
ing and evaluating agricultural economic re- 
search models with an emphasis on multiple 
regression and time-series models. Prerequi- 
site: EPSY 506 or equivalent. 
551-3 Resource Allocation in the Agribu- 
siness Firm. An examination of resource al- 
location in the agribusiness firm. Production 
decisions, agricultural product price analysis, 
and decision making models are considered. 
Prerequisite: six hours of agricultural econom- 
ics or economics or consent of instructor. 
552-3 Problems and Policies of the Agri- 
cultural Sector. An analytical survey of ag- 
ricultural policy issues including agricultural 
price and income stabilization; international 
trade, capital and credit, the structure of agri- 
culture, and the quality of life in rural areas. 
Prerequisite: six hours of agricultural econom- 
ics or economics or consent of instructor. 
581-1 to 4 Seminar in Agribusiness Eco- 
nomics. Seminar on current research and is- 
sues in agribusiness economics on topics such 
as farm management, farm policy, agricultur- 
al marketing, farm finance, agricultural prices, 
and international agriculture. 
588-1 to 8 International Graduate Stud- 
ies. University residential graduate study 
program abroad. Prior approval by the depart- 
ment is required both for the nature of pro- 
gram and the number of semester hours of 
credit. 

590-1 to 4 Readings. Readings in specialized 
topics under the direction of an approved 
graduate faculty member. Graded S/ U only. 
593-1 to 4 Individual Research. Directed 
research in selected topics under the supervi- 
sion of an approved graduate faculty member. 
Graded S/U only. 
599-1 to 6 Thesis. Work in the research for 



Course Descriptions 



Agribusiness Economics / 225 



and presentation of a thesis under the supervi- 
sion of an approved faculty member. Graded 
S/ U only. 

601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/U or DEF only. 



Agricultural Education 
and Mechanization 

Field trips are required for certain courses. 

402-1 to 12 (1 to 6 per topic) Problems in 
Agricultural Education and Mechaniza- 
tion, (a) Agriculture education, (b) Agriculture 
mechanization. Designed to improve the 
techniques of agricultural education and 
mechanization workers through discussion, 
assignment, and special workshops on prob- 
lems related to their field. Emphasis will be 
placed on new innovative and currently devel- 
oped techniques for the field. A limit of six 
hours will be counted toward graduation in a 
master's degree program. Prerequisite: consent 
of chair. 

411-3 Program Development in Agricul- 
tural Extension. Principles and procedures 
in developing extension programs with em- 
phasis on program determination and meth- 
ods. Prerequisite: junior standing. 
412-3 Methods of Agricultural Mechani- 
zation. Theory and use of educational materi- 
als and devices adaptable to the needs and 
interest of educators involved in agricultural 
mechanization laboratories. There is a $15 ad- 
ditional charge for this course. 
414-3 Adult Education Procedures, 
Methods, and Techniques. Determining 
adult education needs and interests of the com- 
munity. Securing and organizing the informa- 
tion needed for adult education programs and 
planning teaching activities. 
415-3 Beginning Teacher Seminar. The 
application, in the professional field setting of 
principles and philosophies of the education 
system. Includes application of principles of 
curricula construction, programming student 
and community needs. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

418-3 Applications of Integrated Soft- 
ware/Agriculture. (Same as Vocational Ed- 
ucation Studies 409.) Design of agricultural or 
educational applications of integrated software. 
Spreadsheet, database, wordprocessing, and 
graphic and communications software will be 
applied to the solution of agricultural problems. 
Individual student projects will be the focus of 
the applied nature of the class. Prerequisite: 
junior standing or consent of instructor. 



472-3 Agricultural Tractors and Engines. 
Tractor performance and selection, principles 
of operation, maintenance analysis, and tunc 
up of multi-cylinder farm type internal 
combustion engines. There is a $5 additional 
charge for this course. 

473-2 Advanced Agricultural Electricity. 
Application of electricity to agricultural prob- 
lems. An emphasis on principles of electrical 
distribution on the farm and/or the agri- 
business operation. Planning the efficient us- 
age of electricity. Prerequisite: 373 or 
equivalent. 

474-3 Advanced Agricultural Structures. 
A study of design characteristics, construction, 
methods, and environmental control applica- 
ble to agricultural structures. Design con- 
struction and environment are considered 
from the standpoint of the function of the 
building in an agricultural enterprise. Prereq- 
uisite: 384 or equivalent. 

483-3 Agricultural Materials Handling, 
Processing, and Storage. Arrangement of 
systems for animal waste disposal, feed han- 
dling and processing, and storage of agricul- 
tural products. Prerequisite: 373 or 384 or 473 or 
474. 

500-3 Agricultural Education and 
Mechanization Research Methodology. 
Social science research methodology in agri- 
culture including defining research problems, 
preparing project proposals, and sources of 
data. 

501-3 Recent Research in Agricultural 
Education. A study of recent research and 
development in agricultural education. The 
course includes an analysis of regional and 
national scholarly publications, procedures, 
and products. Prerequisite: graduate status 
and consent of instructor. 
525-3 Program Development in Agricul- 
tural Education. Analysis and appraisal of 
current trends in agricultural education pro- 
gram development. Attention is given to impli- 
cations for educators at the high school, post 
secondary, and in extension education posi- 
tions. Offered each year, alternating spring 
and summer semesters. 

526-3 Professional Development in Ag- 
ricultural Education. Recent developments 
and trends in agricultural education are pre- 
sented for review and discussion. The role of 
the agricultural instructor in determining edu- 
cational priorities is emphasized. Offered each 
year, alternating fall and summer semesters. 
571-3 Current Problems and Research in 
Agricultural Power and Machinery. A 
study and analysis of current problems, re- 
search findings, and innovations in agricul- 
tural power units and machinery. Prerequisite: 
472 or equivalent. 

581-1 to 8 (1 to 4 per topic) Seminar, (a) 
Agriculture education, (b) Agriculture mecha- 
nization. Study and discussion in selected top- 
ics under the supervision of an approved grad- 
uate faculty member. A maximum of four 
hours can be counted toward a Master of Sci- 
ence degree. 

588-1 to 8 International Graduate Stud- 
ies. University residential graduate study 



226 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



program abroad. Prior approval by the depart- 
ment is required both for the nature of pro- 
gram and the number of semester hours of 
credit. 

590-1 to 4 Readings. Readings in specialized 
topics under the direction of an approved 
graduate faculty member. Graded S/ U only. 
593-1 to 4 Individual Research. Directed 
research in selected topics under the supervi- 
sion of an approved graduate faculty member. 
Graded S U only. 

595-1 to 4 Agricultural Occupation In- 
ternship. Prepares coordinators to fulfill their 
responsibilities in selected areas in agri- 
cultural related occupations through an in- 
ternship in the area of specialization and 
through orientation to related technical infor- 
mation. Prerequisite: consent of department. 
599-1 to 6 Thesis. Work in the research for 
and presentation of a thesis under the supervi- 
sion of an approved faculty member. Graded 
S 17 only. 

601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/U or DEF only. 



Agriculture 



401-3 Fundamentals of Environmental 
Education. (Same as Forestry 401 and Recre- 
ation 401.) A survey course designed to help 
education majors develop an understanding of 
environmental problems and an awareness of 
how these types of problems can be handled 
both inside and outside the classroom. Prereq- 
uisite: ten hours of biological science, or ten 
hours of recreation or education, or consent of 
instructor. 

423-3 Environmental Interpretation. 
(Same as Forestry 423 and Recreation 423.) 
Principles and techniques of natural and cul- 
tural interpretation. Two hours lecture, three 
hours laboratory. Approximately $10 cost for 
field trips. Prerequisite: ten hours biological 
science or ten hours of recreation. 
450-2 Farming Systems Research and 
Development. Introduction to farming sys- 
tems, which is an interdisciplinary approach 
to agricultural research and development em- 
phasizing small farms. The whole farm is 
viewed as a system of interdependent compo- 
nents controlled by the farm household. Fo- 
cuses on analyzing the interactions of these 
components as well as the physical, biological, 
and socioeconomic factors not controlled by 
the household. Techniques of analysis are ap- 
plicable domestically and internationally. 
481-1 International Agricultural Semi- 
nar. Discussion of special topics relating to 



worldwide agricultural development. Prereq- 
uisite: consent of instructor. 



Animal Science, Food, 
and Nutrition 

Field trips are required for certain courses. 

409-4 Equine Science. Designed for stu- 
dents in the more scientific aspects of equine 
physiology and management. The class will 
take a more advanced look at anatomy and 
physiology of the systems in the equine and 
consider how they relate to selection, use, and 
management. Lecture and laboratory. Prereq- 
uisite: 219, 220 or equivalent, 331 or PHSL 210. 
410-3 Meat Science. Chemical, physical, 
and nutritional properties of meat and meat 
products. Topics covered include muscle func- 
tion, tissue growth and development, aspects 
of post mortem change including rigor mortis, 
meat microbiology, methods of analysis and 
quality control. Prerequisite: 210, CHEM 140 or 
equivalent, and a course in physiology. 
414-2 Animal Feed Quality Control. Lab- 
oratory procedures for nutrient determinations 
used in animal feed quality control. Pre- 
requisite: CHEM 140 or equivalent. 
415-3 Monogastric Nutrition. Advanced 
principles and practices involved in meeting 
nutrient requirements of monogastric animals. 
Prerequisite: 215 and 315. 
416-3 Ruminant Nutrition. Practical knowl- 
edge gained of problems associated with 
digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nut- 
rients as related to domestic ruminants, hors- 
es, and other pseudoruminants. Prerequisite: 
215 and 315. 

419-3 Stable Management. This course is 
designed for the advanced equine science stu- 
dent who is planning a career in the horse field. 
The class will teach in-depth management 
techniques on an applied basis. Students will 
have the unique opportunity to learn both 
theory and application of management in one 
course. One hour lecture, four hours laboratory. 
Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: 219, 409. 
420-4 Commercial Poultry Production. 
Principles and practices of management of 
broilers, layers, and turkeys as adapted to 
commercial operations. Field trip. Offered fall 
semester of even numbered years. Prerequisite: 
315 or consent of instructor. 
421-2 International Animal Production. A 
study of world animal production practices with 
emphasis on the developing countries. Adapta- 
bility of animals to environmental extremes 
and management practices employed to im- 
prove productivity. Prerequisite: junior stand- 
ing plus 121 or one year of biological science. 
430-4 Dairy Cattle Management. Applica- 
tion of the principles of breeding, nutrition, 
physiology, and economics to management of 
a profitable dairy herd. Breeds of dairy cattle, 
housing, milking practices, and quality milk 
production. Field trip. Students enrolled will 



Course Descriptions 



Animal Science, Food, and Nutrition / 227 



incur field trip expenses of approximately $25. 
Prerequisite: 315, 332. 

431-4 Reproductive Physiology of Do- 
mestic Animals. Comparative anatomy and 
physiology of the male and female reproduc- 
tive system of domestic animals; hormones, 
reproductive cycles; mating behavior; gesta- 
tion and parturition; sperm physiology; collec- 
tion and processing of semen; artificial 
insemination; pregnancy tests; diseases. Pre- 
requisite: 121 or a course in physiology. 
432-2 Quantitative Inheritance of Farm 
Animals. A review of the genetic principles 
underlying changes in animal breeding popu- 
lation; interpretations of gene frequency, her- 
itability, and genetic correlations; application 
of selection and breeding systems in farm ani- 
mals. Prerequisite: 332. 

434-2 Physiology of Lactation. Anatomy 
and physiology of milk secretion; endocrine 
control; milk precursors and synthesis; milk 
composition; physiology and mechanics of 
milking, mastitis. Offered only fall semester of 
odd numbered years. Prerequisite: course in 
physiology. 

455-2 Animal Waste Management. Ac- 
quaints the student with the scope and prob- 
lems involved with animal waste manage- 
ment, current regulations and laws on envi- 
ronmental protection. Principles covering 
waste management technology and current 
livestock waste management systems are pre- 
sented. Field trips will be scheduled. Prerequi- 
site: junior standing. 

465-4 Swine Production. Swine production 
systems and management techniques includ- 
ing breeding and selection, reproduction, nu- 
trition, herd health and disease prevention, 
housing and waste management, marketing, 
production costs and enterprise analysis. Field 
trip. Prerequisite: 315 and 332 or consent of 
instructor. 

480-3 Sheep Production. Breeding, feeding, 
and management of sheep. Field trip. Pre- 
requisite: 315. 

481-1 Current Topics in Equine Science. 
Seminar course exploring selected topical 
concerns in the horse industry. Students will 
prepare and present an individual seminar on 
current scientific work in the equine area. Such 
areas of study might include but are not 
limited to behavior, nutrition, reproduction, 
management, veterinary advances, and gen- 
eral and exercise physiology. Prerequisite: 
419. 

485-4 Beef Production. Beef cattle produc- 
tion systems and management, breeding and 
selection, reproduction, nutrition, and herd 
health with emphasis on the most economical 
and efficient systems. Field trip. Students en- 
rolled will incur field trip expenses of approxi- 
mately $5. Prerequisite: 315 and 332 or consent 
of instructor. 

500-3 Research Methods in Agricultural 
Science. Experimental design and biometry 
as applied to biological and allied fields. Pre- 
requisite: graduate student. 
502-2 Surgical Research Techniques in 
Farm Animals. Basic methods of experimen- 
tal surgery and sampling of biological materi- 



als in research on farm animals. Practice of 
techniques discussed in the lectures. Prerequi- 
site: consent of instructor. 
506-3 Instrumentation Methods in Agri- 
cultural Science. Basic methods and tech- 
niques of spectrophotometric and chromato- 
graphic instrumentation are taught in the 
lectures with application of instruments 
carried out in the laboratories. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. 

515-3 Energy and Protein Utilization. 
Energy and protein utilization including di- 
gestion, absorption, and metabolism as related 
to domestic animal production. Prerequisite: 
CHEM 344 and 345. 

516-3 Minerals and Vitamins in Animal 
Nutrition. Basic and applied principles of 
mineral and vitamin metabolism. Emphasis 
on metabolic functions, reaction mechanisms 
and interrelationships. Prerequisite: CHEM 
344 and 345. 

531-2 Topics in Theriogenology. Current 
research topics in reproduction of domestic 
mammals are discussed in relation to improv- 
ing production technology. Emphasis is on 
neural and endocrine control mechanisms that 
may be modified to increase animal pro- 
ductivity. Prerequisite: 431. 
581-1 to 2 (1,1) Seminar. Problems relating 
to various phases of animal industries. Maxi- 
mum of one hour per semester. 
588-1 to 8 International Graduate Stud- 
ies. University residential graduate study 
program abroad. Prior approval by the depart- 
ment is required both for the nature of the pro- 
gram and the number of credit hours. 
590-1 to 3 Reading in Animal Industries. 
Reading in specialized fields under direction of 
approved graduate specialists. 
593-1 to 3 Individual Research. Investiga- 
tion of a problem in animal science under the 
supervision of an approved graduate 
specialist. 

599-1 to 6 Thesis. Credit is given for a mas- 
ter's thesis when it is accepted and approved by 
the thesis committee. 

601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/[/orZ)£Fonly. 



Anthropology 



400A-3 Theory and Method in Physical 
Anthropology. Current topics in biological 
evolution and variation, including the theoret- 
ical and methodological background to each. 
Topics will be drawn from the four major areas 
of physical anthropology: genetics and evolu- 
tionary theory, primate studies, human fossil 
record, and human variation. Prerequisite: 



l^cS 1 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



300a for undergraduates or consent of 
instructor. 

400B-3 Theory and Method in Linguistic 
Anthropology. History of linguistic anthro- 
pology. Description and analysis of languages. 
Origin, development, and acquisition of 
language. Theory of symbolic systems. Hu- 
man and animal communication. Historical 
linguistics. Language in culture and society. 
Prerequisite: 300b for undergraduates or con- 
sent of instructor. 

400C-3 Theory and Method in Archaeol- 
ogy. Overview of the currents and controver- 
sies in anthropological archaeology in their 
historical and theoretical context. Topics in- 
clude history of archaeological theory, expla- 
nation in archaeology, limitations of the ar- 
chaeological record, and archaeological ap- 
proaches to the study of cultural variation. 
Prerequisite: 300c for undergraduates or con- 
sent of instructor. 

400D-3 Theory and Method in Sociocul- 
tural Anthropology. Overview of contempo- 
rary approaches to social and cultural research 
in anthropology. Attention is given to such 
topics as structural functionalism, cultural 
ecology, dialectical and cultural materialism, 
ethnoscience, sociobiology, neo-Darwinism, 
symbolism, and cross-cultural comparison. 
Problem areas investigated include kinship, 
social structure, comparative economics, politi- 
cal organization, religion, culture and per- 
sonality, environmental adaptation, cultural 
change. Prerequisite: 300d for undergraduates 
or consent of instructor. 

402-3 People and Culture. Offered primari- 
ly for non-anthropology majors. Focuses on the 
nature of culture, cultural processes, and 
culture change with emphasis on social, politi- 
cal, economic, artistic, religious, and linguistic 
behavior of humans as individuals and in cul- 
tural groups. 

404-3 Art and Technology in Anthropol- 
ogy. An introduction to the basic ways in 
which people utilize the natural resources of 
their habitat to meet various needs, such as 
food, shelter, transportation, and artistic ex- 
pression. The nature of art, its locus in culture, 
and its integration into technological society 
will be considered. 

406-3 Conservation Archaeology. The 
method and theory of archaeology in relation- 
ship to local state and federal laws regarding 
the protection and excavation of antiquities. 
Emphasis is on problem-oriented survey and 
excavation, as well as the preparation of ar- 
chaeological contacts and the writing of re- 
ports to satisfy statutes involving environ- 
mental concerns. Prerequisites: 300C, or 400C, 
or consent of instructor. 

409-3 History of Anthropology. The de- 
velopment of anthropological thought in the 
four subfields of the discipline (sociocultural, 
physical, linguistics, archaeology). Emphasis 
is on concepts, ideas, and work of major practi- 
tioners of the early 19th to the middle of the 
20th centuries, and on the major trends that 
have led to specialties found in anthropology 
today. The present status of anthropology as 
an academic discipline is briefly explored, and 



an attempt is made to assess the future of the 
discipline in terms of intellectual and practical 
concerns. 

410A-3 Applied Anthropology. The practi- 
cal applications of theoretical social anthro- 
pology. Problems of directed culture change 
are examined from an anthropological per- 
spective as they apply to the work of the educa- 
tor, social worker, extension agent, adminis- 
trator, and others who are attempting to guide 
change in the lifeways of others in Western 
culture and the third world. Prerequisite: none. 
300D recommended for undergraduates. 
410B-3 Educational Anthropology. An 
examination of the cultural processes of formal 
and informal education, the use of anthro- 
pological premises in educational program de- 
sign, bicultural-bilingual education programs, 
comparative American/non-American sys- 
tems, and the teaching of anthropology. Pre- 
requisite: none. 300D recommended for 
undergraduates. 

410C-3 Economic Anthropology. The 
study of non-Western economic systems. Pre- 
requisite: none. 300D recommended for 
undergraduates. 

410D-3 Anthropology of Folklore. A com- 
parative study of the role of folklore in various 
cultures of the world, with emphasis upon non- 
literate societies. Analysis of motifs, taletypes, 
themes, and other elements; comparisons 
between nonliterate and literate groups. Pre- 
requisite: none. 300D recommended for 
undergraduates. 

410E-3 Anthropology of Law. Anthropo- 
logical thought on imperative norms, morality, 
social control, conflict resolution and justice in 
the context of particular societies, preliterate 
and civilized. Law of selected societies is 
compared to illustrate important varieties. 
Prerequisite: none. 300D recommended for 
undergraduates. 

410F-3 Anthropology of Religion. A com- 
parative study of (religious) belief systems, 
with emphasis upon those of non-literate soci- 
eties. Examination of basic premises and ele- 
ments of these belief systems, normally ex- 
cluded from discussions of the "Great 
Religions". Prerequisite: none. 300D recom- 
mended for undergraduates. 
410G-3 Psychological Anthropology. 
Similarities and differences in personality 
structures cross-culturally including the his- 
torical development of this as an anthropolo- 
gical subdiscipline. Prerequisite: none. 300D 
recommended for undergraduates. 
410H-3 Ethnomusicology of Oceania, 
Asia, and Africa. A survey of theory, method, 
structure, organology, and cultural context of 
the ethnomusicology of Oceania, Asia, and 
Africa. 

4101-3 Ethnomusicology of Middle East, 
Europe, and the New World. A survey of 
theory, method, structure, organology, and 
cultural context of the ethnomusicology of Eu- 
rope and the New World. 
410J-3 Kinship and Social Organization. 
Universal features of non-Western systems 
of kinship terminology and social organi- 
zation. Topics include the structure and func- 



Course Descriptions 



Anthropology / 229 



tioning of kinship systems, lineages, clans, 
sibs, phratries, moieties, and tribal units. Pre- 
requisite: none. 300D recommended for 
undergraduates. 

410K-3 Ecological Anthropology. An ex- 
amination of the relationship of past and 
present human populations in the context of 
their natural and social environments. Prereq- 
uisite: 300c and 300d or equivalent. 
425-3 Cognitive Anthropology. The theory 
of culture as cognitive organization is explored. 
Among the topics are: formal analysis of 
lexical domains, folk classifications and 
strategies, the problem of psychological valid- 
ity, linguistic determinism and relativity, 
biogenetic and psycholinguistic bases of cog- 
nition, and the "new ethnography". 
430A-3 Archaeology of North America. 
Detailed study of the early cultures of North 
America. Emphasis on the evolutionary cul- 
tural development of North America. Prereq- 
uisite: 300C or 400C or consent of instructor. 
430B-3 Archaeology of Meso-America. 
Detailed study of the early cultures of Meso-A- 
merica with emphasis on the evolutionary cul- 
tural development of Meso-America. Prerequi- 
site: 300C or 400C or consent of instructor. 
430C-3 Archaeology of the Southwest. 
Detailed study of the early cultures of the 
Southwest with emphasis on the evolutionary 
cultural development of the area. Prerequisite: 
300C or 400C or consent of instructor. 
430D-3 Archaeology of the Old World. 
Detailed study of the early cultures of the Old 
World with emphasis on the evolutionary cul- 
tural development of the area. Prerequisite: 
300C or 400C or consent of instructor. 
430E-3 Archaeology of the Eastern 
Woodlands. Detailed study of the early cul- 
tures of the North American eastern wood- 
lands with emphasis on the evolutionary de- 
velopment of cultures. Prerequisite: 300C, 305, 
400C, or 430A or consent of instructor. 
440A-3 Human Evolution. An advanced 
consideration of the fossil evidence for human 
evolution and evaluation of the various theo- 
ries regarding the course of human evolution. 
Prerequisite: 300A or consent of instructor. 
440B-3 Race and Human Variation. A con- 
sideration of the range, meaning, and signifi- 
cance of contemporary human biological 
variation, including evolutionary and adaptive 
implications and the utility of the race concept. 
Prerequisite: 300A or consent of instructor. 
441-6 (3,3) Laboratory Analysis in Ar- 
chaeology, (a) Emphasizes methods of anal- 
ysis in archaeology as part of a larger research 
design created by the student. May be taken 
independently or as a follow-up to 496. (b) Em- 
phasizes technical methods of the physical and 
natural sciences in archaeological analysis, as 
used in environmental reconstruction, dating, 
and for the investigation of production and 
exchange. 

442-1 to 12 Working with Anthropologi- 
cal Collections. Management, curation, and 
analysis of anthropological collections as part 
of a research project created by the student. 
May be taken independently or as a follow-up 
to 450, 495, 496, or 597. 



444-3 Human Genetics and Demography. 

A course in human genetics with an em- 
phasis on population genetics and demogra- 
phy of modern and ancient human popula- 
tions. Prerequisite: 300A, 400A or consent of 
instructor. 

450-6 (3,3) Museum Studies. A detailed 
study of museum operation to include (a) 
methodology and display and (b) administra- 
tion, curation, and visits to or field work with 
area museums. Practical museum work will be 
stressed in both (a) and (b) and (a) must be 
taken before (b). 

455-3 to 1 5 (3 per topic) Topics in Physical 
Anthropology. Intensive study of one of the 
major subfields within physical anthropology. 
(a) Dental anthropology, (b) Laboratory 
methods, (c) Primate behavior and evolution. 
(d) Quantitative methods, (e) Epidemiology. 
Prerequisite: 300a or consent of instructor. 
460-1 to 12 Individual Study in Anthro- 
pology. Guided research on anthropological 
problems. The academic work may be done on 
campus or in conjunction with approved off- 
campus (normally field research) activities. 
470-3 to 24 People and Cultures. A survey 
of the prehistory, cultural history, and contem- 
porary cultures of the area in question. Topical 
emphasis may vary from course to course and 
year to year, (a) Africa, (b) Asia, (c) Caribbean, 
(d) Europe, (e) Latin America, (f) Near East 
and North Africa, (g) North America, (h) 
Oceania. Prerequisite: a basic acquaintance 
with geography and history of the areas. 
480-3 Honors Seminar. Topics to be ar- 
ranged by agreement of participating faculty 
and students. Not open to graduate students. 
Prerequisite: consent of department. 
490-3 Field Methods and Analysis in Lin- 
guistic Anthropology. Includes theoretical 
background and a project in the linguistic 
aspects of culture. Prerequisite: 300b, 301, or 
400b. 

495-6 to 8 Summer Ethnographic Field 
School. An eight-week field research training 
program in Southern Illinois communities. 
Students will attend seminars on campus and 
in the field, but the greater part of the time will 
be spent engaging in continuous team research 
under the direction of the faculty members 
involved in the program. Some form of co- 
operative living arrangement in the field will 
be organized. The program is open to advanced 
undergraduate and graduate students. Prereq- 
uisite: consent of instructor. 
496-1 to 8 Field School in Archaeology. 
Apprentice training in the field in archaeologi- 
cal method and theory. Students will be ex- 
pected to be in full-time residence at the field 
school headquarters off campus. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. 

499-3 Honors Thesis. Directed reading and 
field or library research. The student will write 
a thesis paper based on original research. Not 
open to graduate students. Prerequisite: con- 
sent of department. 

501-6 (3,3) Practicum in Educational An- 
thropology. Provides anthropology students 
actual classroom experience in a lower divi- 
sion anthropology course. Students will be in- 



230 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



volved in the teaching of designated courses. 
The instructor of record will meet with practi- 
cum members on a regular basis, critique their 
lectures, and together with them work out 
problems and plan future direction of the 
course. Graded S U only. Prerequisite: Ph.D. 
level or successful completion of core course 
requirements at the M.A. level. 
510-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
New World Archaeology. From year to 
year, the areal and topical coverage of this 
course will vary, as will the instructors. Stu- 
dents should consult the department about 
subjects to be covered. 

511-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
Meso-American Archaeology. From year 
to year, the areal and topical coverage of this 
course will vary, as will the instructors. Stu- 
dents should consult the department about 
subjects to be covered. 

512-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in Old 
World Archaeology. From year to year, the 
areal and topical coverage of this course will 
vary, as will the instructors. Students should 
consult the department about subjects to be 
covered. 

513-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
Archaeology. Seminars in varying topics in 
archaeology. Students should consult depart- 
ment about subjects to be covered. 
515A-3 Seminar in Social-Cultural An- 
thropology. Discussion of anthropological 
concepts of social structure and related topical 
themes, based upon extensive reading selected 
from a large number of sources. Prerequisite: 
409 or consent of instructor. 
515B-3 Seminar in Social-Cultural An- 
thropology. Intensive analysis of a limited 
set of monographs organized around a theoret- 
ical problem or set of problems. Prerequisite: 
409 or consent of instructor. 
520-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
New World Ethnology. From year to year, 
the areal and topical coverage of this course 
will vary, as will instructors. Students should 
consult the department about subjects to be 
covered. 

521-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
Ethnology of Latin America. From year to 
year, the areal and topical coverage of this 
course will vary, as will the instructors. Stu- 
dents should consult the department about 
subjects to be covered. 

522-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in the 
Anthropology of Oceania. From year to 
year, the areal and topical coverage of this 
course will vary, as will the instructors. Stu- 
dents should consult the department about 
subjects to be covered. 

523-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
Anthropology of Africa. From year to year, 
the areal and topical coverage of this course 
will vary, as will the instructors. Students 
should consult the department about subjects 
to be covered. 

530-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
Physical Anthropology. Seminars in vary- 
ing topics in physical anthropology. Students 
should consult the department about subjects 
to be covered. 



540-3 Pidgin and Creole Languages. 

(Same as Linguistics 507.) Survey of the 
world's pidgins and Creoles, with emphasis on 
the English-based Atlantic Creoles. Compari- 
son of creolization with first and second lan- 
guage acquisition, and with the origin and ev- 
olutionary development of human language. 
Prerequisite: one previous course in linguistics 
or consent of department. 
545-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
Anthropological Linguistics. From year to 
year, the areal and topical coverage of this 
course will vary, as will the instructors. Stu- 
dents should consult the department about 
subjects to be covered. 

560-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
Comparative Social Organization. From 
year to year, the areal and topical coverage of 
this course will vary, as will the instructors. 
Students should consult the department about 
subjects to be covered. 

562-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in the 
Anthropology of Contemporary Peoples. 
From year to year, the areal and topical 
coverage of this course will vary, as will the 
instructor. Students should consult the depart- 
ment about subjects to be covered. 
565-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
Culture Change and Development. From 
year to year, the areal and topical coverage of 
this course will vary, as will the instructor. 
Students should consult the department about 
subjects to be covered. 

567-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
Anthropological Theory and Method. 
From year to year, the areal and topical cover- 
age of this course will vary, as will the instruc- 
tors. Students should consult the department 
about subjects to be covered. 
576-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
Anthropological Research Design. Super- 
vised training in the preparation of anthropolog- 
ical research designs. Requirements will include 
completed research proposals involving the rela- 
tion of data to theory and results in the general 
sub-areas of archaeological, physical, social, 
and linguistic anthropology. Coverage will 
vary. Students should consult the department. 
581-2 to 6 (2 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
Anthropology. From year to year, the areal 
and topical coverage of this course will vary, as 
will the instructor. Students should consult the 
department about subjects to be covered. 
585-1 to 12 (1 to 3 per semester) Readings 
in Anthropology. Guided readings to cover 
special topics and fill gaps in the student's 
specialized anthropological background, to be 
arranged with department. 
590-1 to 12 Internship in Conservation 
Archaeology. The purpose of this course is to 
allow pre-professional archaeologists to be in- 
troduced to an actual archaeological or admin- 
istrative milieu. This will normally take the 
form of a supervised field project, but the 
project may be excavation, survey, or aspects 
of administration. Graded S/ U only. 
595-3 Field Methods in Ethnology. An- 
thropological methods of inquiry and docu- 
mentation of cultures and habitat together 
with appropriate instruction in the technique 



Course Descriptions 



Anthropology / 231 



of field work such as photography and sound 
recording. 

597-1 to 12 Fieldwork in Anthropology. 
To be arranged with department. Graded S/ U 
only. 

599-1 to 6 Thesis. 

600-1 to 32 (1 to 12 per semester) 
Dissertation. 

601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/U or DEF only. 



Applied Linguistics 



(See Linguistics.) 



Art 

Art studio courses (400-499, 500-598) are 
directed toward individual research in the 
student's major field. Emphasis is placed 
upon the history, materials, processes, 
and ideas that form the content and 
experience of the major field. 

Courses in this department may require 
the purchase of supplemental materials. 
Permission of the major adviser in each 
studio is required for enrollment in studio 
courses. 

400-3 to 30 (6,6,3,3 to 15) Advanced 
Drawing I. (a) Figure drawing. Not for grad- 
uate credit. Prerequisite: 300a, b, c. (b) Individ- 
ual research. Not for graduate credit. Prerequi- 
site: 400a. (c) Senior seminar and exhibition. 
Not for graduate credit. Prerequisite: 400b. (d) 
Independent study in drawing. Prerequisite: 
for undergraduates 400b; for graduates, con- 
sent of major adviser. Incidental expenses may 
exceed $50 for each section. 
401-3 to 30 (6,6,3,3 to 15) Advanced 
Painting I. (a) and (b) Individual problem 
solving with emphasis on technical and con- 
ceptual synthesis. Not for graduate credit. Pre- 
requisite: for a, 301a, b, c; for b, 401a. (c) Senior 
seminar and exhibition. Not for graduate cred- 
it. Prerequisite: 401b. (d) Independent study in 
painting. Prerequisite: for undergraduates, 
401b; for graduates, consent of major adviser. 
Studio fee for a, b, and d $3. Incidental expen- 
ses may exceed $50 for each section. 
402-3 to 30 (6,6,3,3 to 15) Advanced 
Printmaking. (a) Advanced techniques in 
printmaking to include intense work in color 
printing. Not for graduate credit. Prerequisite: 
302, 6 hours, (b) Individual research with em- 
phasis on history, processes and ideas which 
lead to the formation of personal content. Not 



for graduate credit. Prerequisite: 402a. (c) Sen- 
ior seminar and exhibition. Not for graduate 
credit. Prerequisite: 402b. (d) Independent 
study in printmaking. Prerequisite: for under- 
graduates, 402b; for graduates, consent of ma- 
jor adviser. Studio fee: for a, b, and d, $10 per 
credit hour enrolled. Incidental expenses may 
exceed $50 each section. 

403-3 to 30 (6,6,3,3 to 15) Advanced 
Sculpture I. (a) Foundry techniques and 
direct metal fabrication. Not for graduate 
credit, (b) Individual research with emphasis 
on history, materials, processes, and ideas to 
form personal content. Not for graduate credit. 
Prerequisite: 403a. (c) Senior seminar and 
exhibition. Not for graduate credit. Prerequi- 
site: 403b. (d) Independent study in sculpture. 
Prerequisite: for undergraduates, 403b; for 
graduates, consent of major adviser. In- 
cidental expenses may exceed $75 for each 
section. 

404-3 to 27 (3,6,3,3 to 15) Advanced Ce- 
ramics I. (a) Assigned individual problems 
with emphasis on ceramic form and glazing. 
Not for graduate credit. Prerequisite: 304, 6 
hours, (b) Individual research with emphasis 
on kiln theory and design. Not for graduate 
credit. Prerequisite: 404a. (c) Senior seminar 
and exhibition. Not for graduate credit. Pre- 
requisite: 404b. (d) Independent study in ce- 
ramics. Prerequisite: for undergraduates, 404b; 
for graduates, consent of major adviser. Studio 
fee: for a, b, and d, $24 to $48 per credit hour 
enrolled. Incidental expenses may exceed $20 
for each section. 

405-3 to 27 (3,6,3,3 to 15) Advanced Me- 
talsmithing I. (a) Emphasis will be placed on 
advanced processes to develop individual 
expression. Not for graduate credit. Prerequi- 
site: 305a and b. (b) Media exploration to 
develop individual styles. Not for graduate 
credit. Prerequisite: 405a. (c) Senior seminar 
and exhibition. Not for graduate credit. 
Prerequisite 405b. (d) Independent study in 
metalsmithing. Prerequisite: for undergradu- 
ates, 405b; for graduates, consent of major 
adviser. Studio fee: for a, b, and d, $8 per credit 
hour enrolled. Incidental expenses may exceed 
$75 for each section. 

406-3 to 27 (3,6,3,3 to 15) Advanced Fi- 
bers I. (a) Individual design problems. Not for 
graduate credit. Prerequisite: 306b. (b) Indi- 
vidual research with emphasis on the intensive 
use of fibers as a creative medium. Not for 
graduate credit. Prerequisite: 406a. (c) Senior 
seminar and exhibition. Not for graduate cred- 
it. Prerequisite: 406b. (d) Independent study in 
fibers. Prerequisite: for undergraduates, 406b; 
for graduates, consent of major adviser. Studio 
fee for a and b, $17 per credit hour enrolled; for 
d, $15 to $30 per semester. Incidental expenses 
may exceed $75 for each section. 
408-2 to 9 (2 to 3, 2 to 3, 2 to 3) Basic 
Research in Art Education. Each student 
demonstrates via class presentation, term pa- 
pers and answers to exam question, a knowl- 
edge of basic research techniques and applica- 
tions; important literature in the field of art 
education; broad research meanings; a theory 
of art education and material on behavioral ob- 



232 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



jectives presented in class and via tape-slide 
self instruction programs. 
414-3 to 2 1 Glass I. A studio course designed 
for the beginning glass student focusing 
initially upon basic "flat glass" and cold 
working techniques and processes. Course- 
work includes projects intended to familiarize 
the student with designing and executing 
products in stained glass. Student will be in- 
troduced to forming techniques in glassblow- 
ing. Studio fee $12 per credit hour enrolled. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
415-4 Creative Look at Reclamation 
Possibilities for Massively Disturbed 
Land. Presents the possibility that massively 
disturbed areas can be aesthetic resources if 
potential inherent in these sites can be recog- 
nized and addressed. Presented in seminar/ 
lecture/ studio format with selected lectures 
given by invited speakers. Discussions include 
recognition of massive land disturbance; rec- 
lamation as a concept; environmental art and 
design; the questions a potential developer or 
designer of disturbed land should ask and 
where they might look for expert advice; and 
group critiques on student studio projects. 
Studio projects will involve the visualization in 
2- and 3-dimension formats of plans for the 
reclamation of the students' chosen site with 
accompanying documentation. 
427-3 Renaissance Art. An examination of 
various topics appropriate to a study of Ren- 
aissance art, both northern and Italian, during 
the 15th and 16th centuries in Europe. The 
emphasis is on a range of art history problems 
and methods of approach. Field trip required. 
Prerequisite: 207a or consent of instructor. 
437-3 Baroque and Rococo Art. An exami- 
nation of various topics appropriate to a study 
of Baroque and Rococo art in western Europe. 
Emphasis upon a range of art historical prob- 
lems and methods of approach. Field trip re- 
quired. Prerequisite: 207a or b, or consent of the 
instructor. 

447-3 Introduction to Museology. A sur- 
vey of museum and gallery techniques (em- 
phasis upon practical exhibit development) 
which will involve answering questions con- 
cerning contractual agreements, taxes, insur- 
ance, packing, shipping, exhibit design and 
installation, record systems, general handling, 
public relations, and sale of art works directed 
toward problems encountered by the artist 
outside the privacy of the studio. Prerequisite: 
art major or consent of instructor. 
457-3 Women in the Visual Arts. (Cross- 
listed as Women's Studies 427.) Consists of a 
survey of women's contributions and partici- 
pation in the visual arts from the middle ages 
through the Twentieth century. Through lec- 
ture, discussion and research, painting, sculp- 
ture, architecture, crafts, film, photography, 
and other forms of visual art will be covered. 
Screening fee $10. 

467-3 Critical Issues in Contemporary 
Art. An examination of the style and meaning 
of contemporary art in relation to the current 
political, social, and cultural issues. Will in- 
clude visual arts, architecture, and communi- 
cations media. 



477-3 American Art of the Thirties. A so- 
cio-political and artistic study of American art 
during the decade of the Great Depression. 
Course material will be divided in three parts: 
l)a survey of art trends during the Thirties 
concentrating on traditional art forms such as 
painting, sculpture, and architecture, 2)an in- 
vestigation into government-subsidized art 
programs, and 3)recent governmental and cor- 
porate patronage of the arts through such pro- 
grams as the National Endowment. 
487-6 (3,3) American Art. (a) U.S. art to 
1913, study of American art from native Indian 
settlements through Colonial period to 20th 
Century. Attention to such art forms as: paint- 
ing, sculpture, and architecture, as well as the 
rich and varied Indian folk and craft tradi- 
tions, (b) U.S. art since 1876, study of American 
art and design from Industrial Revolution to 
present. Attention to such traditional art forms 
as: painting, sculpture, and architecture, as 
well as many facets of modern design. Prereq- 
uisite: 207a,b. 

497-3 to 6 (3 per topic) Problems in Art 
History. A close examination of selected 
categories of works of art from various periods, 
media, and cultures, as illustrative of 
particular art historical problems. Topics will 
vary and include (a) portraiture, (b) landscape 
and still life, (c) narrative, (d) other selected 
topics. Sections (a) through (c) may be taken 
only once each section, (d) may be repeated as 
topics vary. Art historical perspectives to 
include formal analysis, conography, art 
theory, social history, connoisseurship. Pre- 
requisite: 300 level art history course or consent 
of instructor. 

499-3 to 21 Individual Problems. Art stud 
io course directed toward individual research 
in the student's major field. Emphasis is placed 
upon the history, materials, processes, and 
ideas that form the content and experience of 
the student's major field. Designed to adapt to 
students' individual needs in problem re- 
search. Prerequisite: senior standing in the 
School of Art, a 3.0 average, and consent of 
instructor. 

500-3 to 2 1 Advanced Drawing II. A studio 
directed toward individual research in the 
student's major field. Emphasis is placed upon 
the historical materials, processes, and ideas 
that form the content and experience of the 
student's major field. Prerequisite: consent of 
major adviser. 

501-3 to 21 Advanced Painting II. Art 
studio course directed toward individual re- 
search in the student's major field. Emphasis 
is placed upon the history, materials, process- 
es, and ideas that form the content and experi- 
ence of the student's major field. Prerequisite: 
consent of major adviser. 
502-3 to 21 Advanced Printmaking II. 
Advanced studio course in printmaking direct- 
ed toward individual research in the student's 
choice of print media. Emphasis is on the pro- 
cesses which lead to the formation of personal 
content. Studio fee $13 per credit hour enrolled. 
Prerequisite: graduate status and consent of 
instructor. 



Course Descriptions 



Art/ 233 



503-3 to 21 Advanced Sculpture II. Ad 

vanced studio course directed toward in- 
dividual research in the student's major field. 
Emphasis is placed upon the history, mate- 
rials, processes, and ideas to form content in 
the student's medium. Incidental expenses 
may exceed $100. Prerequisite: consent of 
major adviser. 

504-3 to 21 Advanced Ceramics II. Art 
studio course directed toward individual re- 
search in the student's major field. Coursework 
is designed to assist the student's discovery of 
ceramic form and content as applied to 
personal artistic expression. Emphasis upon 
the development of creative studio research 
techniques and seminar-type experiences ex- 
ploring historical and contemporary issues as 
they relate to ceramic art. Studio fee $40 to $80 
per credit hour enrolled. Incidental expenses 
may exceed $50. Prerequisite: consent of major 
adviser. 

505-3 to 21 Advanced Metalsmithing II. 
Art studio course directed toward individual 
research in the student's major field. Emphasis 
is placed upon the history, materials, pro- 
cesses, and ideas that form the content and 
experience of the student's major field. Studio 
fee $8 per credit hour enrolled. Prerequisite: 
consent of major adviser. 
506-3 to 21 Advanced Fibers II. Art studio 
course directed toward individual research in 
the student's major field. Coursework is de- 
signed to assist the student's discovery of fi- 
bers and content as applied to personal artistic 
expression. Emphasis upon development of 
creative studio research techniques and semi- 
nar-type experience exploring historical and 
contemporary issues as they relate to fibers. 
Studio fee $20 to $40. Prerequisite: consent of 
major adviser. 

507-3 to 6 (3,3) Readings in Art History. 
Individual assistance and investigation to dis- 
cover new meaning and involvement in gradu- 
ate studio work through the literature of art. 
508-2 to 9 (2 to 3, 2 to 3, 2 to 3) Research in 
Art Education. Each student demonstrates 
via class presentations, a term paper, surveys 
of research reports and formulations of 
research designs, an understanding of ad- 
vanced art education research procedures, 
analyses and implications; new process and 
product research techniques; and research in 
artistic creativity, perception, and the evolu- 
tion of art images. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

514-3 to 21 Glass II. An advanced glass 
course intended to increase the student's 
knowledge of the potential of glass as a medi- 
um of creative expression and to refine studio 
skills associated with the material. Course- 
work will include the investigation of historical 
and contemporary solutions to aesthetic 
problems related to the medium. Studio fee $12 
per credit hour enrolled. Prerequisite: consent 
of major adviser or consent of instructor. 
517-3 to 6 (3,3) Concepts in Art History. 
Group seminar to discuss and present aspects 
of the history of art in relation to both tradi- 
tional and contemporary artistic concerns. 
518-2 to 9 (2 to 3, 2 to 3, 2 to 3) Seminar 



in Art Education. Each student shows evi- 
dence, via class presentation, a term paper and 
evaluations of individual and group projects, 
an understanding of important literature; the 
latest developments and trends in philo- 
sophical, psychological, and sociological 
concepts in art education and methods for de- 
veloping rationale for art curriculum and in- 
struction programs. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

599-2 to 6 Thesis. Art studio course directed 
toward individual research in the student's 
major field. Emphasis is placed upon the histo- 
ry, materials, processes, and ideas that form 
the content and experience of the student's 
major field. 

601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/U or DEF only. 



Behavior Analysis and 
Therapy 



(See Rehabilitation.) 



Biological Sciences 

(See Chapter 2 for description of the 
biological sciences program.) 

Botany 

For all field courses in botany, students 
will be assessed a transportation fee. In 
addition, certain courses may require the 
purchase of additional materials and 
supplies, generally $1 to $5 in total cost. 

400-4 Plant Anatomy. An introduction to 
cell division, development and maturation of 
the structures of the vascular plants. Labora- 
tory. Prerequisite: 200 or consent of instructor. 
404-4 The Algae. A phylogenetic approach 
to the study of algae with emphasis on com- 
parative cytology, morphology, and ecology. 
Laboratories include a detailed survey of 
freshwater algae and a general treatment of 
representative marine forms. Two lectures and 
two two-hour laboratories per week. Pre- 
requisite: 204 and 205 or consent of instructor. 
405-4 The Fungi. A survey of the fungi — 
their structure, development, relationships, 
ecological roles, and economic importance. 
Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequi- 
site: 204 or equivalent. 



234 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



406-3 Bryology. Structure, development, 
and relationships of the liverworts, horn- 
worts, and mosses. Two lectures and one labo- 
ratory per week. Prerequisite: 204 or 
equivalent. 

409-3 Field Mycology. The taxonomy, ecol- 
ogy, and distribution of fungi in southern Illi- 
nois and environs with emphasis on tech- 
niques of specimen collection, preservation, 
identification, and recognition. Prerequisite: 
200; 204 recommended. 

410-3 Taxonomy and Ecology of Bryo- 
phytes and Lichens. Floristic studies of the 
moss, liverwort, horn wort, and lichen commu- 
nities of southern Illinois. Prerequisite: 200 or 
equivalent, or consent of instructor. 
411-3 Morphology of Ferns and Fern Al- 
lies. The study of external form, internal 
structure, and relationships of ferns and fern 
allies. Two lectures and one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite: 204; 400 recommended. 
412-3 Morphology of Gymnosperms. The 
study of external form, internal structure, and 
relationships of gymnosperms. Two lectures 
and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 204; 
400 recommended. 

413-3 Morphology of Angiosperms. The 
study of external form, internal structure, and 
relationships of the flowering plants. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
site:204; 400 recommended. 
414-3 Paleobotany. (Same as Geology 414.) 
The study of external form, internal structure, 
and relationships of plant fossils. Two lectures 
and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 204; 
400 recommended. 

421-4 Botanical Microtechnique. Intro- 
duction to practical methods of preservation 
and preparation of plant materials for labora- 
tory and microscopic study. Paraffin and 
plastic embedding, and sectioning techniques, 
and use of general and histochemical stains 
stressed. Includes chromosome squashing, 
whole-mount preparation, photomicrography, 
and other techniques. One lecture and three 
laboratories per week. Prerequisite: 200 or 
equivalent. 

425-10 (5,5) Advanced Plant Physiology. 
(a) Intermediary plant metabolism. Charac- 
terization of the photosynthetic and metabolic 
pathways of biosynthesis and degration of or- 
ganic constituents; role of environmental reg- 
ulants of plant metabolism, (b) Physics of 
plants; membrane phenomena; water rela- 
tions; mineral nutrition. Prerequisite: 320 and 
consent of instructor. 

430-3 Economic Botany. Classification, ev- 
olution, domestication, and botanical charac- 
teristics of plants useful to people. Offered 
every year. Prerequisite: 200 or equivalent. 
439-2 Natural Areas and Rare and En- 
dangered Species. Evaluation of the natural 
area preservation concept with emphasis on 
how to detect natural areas and methods to 
preserve them. Emphasis on the rare and en- 
dangered species program, its significance, 
and its methodology. Prerequisite: 304, BIOL 
307. 

440-3 Grassland Ecology. A study of grass- 
land structure and function in relation to vari- 



ous biotic and abiotic factors. Cost of field trips 
($5) and textbooks must be incurred by the 
student. Prerequisite: 304 and BIOL 307 or 
equivalents. 

443-4 Forest Ecology and Reclamation. 
Soil, climatic, and genetic factors affecting tree 
distribution and growth in disturbed and 
natural habitats. Saturday field trips. Prereq- 
uisite:BIOL 307 or equivalent. 
444-4 Analysis and Classification of 
Vegetation. Includes concepts and analytical 
methods pertaining to plant community 
energetics, nutrient dynamics, succession, 
vegetation classification and niche theory. 
Laboratory will include the application of 
these concepts and methods to field situations. 
Cost of textbooks and travel fee ($15) must be 
incurred by the student. Prerequisite: BIOL 307 
or equivalent. 

446-4 Tropical Ecology. Two weeks of ma- 
rine ecology on the atolls and extensive barrier 
reef off the coast of Belize, British Honduras, 
and two weeks of terrestrial ecology at several 
locations inland. Cost varies yearly. Summer. 
Prerequisite: advanced undergraduate or 
graduate standing in one of the biological sci- 
ences, and concurrent enrollment in ZOOL 
446. 

447-2 to 6 Field Studies in Latin America. 
Two to six weeks of intensive field work to 
acquaint students with the flora and vegeta- 
tion in various environments of Latin America 
and with ecological and taxonomic field 
techniques. Cost varies with type of study and 
location. Transportation cost: $80. Prerequi- 
site: advanced standing in one of the biological 
sciences and consent of instructor. 
448-3 to 8 Field Studies in the Western 
United States. Three to six weeks of intensive 
field work designed to acquaint students with 
the flora, vegetation, and environments of the 
Rocky Mountains and adjacent areas. Both 
ecological and taxonomic field methods are 
emphasized. Transportation cost ($100), travel 
expenses, and textbooks must be incurred by 
the student. Prerequisite: 304, BIOL 307 or 
equivalents, and consent of instructor. 
449-2 Elements of Taxonomy. Principles of 
taxonomy including historical sketch, phyletic 
concepts, classical and experimental methods. 
One lecture and three laboratory hours per 
week. Prerequisite: 304 or equivalent, or 
consent of instructor. 

450-2 Plant Geography. World distribution 
of plants related to environmental, floristic, 
and historical factors. Prerequisite: interest in 
biology. 

451-4 Upland Flora. The taxonomy, ecolo- 
gy, and distribution of the natural vegetation 
in and around upland habitats of the Missis- 
sippi Basin. Prerequisite:304 or GE-A 303 or 
consent of instructor. 

456-2 Advanced Plant Pathology. A study 
of the changes occurring in host and pathogen 
at the host-parasite interface before, during, 
and after penetration. Control measures will be 
discussed and emphasis will be on midwest 
field crops. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite: 
356 or consent of instructor. 
457-2 Advanced Forest Pathology. A sur- 



Course Descriptions 



Botany / 235 



vey of recent literature on major forest diseases 
with emphasis on host-parasite interactions 
and disease control. Students will develop 
detailed literature reviews on selected pa- 
thology problems and design experiments for 
solving these problems. Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisite: 357 or consent of instructor. 
462-4 Science Process and Concepts for 
Teachers of Grades N8. (Same as Curric- 
ulum and Instruction 427.)Specifically de- 
signed to develop those cognitive processes 
and concepts needed by elementary teachers in 
the teaching of modern science programs. 
Lecture three hours per week, laboratory two 
hours per week. One or two additional field 
trips required. 

484-3 Palynology. (See Geology 484.) 
485-2 Botanical Literature. A survey of the 
major classical and modern writings in the 
botanical sciences. This includes a considera- 
tion of the primary subdivisions; systematics, 
structure, physiology, genetics, and ecology. In 
addition, periodicals will be treated. Prereq- 
uisite: consent of instructor. 
490-3 Photographic Methods in Scientific 
and Biological Photography. Black and 
white and color. Specimen photography, ma- 
crophotography. Slides for presentation, ma- 
terials and methods used in scientific publica- 
tions. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
491-3 Scientific Illustration. Materials and 
methods used in illustrating scientific publica- 
tions including two-dimensional graphs, maps, 
lettering, and line drawings. Three dimensional 
techniques will also be covered. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. 

492-2 to 6 Honors in Botany. Individual 
research problems available to qualified jun- 
iors and seniors. Prerequisite: consent of de- 
partment chair. 

500-3 Advanced Plant Anatomy. The 
study of advanced topics in the anatomy of 
seed plants. Emphasis is on trends in and 
adaptive nature of evolutionary modifications 
of anatomical features and the application of 
anatomical data to plant systematics. Two 
lectures and one laboratory per week. Prereq- 
uisite: 400 and 421 or equivalent. 
501-4 (2,2) Research Transmission Elec- 
tron Microscopy. (Same as Science 501a,b.) 
502-4 (2,2) Research Scanning Electron 
Microscopy. (Same as Science 502a, b.) 
503-10 (5,5) Advanced Angiosperm Ta- 
xonomy. Systematic treatment of every fami- 
ly of flowering plants in the world. Must be 
taken in sequence. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

524-2 Advanced Plant Genetics. A consid- 
eration of incompatibility systems, paramuta- 
tion, cytoplasmic inheritance, developmental 
genetics, and other genetic topics as they occur 
in higher plants. Prerequisite: BIOL 305 or 
equivalent. 

525-3 Cytology. (Same as Zoology 525.) An 
analysis of the subcellular and cytochemical 
organization of the cell. Structural-functional 
aspects of organelles, membranes, and other 
cellular components, their relationship to the 
metabolic nucleus, substructural organization 
of hereditary materials, and subcellular 



aspects of mitosis and meiosis are emphasized. 
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. 
526-4 Cytogenetics. A study of structure, 
transmission, and mutation of nuclear and cy- 
toplasmic genetic elements, with emphasis on 
the utilization of structural changes in chro- 
mosomes and of changes in chromosome num- 
ber in theoretical and applied genetics. Two 
lectures and two laboratories per week. Pre- 
requisite: BIOL 305 and 306, or equivalent. 
532-3 Embryogenesis and Organography 
of Plants. A study of the developmental 
anatomy and comparative morphology of em- 
bryophytes, with emphasis on analysis of 
homologous versus analogous structure. In 
particular, the following aspects of organ de- 
velopment will be considered: embryological 
origin, cellular pattern of formation, cyto- 
chemical and histological characterization, 
and diversification in form. Laboratory will 
allow students to observe the organographic 
features discussed. Prerequisite: 320, 400, or 
consent of instructor. 

533-3 Plant Growth and Morphogensis. A 
study of the role of the environmental vari- 
ables (light, temperature, etc.) and phytohor- 
mones in the growth and morphogensis of in- 
tact plants and tissue cultures. The theories of 
plant organogensis and the synthesis, translo- 
cation, regulation, and mode of action of the 
maj or classes of phy tohormones will be treated 
in light of the most recent literature. Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite: 320 or consent 
of instructor. 

534-2 Techniques in Studies of Plant 
Growth and Development. Instruction in 
laboratory techniques used in the study of the 
role of environment and natural plant growth 
substances in plant morphogensis. Two two- 
hour laboratories per week. Prerequisite: 320 or 
consent of instructor. 

535-2 Energetics of Aquatic Ecosystems. 
Energy flows in aquatic habitats; photo- 
synthesis and respiration rate determinations 
under natural and laboratory conditions; de- 
termination of dominant genera in the com- 
munities; daily and annual energy budgets; 
factors influencing utilization of light by biotic 
systems; influence of daily and annual energy 
budgets on stratification on current systems, 
and on seasonal succession in the community. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
542-2 Biosystematics. An examination of 
species concepts and factors affecting the 
formation of species. Evidence from the fields 
of ecology, cytotaxonomy, genetics, and 
numerical taxonomy are discussed as well as 
the phenomena of hybridization, polyploidy, 
and apomixis. Two lecture and two laboratory 
hours per week. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

543-2 Tree Growth. Physiological aspects of 
tree growth and development. Phases of the life 
cycle from germination to seed production will 
be analyzed for effects of light, temperature, 
moisture, nutrients, mycorrhiza, wind, air 
pollution, and other factors. Two lectures per 
week. Prerequisite: 320 or 443 or FOR 331 or 
equivalent. 
551-3 Upland Flora. The taxonomy, ecolo- 



236 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



gy, and distribution of the natural vegetation 
in and around upland habitats of the Missis- 
sippi Basin. Prerequisite: 304 or GE-A 303 or 
consent of instructor. 

552-3 Lowland Flora. The taxonomy, ecolo- 
gy, and distribution of the natural vegetation 
in and around aquatic and lowland habitats of 
the Mississippi Basin. Prerequisite: 304 or GE- 
A 303 or consent of instructor. 
570-2 to 3 Graduate Readings in Botany. 
A course of individually assigned readings in 
botanical literature. Every semester. Prerequi- 
site: consent of instructor. Graded S/ U only. 
580-1 to 6 (1 per semester) Seminar. One 
hour discussion of current topics in biology. 
Every semester. Graded S/ U only. 
584-3 Advanced Palynology. (See Geology 
584.) 

585-2 to 6 (2 per semester) Advanced 
Topics in Systematics. A series of systemat- 
ic topics related to research techniques: (a) bo- 
tanical nomenclature; (b) botanical Latin; (c) 
botanical keys and descriptions. 
589-1 to 12 (1 per topic per semester) 
Seminars in Botany. Studies of current and 
historical research and literature in various 
topic areas of botany: (a) ecology; (b) bryology; 
(c) paleobotany; (d) anatomy; (e) systematics; 
(f) phycology; (g) mycology; (h) pathology; (i) 
physiology; (j) morphology. Graded S/U only. 
590-1 to 3 Introduction to Research. Gen- 
eral introduction to research techniques. 
Techniques to be determined by instructor and 
students. Every semester. Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. Graded S/ U only. 
591-2 to 9 Research. Assignments involv- 
ing research and individual problems, (a) 
anatomy; (b) bryology; (c) ecology; (d) mor- 
phology; (e) mycology; (f) paleobotany; (g) pa- 
thology; (h) photography; (i) phycology; (j) 
physiology; (k) systematics. Master's students 
may use this for their research for their thesis. 
Every semester. Prerequisite:consent of in- 
structor. Graded S/U only. 
599-2 to 9 Thesis. Course to be taken in the 
preparation of the master's thesis. Every se- 
mester. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
Graded S/ U only. 

600-1 to 36 (1 to 12 per semester) Disser- 
tation. Course to be taken in the research for 
and in writing of the doctoral dissertation. 
Every semester. Prerequisite: consent of in- 
structor. Graded S/ U only. 
601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/U or DEF only. 



Business Administration 

Students desiring to enroll in these courses 



must be admitted to the Master of 
Business Administration, Master of 
Accountancy, or Doctor of Business 
Administration degree program or have 
permission of the associate dean for 
graduate study in business 
administration or accountancy. 

410-3 Financial Accounting Concepts. 

Basic concepts, principles, and techniques 
used in the generation of accounting data for 
financial statement preparation and interpre- 
tation. Asset, liability, and equity valuations 
and income determination is stressed. Prereq- 
uisite: enrollment in M.B.A. program or con- 
sent of department; M.B.A. program "comput- 
er ability" foundation requirement met. 
430-3 Business Finance. An introductory 
course combining both a description of the 
structure of business financing and an analy- 
sis of functional finance from a managerial 
viewpoint. Prerequisite: enrollment in M.B.A. 
program or consent of department; 410, EPSY 
506, and M.B.A. program "computer ability" 
foundation requirement met, or equivalent. 
440-3 The Management Process. Analysis 
of management theories and the adminis- 
trative process. Specific managerial activities 
are analyzed and discussed. Functional rela- 
tionships in administered organizations are 
explored. Prerequisite: enrollment in M.B.A. 
program or consent of department. 
450-3 Introduction to Marketing Con- 
cepts. An overview of the role of marketing 
within an economic system and of the major 
marketing activities and decisions within an 
organization. Emphasis is on developing an 
understanding of the marketing process. Pre- 
requisite: enrollment in M.B.A. program or 
consent of department. 

451-3 Methods of Quantitative Analysis. 
(Same as Mathematics 457.) 
452-3 Operations Research. A survey of 
operations research techniques with emphasis 
on problem formulation, model building, and 
model solution. Topics include mathematical 
programming, waiting-line models, simula- 
tion, and decision theory. Prerequisite: enroll- 
ment in M.B.A. program or consent of depart- 
ment; 451, EPSY 506, and M.B.A. program 
"computer ability" foundation requirement 
met, or equivalent. 

470-3 Legal and Social Environment. An 
overview of the legal, social, and ethical di- 
mensions which influence business with par- 
ticular attention to the role of law as a control 
factor of society in the business world. Prereq- 
uisite: enrollment in M.B.A. program or con- 
sent of department. 

500-3 Research Applications in Business 
and Organizations. The analysis of actual 
problems in research: project design, data col- 
lection, analysis, interpretation, dissemina- 
tion, and application in business and organi- 
zational settings. This includes an under- 
standing of the proper utilization of appropriate 
research statistics and involves use of the 
computer for problem solving. Three lecture 
and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequi- 
site: enrollment in M.B.A. program or consent 



Course Descriptions 



Business Administration / 237 



of department; M.B.A. program foundation. 
502-3 Business in our Capitalistic Socie- 
ty. Study of the external environment in which 
business in America operates; social, political, 
legal, and ethical dimension, interrelation- 
ships, and requirements. Prerequisite: enroll- 
ment in M.B.A. program or consent of depart- 
ment; all M.B.A. program foundation. 
510-3 Managerial Accounting and Con- 
trol Concepts. Basic cost concepts, meas- 
ures, methods, and systems of internal ac- 
counting useful for managerial planning, 
implementation, control, and performance 
evaluation. Includes cost analysis relevant for 
nonroutine decision-making. Prerequisite: en- 
rollment in M.B.A. program or consent of 
department; 410, and M.B.A. program "com- 
puter ability" foundation requirement met, or 
equivalent. 

513-3 Accounting Concepts in Business 
Organizations. Accounting theory and prac- 
tice as it applies to business and other organi- 
zations. Emphasis is on current problem areas 
in accounting and on research methods being 
used to resolve these problems. Prerequisite: 
enrollment in the D.B. A. program or consent of 
department. 

519-3 Seminar in Accounting. Discussion 
of current accounting theories, principles, 
standards, and problems. Prerequisite: enroll- 
ment in M.B.A. program or consent of 
department. 

520-3 Production/Operations Manage- 
ment. A survey of the design, operation, and 
control of systems that produce goods and ser- 
vices. Topics include forecasting, production 
planning, facility location and layout, inven- 
tory management, scheduling, and quality 
control. Prerequisite: enrollment in M.B.A. 
program or consent of department; 452 or 
equivalent. 

521-3 Business Conditions Analysis. Em- 
phasis is given to macro-economic theory as it 
affects economic forecasting. Particular em- 
phasis is given to GNP forecasting models, 
industry forecasts, and forecasting for the 
firm. Prerequisite: enrollment in M.B.A. pro- 
gram or consent of department; 430 or 
equivalent. 

526-3 Managerial Economics. Develops 
conceptual framework for business decision 
making with emphasis on demand, costs, pric- 
es, and profits. Prerequisite: enrollment in 
M.B.A. program or consent of department. 
530-3 Financial Management. A study of 
financial principles and practices with special 
emphasis on their relation to managerial plan- 
ning and control. Prerequisite: enrollment in 
M.B.A. program or consent of department; 430, 
510, and either 526 or ECON 441, and 440, or 
equivalent. 

531-3 Advanced Financial Management. 
An evaluation of selected financial policies 
connected with the acquisition and disposition 
of funds by the firm. An emphasis is placed on 
quantitative solutions to these problems. Pre- 
requisite: enrollment in M.B.A. program or 
consent of department; 430 or equivalent. 
532-3 Financial Institutions and Mar- 
kets. The principal financial institutions and 



markets will be studied in relation to their con- 
tribution to the efficient operation of the indi- 
vidual enterprise and the total company. Pre- 
requisite: enrollment in M.B.A. program or 
consent of department; 430 or equivalent. 
533-3 Investment Concepts. A study of 
fixed return and variable return securities, in- 
vestment services, industry and issue analysis, 
empirical studies of groups and individual 
stock price movements. Prerequisite: enroll- 
ment in M.B.A. program or consent of depart- 
ment; 430 or equivalent. 
534-3 Financial Decision Making. Study 
of the scope and nature of advanced financial 
decision making and the application of quan- 
titative tools and techniques to decisions relat- 
ing to working capital, fixed assets, cost of 
capital, value of the firm, and financial struc- 
ture. Prerequisite: enrollment in the D.B. A. 
program or consent of department. 
536-3 Advanced Financial Analysis. Deals 
with examination of classical and various 
modern treatments of investment, valuation, 
cost of capital, and capital structure. Portfolio, 
state-preference, capital markets, options pric- 
ing, mergers, and exchange rate theories are 
explored. Prerequisite: enrollment in M.B.A. or 
D.B. A. program or consent of department; 430 
or equivalent. 

539-1 to 15 Seminar in Finance. A series of 
doctoral seminars on theoretical and empirical 
issues in finance. Sections (a) through (d) may 
be taken only once. Section (e) may be repeated 
as topics vary, (a) Corporate financial theory. 
(b) Financial institutions and markets, (c) 
Portfolio theory and speculative markets, (d) 
International financial theory, (e) Selected 
topics. Prerequisite: enrollment in D.B.A. pro- 
gram or consent of department. 
540-3 Managerial and Organization Be- 
havior. Case analyses of human problems in 
the business organization. Application of find- 
ings of behavioral science research to organi- 
zation problems. Development of direction and 
leadership skills. Prerequisite: enrollment in 
M.B.A. program or consent of department; 440 
or equivalent. 

541-3 Operations Research II. Continua- 
tion of the survey of topics and approach taken 
in 452. Problem formulation; model building 
and elementary mastery of state-of-the-arts so- 
lution techniques are emphasized. Topics in- 
clude integer programming, traveling sales 
representative problems, probabilistic pro- 
gramming, queuing, simulation and inventory 
theory. Prerequisite: enrollment in M.B.A. pro- 
gram or consent of department; 452 or 
equivalent. 

543-3 Personnel Management. An over- 
view of the field of personnel administration, 
based on a review of the relevant literature and 
on practice in simulations of problems 
typically encountered in the field. Prerequisite: 
enrollment in M.B.A. program or consent of 
department; 440 or equivalent. 
544-3 Advanced Production Planning 
and Inventory Management. An in-depth 
study of analytical models and techniques for 
production planning, scheduling, and inven- 
tory management. Management science tech- 



238 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



niques utilized include classical optimization, 
mathematical programming, and simulation. 
Prerequisite: enrollment in M.B.A. program or 
consent of department; 520 or equivalent. 
545-3 Organization of Complex Systems. 
Analysis of organizations as complex systems. 
Major emphasis is placed on the latest research 
developments which integrate micro and 
macro perspectives of organizations. Ad- 
ditional emphasis is placed on a top manage- 
ment perspective of the organization. Prereq- 
uisite:enrollment in the D.B.A. program or 
consent of department. 

546-3 Leadership and Managerial Be- 
havior. This course will concentrate on leader 
and manager behavior at middle and upper 
organizational levels. Emphasis will be placed 
on leader and manager effectiveness and the 
factors that impact effectiveness. Prerequi- 
site:enrollment in M.B.A. program or consent 
of department; 540 or equivalent. 
549-3 Seminar in Administration. Study 
of contemporary administrative theory and 
practice with focus on certain special topics, 
new or current trends, and research. Individual 
and group projects are emphasized. Specific 
topics to be covered will be determined by the 
instructor in consultation with students. Pre- 
requisite: enrollment in M.B.A. program or 
consent of department. 

550-3 Marketing Management. A mana- 
gerial approach to the study of marketing. 
Emphasis is on the nature and scope of the 
marketing manager's responsibilities and on 
marketing decision making. Prerequisite: en- 
rollment in M.B.A. program or consent of de- 
partment; 450 or equivalent. 
551-3 Product Strategy and Manage- 
ment. Designed to treat product management 
and its relationships with business policies 
and procedures; the development of multipro- 
duct strategies, means of developing such 
strategies, and the problems and methods of 
commercialization. Prerequisite: enrollment in 
M.B.A. program or consent of department; 550 
or equivalent. 

552-3 Research Methodology for Mar- 
keting. The study of theory, method, and pro- 
cedure for quantitative and qualitative analy- 
sis of primary and secondary marketing data. 
Emphasis is placed on application of specific 
research tools to the process of formulating 
and testing research hypotheses. Prerequisite: 
enrollment in D.B.A. program or consent of 
department. 

553-3 Multinational Marketing Manage- 
ment. The basic elements of marketing man- 
agement are identified in the setting of a global 
business environment. Emphasis is given to 
variables in the international markets that ef- 
fect strategic business planning such as cul- 
tural, ethical, political, and economic influenc- 
es. The course focuses on current trends in the 
marketing practices of organization. Prerequi- 
site: enrollment in the M.B.A. program or con- 
sent of department, 550 and MKTG 435 or 
equivalent. 

554-3 Strategic Issues in Marketing and 
Society. A critical view of the social, political, 
legal, and economic impact of strategic mar- 



keting decision making. Emphasis is on the 
ethical and moral ramifications of marketing 
activities in a complex social environment. 
Prerequisite: enrollment in M.B.A. program or 
consent of department. 

555-3 Seminar in Consumer Behavior. 
Emphasis on the theories and research relat- 
ing behavioral science to the discipline of mar- 
keting. Development of sophisticated compre- 
hension of the consumption process is under- 
taken. Prerequisite: enrollment in D.B.A. 
program or consent of department. 
556-3 Seminar in Marketing Strategy. 
Long run market opportunities are identified 
and evaluated. Methods of implementation 
and execution affecting the relationship of 
strategic marketing planning to the allocation 
decisions of top management are emphasized. 
The orientation is toward theoretical develop- 
ment to provide a base for continuing research 
in the field. Prerequisite: enrollment in D.B.A. 
program or consent of department. 
557-3 Seminar in Marketing Theory. The 
philosophical bases underlying the develop- 
ment of theory in marketing. The process of 
development of marketing ideations through 
research is emphasized. Prerequisite: enroll- 
ment in the D.B.A. program or consent of 
department. 

558-3 Promotional Strategy and Man- 
agement. The study of the elements of the 
promotional mix including advertising, per- 
sonal selling, sales promotion, and publicity, 
and how they apply in the profit and not-for- 
profit sectors of the market place. Prerequisite: 
enrollment in the M.B.A. program or consent 
of department; 550 or equivalent. 
559-3 Seminar in Marketing. Study of cur- 
rent issues and problems in marketing and an 
evaluation of contemporary marketing theory 
and practice. Prerequisite: enrollment in 
M.B.A. program or consent of department; 450 
or equivalent. 

560-3 Management Information Systems. 
A survey of information system design, 
analysis, and operations. Topics include sys- 
tems concepts, systems analysis and design, 
database management, software and hard- 
ware concepts, decision support systems, dis- 
tributed processing and telecommunications, 
and information systems planning. Computer 
application will be emphasized. Prerequisite: 
enrollment in M.B.A. program or consent of 
department; 452 or equivalent. 
571-3 Mission and Domain Analysis. A 
review of the factors influencing how manag- 
ers formulate or change an organization's mis- 
sion and domain. Topics include goal formula- 
tion, mission and scope definition, defining 
relevant environments, and strategic evalua- 
tion as inputs to the process of defining the 
long-range roles of primate and public organi- 
zations in the broader socio-economic system. 
Prerequisite: enrollment in M.B.A. or D.B.A. 
program or consent of department; 450 or 
equivalent. 

572-3 Forecasting and Decision-Making 
Models. An analytic approach to (a) forecast- 
ing conditions that will impact on the organi- 
zation and (b) evaluating the possible outcome 



Course Descriptions 



Business Administration / 239 



of alternative actions. Particular emphasis is 
given to forecasting models, decision theory, 
simulation and formal planning models. Pre- 
requisite: enrollment in M.B.A. or U.B.A. pro- 
gram or consent of department; EPSY 506 or 
equivalent. 

573-3 Planning Systems and Strategic 
Decisions. A critical review of theory and re- 
search on the structure, content, and process of 
strategic decisions. The design and imple- 
mentation of planning systems also is empha- 
sized. Prerequisite: enrollment in M.B.A. or 
D.B.A. program or consent of department. 
574-3 Advanced Research Methods in 
Business Administration. A capstone re- 
search course in business administration that 
exposes the student to a full range of research 
experiences. Emphasis is on integrating learn- 
ing and creative thinking in the execution of 
the research process. Prerequisite: enrollment 
in D.B.A. program. 

580-3 International Business Operations. 
Course is designed to provide an overview of 
the international dimension of a firm's 
operations. Alternative methods for reaching 
foreign markets, operational adjustments and 
specific problems in dealing with foreign envi- 
ronments, are the principal areas of considera- 
tion. Prerequisite: enrollment in M.B.A. pro- 
gram or consent of department; all M.B.A. 
program foundation. 

591-3 Independent Study. Directed inde- 
pendent study in selected areas of business 
administration. Prerequisite: enrollment in 
M.B.A. program, or D.B.A. program, or con- 
sent of department; consent of instructor. 
598-3 Business Policies. Study of the devel- 
opment and evaluation of business strategies 
and policies as they relate to the overall per- 
formance of the firm within its environment. 
Knowledge of the functional areas of adminis- 
tration, available business data, and analyt- 
ical tools will be utilized in solving comprehen- 
sive business cases and simulation games. 
Prerequisite: enrollment for past semester in 
M.B.A. program. 

599-3 to 6 Thesis. Prerequisite: enrollment in 
M.B.A. program or consent of department; 
consent of instructor. 

600-1 to 24 (1 to 16 per semester) Disser- 
tation. Minimum of 24 hours to be earned for 
the Doctor of Business Administration degree. 
Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy for 
the D.B.A. program. 

601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/U or DEF only. 

Accountancy 

(See course listing under School of 
Accountancy.) 



Finance 

There is no graduate program offered 
through the Department of Finance. 
Four-hundred-level courses may be taken 
for graduate credit unless otherwise 
indicated in the course description. 
432-3 Options and Future Markets. Study 
of modern concepts and issues in financial op- 
tions and future markets. Emphasis on risk 
management in financial institutions, and ap- 
plications in corporate finance and funds 
management. Not for graduate credit. Prereq- 
uisite: 331, and 361 or concurrent. 
433-3 Portfolio Theory and Manage- 
ment. Examination of modern concepts relat- 
ing to management of security portfolios. Top- 
ics include security analysis, Markowitz 
Portfolio Theory, efficient market hypothesis, 
portfolio performance measurement, risk, and 
portfolio construction. Prerequisite: 331, 361, or 
concurrent enrollment. 

449-3 Management of Financial Institu- 
tions. Principal policies and problems which 
confront management. Emphasis on liquidity, 
loans, investments, deposits, capital funds, fi- 
nancial statements, organization structure, 
operations, personnel, cost analysis, and pub- 
lic relations. Not for graduate credit. Prerequi- 
site: 330 and 341. 

462-3 Working Capital Management. 
Short-term budgeting and forecasting tech- 
niques used in business; alternative approach- 
es to working capital management including 
consideration of certainty, risk, and uncer- 
tainty; theory and applications in manage- 
ment of cash, marketable securities, accounts 
receivables, inventory, banking relationships, 
and short-term sources of funds. Prerequisite: 
361 or concurrent enrollment. 
463-3 Forecasting and Capital Budget- 
ing. Long-term forecasting techniques used in 
business; alternative approaches to capital 
structure decisions, cost of capital measure- 
ment, and performance measurement for invest- 
ment decisions including mergers and leasing; 
explicit consideration of certainty, risk, and 
uncertainty in investment analysis; theory 
and applications in private and public sectors. 
Prerequisite: 361 or concurrent enrollment. 
464-3 International Financial Manage- 
ment. Financial behavior of multinational 
firms. Emphasis on the modifications of con- 
ventional financial models to incorporate 
uniquely foreign variables. Prerequisite: 361 or 
concurrent enrollment. 

469-3 Managerial Financial Policy. De- 
velopment of financial strategies and policies 
based on an evaluation of alternative ap- 
proaches. Emphasis upon application of fi- 
nancial concepts and techniques to real-life 
situations. Not for graduate credit. Prerequi- 
site: 361. 

480-3 Problems in Labor Law. Social, eco- 
nomic, and legal evaluations of recent labor 
problems, court decisions, and legislation. 
Concern is on long-run legislative impact on 
manpower planning, dispute settlement, and 
utilization of employment resources. 



240 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



49 1 - 1 to 6 Internship in Finance. Designed 
to provide an opportunity to relate certain 
types of work experience to the student's 
academic program and objectives. Approved 
internship assignments with cooperating com- 
panies in the fields of finance are coordinated 
by a faculty member. Not repeatable for credit. 
Not for graduate credit. Prerequisite: consent 
of department chair and outstanding record in 
finance. Mandatory Pass/ Fail. 
495- 1 to 6 Reading in Finance. Readings in 
classical and current writing on selected topics 
in various areas in the field of finance not 
available through regularly scheduled courses. 
Not for graduate credit. Prerequisite: consent 
of department chair and outstanding record in 
finance. Mandatory Pass/ Fail. 

Management 

There is no graduate program offered 
through the Department of Management. 
Four-hundred-level courses in this 
department may be taken for graduate 
credit unless otherwise indicated in the 
course description. 

431-3 Organizational Design and Struc- 
ture. The study of modern theories of complex 
organizations. Particular emphasis is placed 
on open-systems perspectives of administra- 
tive theory and the adaptation of the organiza- 
tion to a changing environment. Prerequisite: 
341 and junior standing or consent of depart- 
ment, and must be a business (not prebusiness) 
major. 

453-3 Advanced Quantitative Models for 
Systems Analysis. A continuation of 352. 
Mathematical model building in organizations 
and solution techniques commonly used to 
solve such models. An extension of topics in 
deterministic and probabilistic modeling in- 
troduced in 352. Prerequisite:352, junior stand- 
ing or consent of department, and must be a 
business (not prebusiness) major. 
456-3 Building Decision Support Sys- 
tems. Investigation of selected systems and 
computer based methods for aiding manage- 
ment decision-making. Topics include systems 
analysis applications, simulation, and decision 
models. Prerequisite: 345, 352, and junior 
standing or consent of department, and must 
be a business (not prebusiness) major. 
471-3 Seminar in Entrepreneurship. In- 
vestigation of selected special or advanced 
topics in seminar format. Topics may include, 
but are not limited to: entrepreneurship, small 
business analysis, or topics related to the own- 
ership and management of a business. Activi- 
ties will include library and field research, data 
analysis, report writing, and active par- 
ticipation in seminar presentations and dis- 
cussions. This course is designed particularly 
for the student who has completed the three 
small business courses numbered 350 and has 
discussed specific small business or entrepre- 
neural objectives with the instructor prior to 
the course. Prerequisite: consent of depart- 
ment, and must be a business (not prebusiness) 
major. 



474-3 Management's Responsibility in 
Society. Analysis of the cultural, social, polit- 
ical, economic, and immediate environment of 
the organization. Particular emphasis is given 
to the manner in which the manager adapts to 
and is influenced by the environment and its 
conflicting demands. Prerequisite: senior 
standing or consent of department, and must 
be a business (not prebusiness) major. 
481-3 Strategic Management and Policy. 
Development of organizational strategies and 
policies within environmental and resource 
limitations. Emphasis upon the application 
and integration of basic principles from all 
areas of business by case problem analysis, 
simulation exercises, and group participation. 
Not for graduate credit. Prerequisite: senior 
standing, 304, 318, FIN 330, MKTG 304, or 
equivalent, and must be a business (not prebu- 
siness) major. 

483-3 Advanced Production Operations 
Management. In-depth study of analytical 
planning, scheduling, and control theory and 
techniques in the context of production/opera- 
tions systems. Case exercises will be utilized to 
illustrate production management problems 
and methods. Prerequisite: 318, 352, junior 
standing or consent of department, and must 
be a business (not prebusiness) major. 
485-3 Organizational Change and Devel- 
opment. Analysis of problems in personnel 
management with emphasis on current trends 
and techniques. Case problems, special re- 
ports, and experiential approaches are used as 
a basis for examining ways of using an organi- 
zation's human resources to best advantage. 
Prerequisite: 341, junior standing or consent of 
department, and must be a business (not pre- 
business) major. 

489-6 (3,3) Seminar. Investigation of select- 
ed special or advanced topics in seminar for- 
mat. Topics may include, but are not limited 
to:management responsibility in society, wage 
and salary administration, health services 
administration, data processing management, 
current issues in management, etc., (a) 
management, (b) decision sciences. May be 
taken singly; a student normally takes only 
one of the two options. Prerequisite: consent of 
department, and must be a business (not pre- 
business) major. 

491-1 to 6 Independent Study. Utilizes 
special faculty resources to enable individual- 
ly, the exploration of an advanced area of 
study through research by means of data anal- 
ysis and/or literature search. Prerequisite: 
consent of department, and must be a business 
(not prebusiness) major. 

Marketing 

There is no graduate program offered 
through the Department of Marketing. 
Four-hundred-level courses may be taken 
for graduate credit unless otherwise 
indicated in the course description. 
401-3 Retail Management. Designed to 
present the basic principles in decision areas 
such as location, layout, organization, person- 



Course Descriptions 



Business Administration / 241 



nel, merchandise control, sales promotion, ad- 
vertising, etc. Retail merchandising through a 
managerial perspective. Prerequisite: 304 and 
junior standing or higher, and must be a busi- 
ness (not prebusiness) major or consent of 
department. 

435-3 International Marketing. Analysis 
of international operations. Emphasis on the 
factors influencing marketing to and within 
foreign countries and the alternative methods 
of operations open to international firms. Pre- 
requisite: 304 and junior standing or higher, 
and must be a business (not prebusiness) major 
or consent of department. 
438-3 Sales Management. Analysis of the 
management of the sales effort within the 
marketing system. Philosophies, concepts, and 
judgement criteria of the sales function in 
relationship to the total marketing program. 
Prerequisite: 304 and MGT 304 or 301 and jun- 
ior standing or higher, and must be a business 
(not prebusiness) major or consent of 
department. 

439-3 Industrial Marketing. Analysis of 
decision criteria related to the marketing of 
industrial products. Emphasis on program de- 
velopment, formulation of a marketing mix, 
and the behavioral relationships in the modern 
industrial organization. Prerequisite: 304 and 
junior standing or higher, and must be a busi- 
ness (not prebusiness) major or consent of 
department. 

452-3 Physical Distribution Manage- 
ment. Integration of physical distribution ac- 
tivities of the firm into a system. Transporta- 
tion and location as elements of the system. 
Inventories and service as constraints upon 
the system. Planning, operation, organization, 
and management of the system. Prerequisite: 
304 and junior standing or higher, or consent of 
department, and must be a business (not 
prebusiness) major. 

463-3 Advertising Management. Adver- 
tising from the viewpoint of business manage- 
ment. Develops an understanding of the role of 
advertising under various conditions. Prob- 
lems of integrating advertising strategy into 
the firm's total marketing program. Prerequi- 
site: 304 and 363 and junior standing or higher 
and must be a business (not prebusiness) major 
or consent of department. 
493-3 Marketing Policies. A comprehen- 
sive and integrative view of marketing policy 
formulation. Marketing decisions analyzed 
and discussed. Prerequisite: 329, 363, and 390 
(not more than one to be taken concurrently) 
and junior standing or higher and must be a 
business (not prebusiness) major or consent of 
department. 

499-1 to 6 (1 to 3, 1 to 3) Marketing 
Insights. Provides the student an opportu- 
nity to participate in an internship pro- 
gram, independent study, or seminar co- 
inciding with areas of interest. May be 
repeated for credit only when topics vary. Pre- 
requisite: junior standing or higher, approval 
of the instructor and the department chair in 
the semester prior to enrollment and must be a 
business (not prebusiness) major or consent of 
department. 



Chemistry and 
Biochemistry 

All laboratory courses in chemistry and 
biochemistry require the student to 
purchase either special notebooks or 
workbooks, costing within the range of 
$1.50 to $8.50. All students enrolled in a 
chemistry class that includes a laboratory 
session will be assessed a breakage charge 
for all glassware broken. This policy will 
apply to undergraduate and graduate 
students. 

411-3 Intermediate Inorganic Chemis- 
try. Fundamentals of inorganic chemistry, 
covering bonding and structure, coordination 
compounds, and the chemistry of some famil- 
iar and less familiar elements. Three lectures 
per week. Prerequisite: 465a or concurrent 
enrollment. 

416-3 X-Ray Crystallography. (See Geolo 
gy 416.) Prerequisite: 224 and 225, or 222b, one 
year of college physics and MATH 150. 
431-4 Environmental Analytical Chem- 
istry. Practical applications of common in- 
strumental and wet methods to the determina- 
tions of chemical substances in common 
natural and commercial materials. Techniques 
will include titrimetry; quantitative transfer of 
liquids and solids; gas, thin-layer and ion- 
exchange chromatography; atomic absorp- 
tion; flame photometry; ion selective electrode 
potentiometry; and spectrophotometry. The 
course is intended for senior-level and graduate 
students in disciplines other than chemistry 
who desire to know the practical aspects of 
laboratory measurements. The course is not 
applicable to a major in chemistry. One lecture, 
one laboratory-lecture, and two threehour 
laboratories per week. Prerequisite: 222a,b or 
nine hours of chemistry excluding general edu- 
cation courses. 

434-4 Instrumental Analytical Chemis- 
try. Theory and practice of modern instru- 
mental measurements, including emission and 
absorption spectroscopic, electroanalytical, 
and chromatographic methods, and an in- 
troduction to applied electronics. Two lectures 
and two three-hour laboratories per week for 
four credit hours. Enrollment for two credit 
hours is restricted to graduate students in the 
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 
advised to take instrumental analysis. Prereq- 
uisite: one semester of physical chemistry or 
concurrent enrollment in 465a. 
436-3 Analytical Separations and Analy- 
ses. A study of the analyses of complex ma- 
terials, usually inorganic with emphasis on 
separations, functional-group chemical analy- 
ses, and instrumental applications. Two lec- 
tures and one three-hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite: 226 and one semester of physical 
chemistry which may be taken concurrently. 
444-3 Intermediate Organic Chemistry. 
Intended for incoming graduate students and 



242 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



advanced preprofessional students. Provides 
students with intermediate level coverage of 
organic reactions, mechanisms, syntheses, 
and structure determination. Emphasis will be 
on problem solving, including structure elu- 
cidation, road map sequences, multistep syn- 
thetic sequences, and elucidation of reaction 
mechanisms including those with stereochem- 
istry and multiple sites of reactivity. Prerequi- 
site: 344, 346, or equivalent, and consent of 
instructor. 

446-4 Qualitative Organic Analysis. A 
systematic study of the separation and identi- 
fication of organic compounds. Two lectures 
and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
site: 226 and either 346 and 349 or consent of 
instructor. 

451-6 (3,3) Biochemistry, (a) Chemistry and 
function of amino acids, proteins, and en- 
zymes; enzyme kinetics; chemistry, function, 
and metabolism of carbohydrates; citric acid 
cycle; electron transport and oxidative phos- 
phorylation, (b) Chemistry, function, and me- 
tabolism of lipids; nitrogen metabolism; nu- 
cleic acid and protein biosynthesis; metabolic 
regulation. Three lectures per week. Must be 
taken in a, b sequence. Prerequisite: one year of 
organic chemistry. 

455-4 Biochemistry Laboratory. Modern 
biochemical laboratory techniques for isola- 
tion, purification, and characterization of con- 
stituents of living cells and for investigations 
of pathways, kinetics, energetics, and regula- 
tory mechanisms related to metabolism and 
enzymic activity. One lecture and eight hours 
of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 451a and 
226 or concurrent enrollment; graduate stand- 
ing in the Department of Chemistry and Bio- 
chemistry or consent of the instructor. 
465-9 (3,3,3) Physical Chemistry. A three 
semester sequence of physical chemistry. 
Three lectures per week, (a) Classical thermo- 
dynamics, its applications, and reaction kinet- 
ics. Prerequisite: MATH 250. (b) Quantum 
chemistry and group theory. Prerequisite: 
MATH 305 or MATH 221. (c) Spectroscopy and 
statistical mechanics. Prerequisite: 465b. To be 
taken in a,b,c sequence. 

466-2 (1,1) Physical Chemistry Labora- 
tory. A two semester laboratory sequence for 
CHEM 465. One three hour laboratory per 
week per semester, (a) Experiments relating to 
topics covered in CHEM 465a. Prerequisite: 
CHEM 465a. (b) Experiments relating to topics 
covered in CHEM 465b, c. Prerequisite: CHEM 
465b. 

471-2 Industrial Chemistry. A survey of 
modern industrial chemistry and an introduc- 
tion to chemical research processes. Two lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite: 346 and 347 or 349. 
489-1 to 3 Special Topics in Chemistry. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor and chair. 
490-2 Chemical Literature. A description of 
the various sources of chemical information 
and the techniques for carrying out literature 
searches. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite: 
346 and 347 or 349. 

491-2 History of Chemistry. The evolution 
of chemistry from ancient times until 1920. 
Two lectures per week. 



496-1 to 8 Undergraduate Research (Hon- 
ors). Introduction to independent research 
under the direction of a faculty member 
culminating in a written report. Not for gradu- 
ate credit. Prerequisite: a 3.0 grade point aver- 
age, five semesters of chemistry laboratory in- 
cluding one semester of physical chemistry, 
and consent of instructor and department 
chair. 

502-3 Molecular Orbital Theory. An intro- 
duction to molecular orbital theory. Applica- 
tions and limitations of various methods. 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:one year 
of undergraduate physical chemistry includ- 
ing quantum mechanics. 
511-6 (3,3) Advanced Inorganic Chemis- 
try, (a) Principles of group theory and their 
application to molecular structure, ligand field 
theory and its application and magnetic prop- 
erties of matter, (b) Energetics, kinetics, and 
mechanisms of inorganic systems. Prerequi- 
site: one year of physical chemistry, 411 or sat- 
isfactory completion of 500. 
519-1 to 9 (1 to 3 per semester) Advanced 
Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Metal ions 
in biological processes and other selected top- 
ics to be announced by the department. Maxi- 
mum credit nine semester hours. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. 

531-3 Theory of Chemical Analysis. The 
phenomena utilized in analytical chemistry 
with emphasis on separations, organic re- 
agents, and complex methods. Three lectures 
per week. Prerequisite: 436 or equivalent. 
532-3 Analytical Chemistry Instrumen- 
tation. Theories of design and methods of in- 
terfacing components of instruments with ap- 
plications to optimization of systems for 
determinations of chemicals in trace concentra- 
tions. Two lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory per week. Prerequisite: 434. 
535-3 Advanced Analytical Chemistry. 
Theory and applications of chromatography; 
statistics; uses of laboratory computers in 
chemical instrumentation and data evalua- 
tion. Three lectures per week. Lectures will oc- 
casionally be used for laboratory operations. 
Prerequisite: 434. 

539-1 to 9 (1 to 3 per semester) Advanced 
Topics in Analytical Chemistry. Selected 
topics of interest to practicing analytical che- 
mists such as microanalytical chemistry, 
functional-group chemical determinations, 
absorption spectroscopy, and electroanalytical 
chemistry. Maximum credit nine semester 
hours. Prerequisite: 434. 

541-3 Organic Structure and Reactivity. 
Structure and reactivity of organic com- 
pounds:steric, electronic, kinetic, and thermo- 
dynamic aspects. NMR, ESR, IR, and mass 
spectrometry in structure characterization. 
Prerequisite: master's degree in chemistry, or a 
grade of B or better in 446, or passing grade on 
the organic diagnostic examination. 
542-3 Mechanistic Organic Chemistry. 
Reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry. 
Orbital symmetry, photochemistry, and the 
chemistry of the common transient intermedi- 
ates. Prerequisite:master's degree in chemis- 
try, or a grade of B or better in 446, or passing 



Course Descriptions 



Chemistry and Biochemistry / 243 



grade on the organic chemistry diagnostic 
examination. 

543-3 Synthetic Organic Chemistry. Or- 
ganic synthesis:classical and modern meth- 
ods. Prerequisite:master's degree in chemistry, 
or a grade of B or better in 446, or 
passing grade on the organic chemistry 
diagnostic examination. 

549-1 to 9 (1 to 3 per semester) Advanced 
Topics in Organic Chemistry. Specialized 
topics in organic chemistry. The topic to be 
covered is announced by the department. 
Maximum credit nine semester hours. Prereq- 
uisite: 542. 

556-1 to 7 Advanced Biochemistry. A crit- 
ical treatment of the topics indicated below. A 
student may select any one, two, three, or all 
four topics for the indicated credit, (a) -2 Eur- 
kayotic molecular biology. Prerequisite: 451a,b 
or equivalent; MICRO 460 recommended, (b) -1 
Chemical data analysis. Data reduction and 
analysis with a laboratory microcomputer 
with examples from chemistry and bio- 
chemistry. Prerequisite: 451a,b or equivalent; 
MICRO 460 recommended, (c) -2 Chemistry 
and biochemistry of biological membranes. An 
advanced level introduction to the techniques 
used to study biological membranes including: 
electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, spec- 
troscopy, electrophysiological, and biochemi- 
cal. Topics will include the latest information 
from biophysics to molecular biology. Prereq- 
uisite: 556a,b. (d) -2 Biophysical methods. Pre- 
requisite: 556a,b,c. 

559-1 to 12 (1 to 3 per semester) Selected 
Topics in Biochemistry. Topic to be an- 
nounced by the department. Maximum credit 
twelve semester hours. Prerequisite: 451b. 
560-3 Introduction to Quantum Chemis- 
try. Basic principles and applications of 
quantum mechanics to chemistry. Topics in- 
clude operator and vector algebra, classical 
mechanics, angular momentum, approximate 
methods, hydrogen-like atoms, and molecular 
electronic structure. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite: one year of undergraduate phys- 
ical chemistry. 

562-6 (3,3) Advanced Molecular Spec- 
troscopy, (a) Theory of rotational and vibra- 
tional spectroscopy, electronic spectroscopy of 
molecules, (b) Magnetic resonance, general 
theory, spectral analysis, chemical shifts and 
coupling constants, exchange phenomena, 
Fourier Transform methods, 13C nuclear mag- 
netic resonance, electron paramagnetic reso- 
nance, and hyperfine interactions. Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite: 565 or consent of 
instructor. 

564-3 Statistical Thermodynamics. Prin- 
ciples of statistical mechanics and applica- 
tions to equilibrium and nonequilibrium sys- 
tems. Topics include ideal gases, monatomic 
crystals, lattice statistics, the cluster method, 
correlation functions, Brownian motion, the 
Boltzmann equation, and the Kubo-Green 
technique. Three lectures per week. Prerequi- 
site: 465a,b or consent of instructor. 
565-3 Group Theory. Applications of group 
theory to quantum mechanics and spectrosco- 



py. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: 
465a,b or consent of instructor. 
569-1 to 9 (1 to 3 per semester) Advanced 
Topics in Physical Chemistry. Topic to be 
announced by the department. Maximum 
credit nine semester hours. Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. 

594-2 to 3 Special Readings in Chemistry. 
Assigned library work in any of the six fields of 
chemistry with individual instruction by a 
staff member, (a) Analytical, (b) biochemistry, 
(c) inorganic, (d) organic, (e) physical, (f) 
history of chemistry. Maximum credit three 
hours. 

595-1 Advanced Seminar in Chemistry. 
Advanced level talks presented by graduate 
students, (a) Analytical, (b) biochemistry, (c) 
inorganic, (d) organic, and (e) physical 
chemistry. 

597-1 to 15 Professional Training. Ex- 
perience in teaching of chemistry, instrument 
operation and special research projects. One 
hour required each semester in residence. 
Graded S/U only. Prerequisite: graduate 
standing. 

598-1 to 50 (1 to 12 per semester) Re- 
search. Maximum credit 50 hours, except by 
permission of the student's graduate advisory 
committee. Graded S/U only. Prerequisite: 
consent of chair. 

599- 1 to 6 Thesis. Maximum credit six hours. 
Prerequisite: consent of chair. 
600-1 to 30 (1 to 12 per semester) Disser- 
tation-Doctoral. Requirement for Ph.D. 
degree, 24 hours. Maximum credit 30 hours, 
except by permission of the student's graduate 
advisory committee. Prerequisite: 598. 
601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/c/ori)£Fonly. 



Cinema and Photography 

Graduate work in the Department of 
Cinema and Photography is offered 
toward the Master of Fine Arts degree and 
the Master of Arts degree in public visual 
communications. Four-hundred-level 
courses in this department may be taken 
for graduate credit unless otherwise 
indicated in the course description. 

Students provide photographic 
materials for all cinema and photography 
production courses, students supply their 
own film, photographic paper, certain 
specialized chemicals, a fully adjustable 
35mm or 120 roll film camera, and $15 
additional cost for laboratory materials 
for each production course. In motion 



244 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



picture production courses, students 
provide their own film, processing, 
recording materials, and editing supplies. 
In courses which involve analysis and 
screening of a number of films, a cost of 
$10 per course for screenings will be 
required. 

401-3 Large Format Photography. Intro- 
duction to the aesthetics and techniques of 
large format (sheet film cameras) photography 
with emphasis on personal expression and 
commercial/professional applications. Stu- 
dents purchase texts and provide photographic 
materials and chemicals. A $15 cost for 
additional laboratory materials. Prerequisite: 
322 or concurrent enrollment and consent of 
department. 

402-3 Sensitometry. An advanced course 
dealing with the technical and visual applica- 
tions of the black and white process. Explores 
the zone system, density parameter system, 
and practical chemistry. Also deals with the 
visual application of these systems. Lab fee. 
Prerequisite: 320 and consent of department. 
404-3 Introduction to the Studio. Problems 
and possibilities in the aesthetics and tech- 
niques of studio photography: lighting, visual 
perception, environment, history, theory. Stu- 
dents purchase texts and provide photographic 
materials. A $15 laboratory fee. Prerequisite: 
320 and consent of department. 
405-3 Applied Photography I. Theory and 
practice of contemporary commercial/indus- 
trial photography. Students provide materials 
and may purchase texts. Lab fee. Prerequisite: 
322 and consent of department. 
406-3 Applied Photography II. Practice 
and ideas of advertising/illustrative and edi- 
torial photography. Students purchase ma- 
terials and may purchase props, texts, and 
equipment. Lab fee. Prerequisite: 405 and con- 
sent of department. 

407-3 Photography and the Mass Media. 
Exploration of the use, context, and meaning 
of photography in the mass media. The photo- 
graph as a communication tool will be evaluat- 
ed along with the role and responsibility of the 
photojournalist. Students will apply theoreti- 
cal concepts through group and individual as- 
signments. Students purchase texts and pro- 
vide photographic materials. A $15.00 labora- 
tory fee. Prerequisite: 320 and consent of 
instructor. 

408-3 Documentary Photography: Meth- 
od, Format, and Distribution. Exploration 
of the techniques, history, and contemporary 
context of documentary photography. Audi- 
ence, publication, and distribution of docu- 
mentary photographic projects will be ad- 
dressed. Each student will produce an indepth 
documentary photographic project. Students 
purchase texts and provide photographic ma- 
terials. A $15.00 laboratory fee. Prerequisite: 
332 and consent of department. 
420-3 Experimental Camera Tech- 
niques. Experimental approaches to the cre- 
ation of photographic images in the camera. 
Students purchase texts and provide photo- 
graphic materials and chemicals. A $15 cost 



for additional laboratory materials. Prerequi- 
site: 322 and consent of department. 
421-3 Experimental Darkroom Tech- 
niques. Experimental darkroom manipula- 
tions of the straight camera image. Students 
purchase texts and provide photographic ma- 
terials and chemicals. A $15 cost for additional 
laboratory materials. Prerequisite: 322 and 
consent of department. 

422-3 Advanced Color Photography. Ad- 
vanced study and production of color photo- 
graphs with emphasis on experimental tech- 
niques using Dye Transfer, Kwik Proof and 
other forms of photo-mechanical reproduction. 
Students purchase texts and provide photo- 
graphic materials and chemicals. A $15 cost 
for additional laboratory materials. Prerequi- 
site: 322 and consent of department. 
425-3 to 9 Studio Workshop. An intensive 
workshop focusing on current trends in pho- 
tography as a fine art. Topics offered have in- 
cluded landscape photography, architectural 
photography, imagemaking, introduction to 
the studio, among others. Students provide 
photographic materials and chemicals. A $15 
cost for additional laboratory materials. Pre- 
requisite: 322 and consent of department. 
426-3 Nonsilver Photography. An ad- 
vanced course in which the student will learn 
the basics of working with the hand-applied 
emulsions of cyanotype, vandyke brownprint- 
ing, and gum printing. Students provide ma- 
terials and chemicals. A $15 laboratory fee. 
Prerequisite: 322 and consent of department. 
449-3 Survey of Film History. Intensive 
study of major historical periods of the cinema, 
including technological developments, na- 
tional cinema movements, sociological and 
aesthetic determinations, and concerns of film 
historiography. Screening fee. It is strongly re- 
commended that C&P majors complete 349 
and 360 prior to taking 449. 
452-3 Film Planning and Scripting. The 
screenplay as a basis for production. Practice 
in preparing film plans, treatments, story- 
boards, and scripts. Examination of the film 
industry. Prerequisite: 355 or consent of 
department. 

454-3 Animated Film Production. Practi- 
cal course for visual expression exploring vari- 
ous animated techniques: developmental, fil- 
mographic, rear lit, cut out, line, eel, etc. 
Students purchase texts, art supplies film 
materials, and processing. Prerequisite: 355 or 
consent of department. 

455-3 Film Production III. Advanced pro- 
duction by individuals or crews of 16 mm 
sound films from pre-production through 
shooting. Intensive study of budgeting, pro- 
duction planning, scripting, casting, location 
and studio shooting techniques, equipment 
rental, lighting, and double system sound 
filming. Students provide film stock, process- 
ing, and sound materials. Prerequisite: 356, 
452, or consent of department. 
456-3 Film Production IV. Continuation of 
455 through post production to a first answer 
print. Intensive study of editing, sound mix- 
ing, laboratory procedures, and distribution 
problems. Students provide editing and sound 



Course Descriptions 



Cinema and Photography / 245 



materials and are responsible for laboratory 
costs. Prerequisite: 455 and consent of 
department. 

462-3 History of the Documentary Film. 
Study of the development of the non-fiction 
film with emphasis on the documentary. 
Screening fee. Students purchase texts. 
463-3 History of the Experimental Film. 
Study of experimentation in cinema from the 
turn of the century, to contemporary avant- 
garde films. Screening fee. Students purchase 
texts. 

465-3 History of the Animated Film. 
Study of the history, techniques, and aesthet- 
ics of the graphic/animated film. Students 
purchase texts. Screening fee. 
466-3 to 6 Film Styles and Genres. Inten- 
sive study of a specific body of films grouped by 
similarities in style, genre, period, or cultural 
origin. Emphasis on historical, theoretical, 
and critical issues. Topics vary each semester. 
Examples: the Western; the French New Wave, 
Third World cinema; Surrealism in film. 
Screening fee. 

467-3 to 6 Film Authors. Intensive study of 
the work of one or more film authors (directors, 
screenwriters, etc.). Emphasis is on historical, 
theoretical, and critical issues. Topics vary 
each semester. Examples: the films of Alfred 
Hitchcock, the films of Jean Renois. Screening 
fee. 

468-3 Advanced Film Theory and Analy- 
sis. An intensive study of contemporary film 
theory with an emphasis on the application of 
analytic models. Focus is on structural, semi- 
otic, and psychoanalytical theory of the cine- 
ma, and the textual analysis of specific films. 
Screening fee. Prerequisite: 368 or graduate 
standing. 

470-3 to 9 (3,3,3) Advanced Topics. An ad- 
vanced course concentrating on special topics 
in cinema and photography, (a) Advanced 
studies in cinema history/theory. Topics of- 
fered have been the information film, feminist 
and ideological criticism of film, (b) Advanced 
topics in film production. Topics offered have 
included motion picture sound workshop, nar- 
rative film workshop, (c) Advanced studies in 
photography. Topics offered have included 
publication and presentation, the figure, multi- 
image, fantasy photography, among others, 
(d) Advanced studies in interdisciplinary top- 
ics. Not more than 6 semester hours may be 
counted for graduate credit. Screening/lab fee. 
Prerequisite: consent of department. 
471-3 to 6 (3,3) Problems in Creative 
Production: Photography. Conceptual ex- 
ercises involving different aspects of photo- 
graphic production. Emphasis is placed upon 
individual creative response to assignments. 
Topics vary; may be repeated for a total of 6 
credits. Students provide photographic ma- 
terials and chemicals and may purchase texts. 
Prerequisite: consent of department. 
472-3 to 6 (3,3) Problems in Creative 
Production: Cinema. An intensive exami- 
nation, through readings, screenings, and 
filmmaking, of a cinematic genre, style, move- 
ment, or technical challenge. Theory is com- 



bined with practice, resulting in a group film 
production. Previous problems studied have 
been the pseudo-documentary, 35mm film- 
making, and film as performance. Topics may 
vary; may be repeated for a total of 6 credits. 
Prerequisite: consent of department. 
491-1 to 9 Individual Study in Cinema or 
Photography. Research in history, theory, or 
aesthetics. Not more than 9 semester hours of 
491, 495, and 497 combined may count toward 
the first 38 hours for the B.A. in cinema and 
photography. Not for graduate credit. Prereq- 
uisite: consent of department. 
492-1 to 3 Practicum. Practical experience 
in the presentation of photographic theory and 
procedures. Does not count toward the first 38 
hours for the B.A. in cinema and photography. 
Not for graduate credit. Prerequisite: consent 
of department. Mandatory Pass/ Fail. 
495-1 to 12 Internship in Cinema or Pho- 
tography. Used to recognize experience with 
professional film or photographic unit. Not 
more than 9 semester hours of 49 1 , 495, and 497 
combined may count toward the first 38 hours 
for the B.A. in cinema and photography. Not 
for graduate credit. Prerequisite: consent of 
department. Mandatory Pass/Fail. 
497-1 to 9 Projects in Cinema or Photog- 
raphy. Individual or crew projects in motion 
picture production or still photography. Not 
more than 9 semester hours of 491, 495, and 497 
combined may count toward the first 38 hours 
for the B.A. degree in cinema and pho- 
tography. Not for graduate credit. Prerequisite: 
consent of department. 

499-4 Senior Thesis. Preparation of a film, 
critical or research paper under the supervision 
of a cinema and photography faculty member. 
Normally taken during the last term in 
residence, the senior thesis is evaluated by the 
department faculty. The department will 
retain one copy of all theses. Students interest- 
ed in producing a film for 499 should have 
completed 355, 356, 368, and 452 and 9 hours of 
cinema history courses. Not for graduate 
credit. Prerequisite: consent of department. 
Mandatory Pass/Fail. 

541A-3 Seminar: History of Photogra- 
phy, 1839 to World War II. Advanced study 
of the history of photography with emphasis 
on the development of technique and content. 
Students purchase texts. 

541B-3 Seminar: Contemporary History 
of Photography. Advanced study of the his- 
tory of photography with emphasis on the de- 
velopment of technique and content. Students 
purchase texts. 

542A-3 Seminar in Film History: Ameri- 
can. Analysis of the films and ideas associated 
with a particular director or a significant 
movement in motion picture history. Screening 
fee. Students purchase texts. Course content 
varies each semester; may be repeated for a 
total of 6 credits. 

542B-3 Seminar in Film History: Inter- 
national. Analysis of the films and ideas as- 
sociated with a particular director or a signifi- 
cant movement in motion picture history. 



246 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



Screening fee. Students purchase texts. Course 
content varies each semester; may be repeated 
for a total of 6 credits. 

574-3 Contemporary Theory and Analy- 
sis of Cinema. An intensive examination of 
the dominant recent theoretical approaches to 
the cinema. The application of cinema of sem- 
iology and structuralism, with very recent 
branches into psychoanalysis and ideology, 
will be concentrated upon. Films related to the 
issues under study are assigned for viewing. 
Students purchase texts. 
575-6 (3,3) Contemporary Theory and 
Analysis of Photography. Selected read- 
ings in the aesthetics and philosophy of pho- 
tography. Students purchase texts. Weekly 
reading assignments, discussions, midterm 
exam, and final paper. Topics vary; may be 
repeated for a total of 6 credits. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. 

591-1 to 6 Individual Study in Cinema 
and Photography. Supervised research or 
independent creative work, the area of study to 
be determined by the student in consultation 
with cinema and photography faculty. Pre- 
requisite: consent of department. 
595-1 to 4 (1,1,1,1) Graduate Seminar. A 
seminar for graduate degree candidates focus- 
ing on the artistic development of the partici- 
pants, (a) Graduate seminar in photography, 
(b) Graduate seminar in film production. Pre- 
requisite: admission to the M.F.A. program in 
still photography or the M. A. program in pub- 
lic visual communications. 
597-1 to 16 M.F.A. Projects. Supervised in- 
dependent creative work, the amount and ex- 
act nature of which is to be determined in con- 
sultation with the cinema and photography 
faculty. Prerequisite: admission to the M.F.A. 
program and consent of department. 
598-1 to 6 M.F.A. Final Creative Project. 
Supervised independent creative work leading 
to the completion of the M.F.A. creative project 
requirement. Registration for six hours of 598 
is required of each M.F.A. candidate. Prereq- 
uisite: admission to the M.F.A. program and 
consent of the department. 
601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/U or DEF only. 



Civil Engineering and 
Mechanics 



(See Engineering.) 



Communication 
Disorders and Sciences 

408-3 Communication Disorders: Cra- 
niofacial Anomalies. An introduction to the 
ontology, teratology, and management of cleft 
palate and various craniofacial syndromes 
important to majors and non-majors interested 
in this aspect of communication and its dis- 
orders. Association problems of personal and 
social adjustments are also examined. Prereq- 
uisite: 105, 214, 318, or consent of instructor. 
419-3 Communication Problems of the 
Hearing Impaired. Objectives and tech- 
niques for the teaching of lip reading, speech 
conservation, and auditory training. Prerequi- 
site: 302, 303, 316, or equivalents, or consent of 
instructor. 

420-3 Introduction to Audiological Dis- 
orders and Evaluation. Bases of profes- 
sional field of audiology (orientation, acous- 
tics, anatomy, and physiology of the auditory 
system), major disease processes influencing 
hearing and their manifestations, measure- 
ment of hearing loss. Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA in 
program retention courses or concurrent en- 
rollment and consent of instructor, or graduate 
standing. 

428-3 Communication Disorders and the 
Classroom Teacher. Etiology and therapy 
of common speech defects. May be taken by all 
inservice teachers, seniors, and graduate stu- 
dents in education. 

431-1 to 6 (1 to 3, 1 to 3) Biofeedback 
Communication. An investigation into the 
experimental approaches for the study of the 
phenomena of speech. Evoked potential and 
signal averaging techniques, psychophysiolo- 
gical methodology. Laboratory experience 
with various biofeedback instrumentation, 
EMG, EEG, temperature, ECG, etc. Open to 
non-majors. 

438-2 Problems of Communication and 
the Process of Aging. Reviews problems of 
communication related to the aging process 
and examines relevant diagnostic and thera- 
peutic techniques. For non-majors only. Pre- 
requisite: senior or graduate standing. 
450-3 Neuroanatomical Basis of Human 
Communication. Examination of the central 
nervous system (brain and spinal cord) as it 
relates to normal and disordered human 
communication. Presentation of basic neuro- 
anatomy, common neuropathologies relevant 
to communication disorders, and strategies in 
neurogenic problem solving. Prerequisite: 214, 
307 or consent of instructor. 
485-1 to 3 Special Topics in Communica- 
tion Disorders and Sciences. Topical pres- 
entations of current information on special in- 
terests of the faculty not otherwise covered in 
the curriculum. Designed to promote better un- 
derstanding of recent developments related to 
disorders of verbal communication. Open to 
advanced undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents with consent of instructor. 



Course Descriptions 



Communication Disorders and Sciences / 247 



489-1 Seminar in Developmental Psy- 
cho-Neurolinguistics. Seminar will explore 
current issues in the area of developmental 
psycholiguistics and neurolinguistics. Includ- 
ed will be normal language use and develop- 
ment, as well as disordered language use and 
development; foreign/second as well as first 
language will be included. Development will be 
interpreted to mean life-span. Same as PSYCH 
489 and LING 489. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor(s). 

491-1 to 3 Individual Study. Activities in- 
volved shall be investigative, creative, or clini- 
cal in character. Must be arranged in advance 
with the instructor, with consent of the chair. 
Prerequisite: consent of chair. 
494-1 to 12 (1-4 per area) Advanced Clin- 
ical Practice: Speech/Language. Ad- 
vanced clinical practicum in (a) articulation 
and phonology, (b) language disorders, (c) 
voice disorders, and (d) fluency disorders. Em- 
phasis will be placed on specialized therapy 
procedures, diagnostic techniques, and the 
preparation of reports. For communication 
disorders and sciences majors only. Prerequi- 
site: (a) 302, 392, and 393 or equivalents and 
consent of the chair; (b) 303, 392, and 393 or 
equivalents and consent of the chair; (c) 318, 
392, and 393 or concurrent enrollment or 
equivalent courses and consent of the chair; (d) 
319, 392, and 393, or equivalent courses and 
consent of the chair. 

496-1 to 2 (1,1) Advanced Clinical Prac- 
tice: Hearing Disorders. Advanced clinical 
practice in hearing disorders. Emphasis will be 
placed on rehabilitative procedures in audiol- 
ogy . For communication disorders and sciences 
majors only. Prerequisite: 316 and 493 or 
equivalents and consent of chair. 
497-1 to 2 (1,1) Advanced Clinical Prac- 
tice: Hearing Diagnostics. Advanced clini- 
cal practice in hearing diagnostics. Emphasis 
will be placed on diagnostic techniques used in 
the preparation of basic and advanced audiol- 
ogical reports. For communication disorders 
and sciences majors only. Prerequisite: 316, 
420, and 493 or equivalents and consent of 
chair. 

500-3 Research Design in Speech Pathol- 
ogy and Audiology. Evaluation of the stra- 
tegies and procedural tactics of behavioral 
research. 

503-3 Laboratory Instrumentation in 
Speech-Language and Hearing Science. 
Physiological, acoustical, and biomedical re- 
cording, measurement and analysis of the 
speech encoder, decoder, and code for clinical 
and research applications. Prerequisite: 203 or 
consent of instructor. 

505-3 Phonological Acquisition. An intro- 
ductory discussion of the important linguistic, 
physiological, and acoustic variables which 
affect language production at the segmental 
and suprasegmental level of language; and an 
historical examination of the growth and de- 
velopment of distinctive feature systems from 
1920 to the present. Concentration upon the 
mathematical, logical, physiological, and 
acoustic assumptions of the various matrices 
which have been developed. Prerequisite: 302 
or equivalent and consent of instructor. 



507-3 Language Acquisition. Discussion of 
the application of current theoretical impli- 
cations and research findings to the syntacti- 
cally impaired. This course emphasizes diag- 
nostic and therapeutic models applicable to 
language disorders. Opportunities for research 
and clinical experience with young children 
displaying developmental language problems 
will be provided. Required for master's 
students. Prerequisite: 303 or equivalent and 
consent of instructor. 

510-3 Stuttering: Behavior Assessment 
and Therapy. Explores the assumptions un- 
derlying diagnosis and assessment. Proce- 
dures specific to the differential assessment of 
fluency failures are examined, evaluated, and 
related to therapeutic strategies and the tactics 
of behavior change. Prerequisite: 319 or 
equivalent, and consent of instructor. 
512-3 Voice Disorders. An intensive study 
of the variables of air stream modulation re- 
sulting from impaired structures and function 
of head and neck. Prerequisite: 318 or equiva- 
lent and consent of instructor. 
517-3 Seminar: Language Disorders in 
Children. Students will explore current theo- 
ries of syntactical and semantic acquisition 
with an emphasis upon applicability to clinical 
research and methodology. An historical 
review of linguistic theory will form the basis 
for discussion of research approaches in psy- 
cholinguistics. Students will review psycho- 
linguistic research and devise paradigms ap- 
propriate for the study of verbal impairment. 
Elective course for master's and doctoral can- 
didates. Prerequisite: 303 or equivalent and 
consent of instructor. 

521-3 Audiology II: Peripheral and Cen- 
tral Auditory Tests. Application of special 
behavioral auditory techniques used for siteof- 
lesion testing, basic anatomical and neuro- 
logical correlates of abnormal auditory behav- 
ior. Prerequisites: 420 or equivalent and 
consent of instructor. 

525-3 Amplification for the Hearing Im- 
paired. Clinical and laboratory methods of 
evaluating hearing aid performance; counsel- 
ing of adult clients, parents and teachers; pro- 
fessional relationship of audiologist to otolo- 
gists and to hearing aid dealers; use and 
evaluation of individual and classroom audi- 
tory trainers. Prerequisites: 420 and consent of 
instructor. 

526-3 Audiology III: Objective Proce- 
dures and Hearing Conservation. Theory 
and practice in the use of objective auditory 
procedures such as acoustic immittance meas- 
ures, auditory brainstem response, and event 
related potentials; also a consideration of tech- 
niques used in hearing conservation such as 
environmental noise controls and identifica- 
tion audiometry. Prerequisites: 420, and con- 
sent of instructor. 

528-3 Seminar: Physio- and Psycho- 
Acoustics of the Ear. Advanced study of the 
physiological responses of the middle and in- 
ner ear to the acoustic stimulus, in relation to 
major theories of auditory function; advanced 
study of behavioral responses to the major pa- 
rameters of the acoustic stimulus; threshold 
sensitivity, loudness, pitch, localization. 



248 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



beats, and masking. Prerequisite: 316 or 
equivalent and consent of instructor. 
530-3 Aural Rehabilitation/Auditory 
Perceptual Disorders. Advanced study of 
aural (re) habilitative principles and practices 
for children and adults as well as diagnoses 
and remediation of auditory perceptual disor- 
ders. Prerequisites: 420, 521, 525, and consent 
of instructor. 

533-3 to 6 (3,3) Seminar: Speech and Au- 
ditory Perception. Special problems in 
hearing and communication science. Students 
may choose from a wide range of topics: speech 
acoustic, kinesthetic and vibrotactile per- 
ception, voiceprint identification, synthetic 
and compressed speech, digital speech, elec- 
trostimulation of hearing, and neurophysiolo- 
gical basis for perception. One or more topics 
are pursued in depth. The seminar may be re- 
peated for a total of six hours with different 
content. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
536-3 Seminar: Administration of Speech 
and Hearing Programs. Program settings, 
organizational procedures, and professional 
interrelationships in adult speech and hearing 
therapy. Field trips to rehabilitation centers 
and related agencies. 

540-3 Neurogenic Disorders of Commu- 
nication I. Focus on aphasia and neurolin- 
guistic science. A clinically oriented presenta- 
tion of the aphasias, and related CNS 
language disturbances, will be integrated with 
an introduction to the broader field of neurolin- 
guistics. Clinical aspects will focus on assess- 
ment of rehabilitation approaches in aphasia 
and related disorders. Other topics include cor- 
tical language representation, hemispheric 
functions (general), and review of basic neuro- 
linguistic literature. Prerequisite: 450 or con- 
sent of instructor. 

541-3 Neurogenic Disorders of Commu- 
nication II. Focus on the role of the pyramidal 
and extrapyramidal motor systems in speech 
production and speech disorders related to 
abnormalities in these motor systems. Discus- 
sion of the neurological basis and clinical 
management of the dysarthrias and verbal 
apraxia. Prerequisite: 540 or consent of 
instructor. 

544-3 Seminar: Phonological Disorders 
in Children. An historical examination of the 
growth and development of distinctive feature 
systems from 1 920 to the present. Concentrates 
on the mathematical, logical, physiological, 
and acoustic assumptions of the various 
matrices which have been developed. Prereq- 
uisite: 302 or equivalent and consent of 
instructor. 

548-3 Seminar: Stuttering Behavior- 
Theory and Research. Examines modern 
learning theory approaches to fluency failure. 
The learning models dealt with are critically 
examined in relation to clinical and experi- 
mental data. Also reviews the research data on 
stuttering in relation to design, methodology, 
and technology. Discussions serve as the 
background for original investigations. Pre- 
requisite: 319 or equivalent and consent of 
instructor. 



550-1 to 15 Professional Training Semi- 
nar. A special seminar that provides doctoral 
students the opportunity to prepare and 
present papers on various aspects of speech- 
language pathology and audiology. Liberal 
discussion will follow each paper. All doctoral 
students are required to enroll for one credit 
each semester until admitted to candidacy. 
Graded S/ U only. Only four credit hours are 
counted toward the Ph.D. degree. 
590-1 to 4 (1 to 2, 1 to 2) Readings in 
Speech-Language Pathology and Audiol- 
ogy. Supervised and directed readings in 
specific areas of speech pathology and in audi- 
ology. Maximum of two hours counted toward 
master's degree. Prerequisite: consent of 
chair. 

593-1 to 3 Research Problems in Speech- 
Language Pathology and Audiology. In- 
dividual work upon selected problems for re- 
search. Prerequisite: consent of chair. 
598-1 to 3 Internship in Speech-Lan- 
guage Pathology and Audiology. Intern- 
ship in a selected medical center, hospital clin- 
ic, community agency, or private clinic. The 
internship provides the student with an inten- 
sive, professional, clinical experience under 
supervision of qualified and certified resident 
staff members. Prerequisite: consent of chair. 
599-1 to 6 Thesis. 

600-1 to 32 (1 to 16 per semester) 
Dissertation. 

601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/U or DEF only. 



Communications and 
Fine Arts 

497-1 to 6 Special Interdisciplinary 
Study. Designed to offer and test new and 
experimental courses and series of courses 
within the College of Communications and 
Fine Arts. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 



Community Development 

401-3 Introduction to Community Devel- 
opment. This course surveys the field of com- 
munity development, an applied social science 
that encourages self-reliance by generating 
change and growth strategies for groups and 
communities. The course focuses on the 
history and philosophy of community develop- 
ment, citizen rights issues, change techniques, 
value dilemmas confronting change agents, 



Course Descriptions 



Community Development / 249 



and examination of some current community 
development programs. 

402-3 Third World Community Develop- 
ment. Analyses of the history, goals, methods, 
and techniques of socioeconomic development 
in the Third World countries. Cultural, 
economic, social structural, political, and ad- 
ministrative factors in development and in the 
process of community organization are dis- 
cussed. Case studies from Africa, Asia, and 
Latin America. 

403-3 Community Organization. An ex- 
amination of basic approaches to community 
organization used by change agents and hu- 
man service workers. Special emphasis is 
placed on sensitizing students to consumer 
participation issues. 

404-3 Role Theory and Analysis in Com- 
munity Development. The focus of this 
course is on role theory and methods of analy- 
sis. The student will gain considerable expo- 
sure to the techniques of role analysis as an 
evaluation tool in community development 
training and program development. 
405-3 Social Planning. Introduction to the 
methods, practices, functions, and ethics of so- 
cial planning in the United States, including a 
critical perspective. Criminal justice, health, 
manpower, welfare, and other sectors of social 
planning will be discussed to illustrate the 
principles of social planning. 
489-3 Field Service Seminar. (Same as So- 
cial Work 489.) This seminar is to be taken 
concurrently with 495 or SW 495. May not be 
taken for credit if credit has been earned in 389 
or SW 289. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
491-1 to 6 Independent Study in Commu- 
nity Development. Supervised individual 
study and projects in keeping with the needs of 
each student. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

495-1 to 6 Advanced Field Services Prac- 
ticum in Southern Illinois. (Same as Social 
Work 495.) This course is directed at up- 
perclassmen and graduate students volun- 
teering service to community, social service, or 
health agencies in southern Illinois. Credit 
based on time spent in direct service. Approval 
of agency required for registration. May not be 
taken for credit if credit has been earned in 295 
or SW 295. Mandatory Pass/Fail for 
undergraduates. 

497-1 to 12 (1 to 3 per topic) Seminar in 
Community Development. The identifica- 
tion and analysis of special problems in com- 
munity development, (a) Project funding, eval- 
uating, and reporting; (b) central and 
peripheral systems in community develop- 
ment; (c) community development cooperatives 
and credit unions; (d) research problems and 
methods; (e) special problems. Credit limited to 
not more than three per topic and not more 
than 12 total. 

500-3 Research Seminar in Community 
Development. Introduction to research de- 
sign, theory, sampling, data collection (both 
qualitative and quantitative), information re- 
trieval, data analysis, and research criticism. 
Content based on community issues and con- 
cerns. Students are encouraged to incorporate 



their interests and projects into the course 
work. 

501-4 Small Group Process in Communi- 
ty Development. This course combines theo- 
ry and laboratory methods in giving the stu- 
dent greater awareness of the dynamics of 
individual interaction in small groups. Such 
issues as authority, leadership, power, trust, 
decision making, communication, problem 
solving, goal setting and attainment, giving 
and receiving feedback, resource utilization, 
and evaluation are covered in both theory and 
laboratory sessions. 

502-3 Community and Change. Analyses 
of causes of social problems and methods for 
planned change at community level. Local 
community problems are examined in the con- 
text of wider socio-economic and political set- 
tings. Changing patterns of community in the 
United States and elsewhere are explored. 
503-3 Community Development Practice. 
Focuses upon a range of community de- 
velopment problems, models, and practical 
skills. Observation of field consultants, com- 
munity organizers and agencies, and persons 
skilled in and programs demonstrating dis- 
tinctive approaches to community develop- 
ment. Prerequisite: 401. 

589-2 Community Development Intern- 
ship Seminar. To prepare student for super- 
vised field internship experience. Must be tak- 
en concurrently with (or as a prerequisite to) 
595, Internship. 

593-1 to 6 Individual Research in Com- 
munity Development. Enables an ad- 
vanced student to do independent study in 
community development under the supervi- 
sion of a faculty member or to pursue work on a 
terminal research report or advanced field 
project. Prerequisite: 500 and consent of 
instructor. 

595-1 to 8 Internship. A supervised field ex- 
perience to acquaint students with problems, 
situations, and challenges typical of commu- 
nity development work. Students develop a 
community-based project which allows them 
to gain experience while demonstrating profi- 
ciency in appropriate skills. Personal growth 
and professional potential are considered in 
evaluating the intern's field performance. Sev- 
en credit hours (350 field hours) are required for 
the M.S. degree; additional work may be taken 
as elective hours, calculated at 50 clock hours 
per semester hour. Graded S/ c/only. Prerequi- 
site: 589 or concurrent enrollment and consent 
of internship coordinator. 
599-1 to 6 Thesis Research. Credit is given 
for work accomplished on a master's thesis 
when it is accepted and approved by the thesis 
committee. Prerequisite: 500 and approval of 
thesis committee chair. 

601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 



250 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



in anv other course is not permitted. Graded 
S U or DEF only. 



Computer Science 

401-3 Computer Architecture. Review of 
logical circuit design. Hardware description 
languages. Algorithms for high speed addi- 
tion, multiplication, and division. Pipelined 
arithmetic. Implementation and control issues 
using PLA's and micro-programming control. 
Cache and main memory design. Input/ 
output. Introduction to interconnection net- 
works and multiprocessor organization. Pre- 
requisite: 306 and 315 each with a grade of C or 
better. 

411-3 Programming Languages. Study of 
the significant features of existing program- 
ming languages with particular emphasis on 
the underlying concepts abstracted from these 
languages. Includes formal specification of 
syntax and semantics, representation and 
evaluation of simple statements, grouping of 
statements, scopes and storage allocation, 
procedures. Prerequisite: 220 and 302 each with 
a grade of C or better; a working knowledge of 
at least two of the high-level languages covered 
by the 311 courses is recommended. 
414-3 Operating Systems. An introduction 
to the different components of operating sys- 
tems including I/O programming, memory 
management, virtual memory, process man- 
agement, concurrency, device management, 
file management. Prerequisite: 306 and 330 
each with a grade of C or better and a working 
knowledge of the language C. 
416-3 Compiler Construction. Introduc- 
tion to compiler construction. Design of a sim- 
ple complete compiler, including lexical analy- 
sis, syntactical analysis, type checking, and 
code generation. Prerequisite: 411 with a grade 
of C or better. 

430-3 Database Systems. A comprehensive 
treatment of database systems, including net- 
work, hierarchical, and relational systems. 
Prerequisite: 330 with a grade of C or better. 
435-3 Software Design and Develop- 
ment. An exercise in the analysis, design, im- 
plementation, testing, and maintenance of a 
large modular application system. Team pro- 
duction of a system is the focal point for the 
course. Topics include the system life cycle, 
system specification, human interfaces, mod- 
ular design, improved programming tech- 
niques, and program verification and valida- 
tion. Prerequisite: 306 and 330, each with a 
grade of C or better. 

436-3 Artificial Intelligence I. Search and 
heuristics, problem reduction. Predicate calcu- 
lus, automated theorem proving. Knowledge 
representation. Applications of artificial intel- 
ligence. Parallel processing in artificial intelli- 
gence. Prerequisite: 315 with a grade of C or 
better; at least one of 311L, or 31 IP, or concur- 
rent enrollment. 

440-3 Introduction to Computer Net- 
works. Design and analysis of computer com- 
munication networks. Topics to be covered in- 



clude: queuing systems, data transmission, 
data link protocols, topological design, routing, 
flow control, security and privacy, and 
network performance evaluation. Prerequi- 
sites: 306 and 315 each with a grade of C or 
better and MATH 380. 

447-3 Introduction to Graphy Theory. 
(Same as Mathematics 447.) Introduction to 
theory of graphs, digraphs, and networks and 
applications to electrical systems and comput- 
er science. Topics include blocks and cutpoints, 
Eulerian graphs, trees, cycle and cocycle 
spaces, planarity and Kuratowski's Theorem, 
connectivity and Menger's Theorem, Hamil- 
tonian graphs, colorability and Headwood's 
Theorem, flows in networks and Ford- 
Fulkerson Theorem and critical path analysis. 
Prerequisite: MATH 221, and CS 315, or 
MATH 319. 

449-3 Introduction to Cominatorics. 
(Same as Mathematics 449.) An introduction to 
combinatorical mathematics with computing 
applications. Topics include selection and 
arrangements, generating functions, recur- 
sion, inclusion and exclusion, coding theory, 
block designs. Prerequisite: 315 or MATH 319 
or consent of department. 
451-3 Introduction to Automata and the 
Theory of Computing. The fundamental 
concepts of the theory of computation includ- 
ing finite state acceptors, formal grammars, 
Turing machines and recursive functions. Re- 
lationship between grammars and machines 
with emphasis on regular expressions and 
context-free languages. Prerequisite: 306 and 
315 each with a grade of C or better. 
455-3 Design and Analysis of Computer 
Algorithms. Introduction to design, analysis, 
and complexity of algorithms. Searching/ 
sorting algorithms, polynomial and matrix al- 
gorithms, graph theoretic algorithms. Intro- 
duction to complexity theory. Prerequisite: 315 
and 330, each with a grade of C or better and 
MATH 380. 

464-6 (3,3) Numerical Analysis. (Same as 
Mathematics 475. )An introduction to the 
theory and practice of computation with spe- 
cial emphasis on methods useful with digital 
computers. Topics include the solution of non- 
linear equations, interpolation and approxi- 
mation, numerical differentiation and inte- 
gration, solution of differential equations, ma- 
trix calculations and the solution of systems of 
linear equations. Prerequisite: (a) MATH 221 
and 250 and a working knowledge of FOR- 
TRAN, (b) 464a and MATH 305. 
470-3 Computer Simulation Techniques. 
Applications and rationale. Design and anal- 
ysis of discrete simulation models. Generation 
of random sequences and stochastic variates. 
Simulation languages. Prerequisite: 202 and 
MATH 380. 

471-3 Introduction to Optimization Tech- 
niques. (Same as Mathematics 471.) Nature of 
optimization problems. General and special 
purpose methods of optimization, such as 
linear programming, classical optimization, 
separable programming, integer program- 
ming, and dynamic programming. Prerequi- 
site: 202 and MATH 221 and 250. 



Course Descriptions 



Computer Science / 251 



472-3 Linear Programming. (Same as 
Mathematics 472.) Nature and purpose of the 
linear programming model. Development of 
the simplex method. Application of the model 
to various problems. Duality theory. Trans- 
portation. Assignment problem. Postoptimali- 
ty analysis. Prerequisite: 202 and MATH 221. 
485-3 Computer Graphics. Study of the de- 
vices and techniques for the use of computers 
in generating graphical displays. Includes 
display devices, display processing, transfor- 
mation systems, interactive graphics, 3- 
dimensional graphics, graphics system design 
and configuration, low and high level graphics 
languages, and applications. Prerequisite: 220 
and 302 each with a grade of C or better, 
MATH 150 and 221 are recommended. 
490-1 to 6 (1 to 3 per semester) Readings. 
Supervised readings in selected subjects. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor and 
department. 

491-1 to 4 Special Topics. Selected ad- 
vanced topics from the various fields of com- 
puter science. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

492-1 to 6 (1 to 3 per semester) Special 
Problems. Individual projects involving in- 
dependent work. Prerequisite: consent of 
department. 

493-1 to 4 Seminar. Supervised study. Prep- 
aration and presentation of reports. Prerequi- 
site: consent of instructor. 
501-3 Advanced Computer Architecture. 
Hardware and software elements of multipro- 
cessors, multicomputers, pipeline and array 
machines, data flow architecture, and other 
state-of-the-art architectures. Design princi- 
ples related to machine structures, intercon- 
nection networks, control software and hard- 
ware, data storage, and access. Prerequisite: 
401. 

502-3 Design and Analysis of VLSI Sys- 
tems. The theory, technology, fabrication, and 
design of digital integrated circuits that are 
commonly used in modern computers. Con- 
struction and analysis of algorithms for VLSI 
design such as: PLA minimizer and folder, 
design rule checker, circuit extractor, and 
router. Silicon complier. Prerequisite: 401. 
503-3 Fault-Tolerant Computing Sys- 
tems. An introduction to different aspects of 
fault-tolerance in computing systems. Concur- 
rent checking techniques. Redundancy tech- 
niques. Evaluation methods. System-level di- 
agnosis and fault-tolerant VLSI architectures. 
Prerequisite: 401. 

511-3 Formal Specification of Program- 
ming Languages. A survey of modeling tech- 
niques and meta languages for the formal 
specification of the syntax and semantics of 
high-level programming languages. Prerequi- 
site: 411. 

512-3 Declarative Programming. An ad- 
vanced level course on nonprocedural pro- 
gramming with emphasis on logic program- 
ming, pure functional programming, and the 
characteristics of the declarative style com- 
mon to these two paradigms. Topics include 
logic programming, functional programming, 
implementation consideration for each along 



with current research topics in the areas. Pre- 
requisite: 411. 

514-3 Advanced Operating Systems. Rig- 
orous treatment of advanced topics in operat- 
ing systems. Multiprocessor and distributed 
operating systems. Highly concurrent ma- 
chines. Performance analysis of memory man- 
agement and scheduling algorithms. Security 
in operating systems. Prerequisite: 414. 
516-3 Advanced Compilers. A continuation 
of 416 including advanced topics in lexical and 
syntax analysis, error recovery, sematic 
analysis, code optimization, and compiler 
compilers. Prerequisite: 416. 
530-3 Advanced Data Base System. A de- 
tailed treatment of advanced topics in data 
base systems including, but not limited or re- 
stricted to, relational database theory, query 
optimization, recovery techniques, concurren- 
cy control, distributed database systems, se- 
curity and integrity, and database machines. 
Prerequisite: 430. 

532-3 to 6 Topics in Information Systems. 
A detailed study of two or three topics relevant 
to information systems. Topics may include 
but are not limited to sorting, searching, 
information retrieval and automatic text 
processing, database security and encryption, 
distributed databases, and data communica- 
tion. Prerequisite: 430 and consent of 
instructor. 

536-3 Artificial Intelligence II. Theorem 
proving, the Resolution Principle, strategies, 
and achievements. Program verification. Nat- 
ural language processing. Other selected top- 
ics. Prerequisite: 436. 

540-3 Parallel Processing. An advanced 
treatment of the theory and implementation of 
parallel processing. Topics include architec- 
tural considerations, parallel programming on 
multiprocessor and multicomputer systems, 
and the identification and exploitation of 
parallelism in algorithms. Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. 

553-3 Formal Languages and Automata. 
The Chomsky hierarchy of formal grammars 
and the corresponding classes of automata. 
Turing machines and basic concepts of com- 
putability. Recursive and recursively enumer- 
able languages. Closure properties. Undecida- 
ble problems about Turing machines and 
context-free languages. Deterministic context- 
free languages and the construction of LR par- 
sers. Prerequisite: 451. 

555-3 Theory of Computability. Turing 
machines and other models of computation. 
Computable functions. Church's thesis. Solv- 
able and unsolvable problems. Introduction to 
complexity theory including the classes P and 
NP. Polynomial time approximation algor- 
ithms for NP-complete problems. Prerequisite: 
451. 

564-1 to 12 Advanced Topics in Numeri- 
cal Analysis. (Same as Mathematics 572.) Se- 
lected advanced topics in Numerical Analysis 
chosen from such areas as: approximation 
theory; numerical solution of initial value 
problems; numerical solution of boundary val- 
ue problems; numerical linear algebra; numer- 
ical methods of optimization; functional ana- 



252 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



lytic methods. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

570-3 to 9 per topic (3,3,3) Topics in Op- 
erations Research. (Same as Mathematics 
370.) (a) Netflows. Builds on network and gen- 
eralized network models for the transporta- 
tion, transhipment, assignment, shortest 
path, maximal flow. Prerequisite: 472 or 
MATH 472. (b) Advanced computer simula- 
tion. Review of GPSS. Advanced topics in 
GPSS. Generation of random variates. Valida- 
tion, parametric, and nonparametric tests. De- 
sign of experiments, optimization, parameter 
tuning. Analysis of variance, spectral analy- 
sis, and variance reduction. Prerequisite: 470 
and MATH 480 or 483. (c) Large scale linear 
programming. Advanced L.P. techniques for 
sparge matrices and reinversion routines. Pre- 
requisite: 472 or MATH 472. (d) Nonlinear pro- 
gramming. Integer programming with branch 
and bound and cutting plane methods for solv- 
ing integer programming problems. Basic dy- 
namic programming with emphasis on the 
methods and applications. Prerequisite: 472 or 
MATH 472. 

585-3 Advanced Topics in Computer 
Graphics. Study of computer graphics for re- 
alistic image synthesis. Object modeling and 
associated date structures. Advanced render- 
ing techniques such as raytracing and radiosi- 
ty. Efficiency considerations. Image composi- 
tion and compression. Current advances and 
research problems in realistic computer graph- 
ics. Prerequisite: 485. 

586-3 Pattern Recognition and Image 
Processing. An introduction to the area of 
computer vision for the purpose of restoration, 
segmentation, encoding, analysis, and recog- 
nition of pictures. Topics include: image trans- 
forms, edge detection, smoothing, filtering, 
pseudo-coloring, syntactic methods in scene 
analysis, parametric decision theory, non- 
parametric decision theory, linear discrimi- 
nant functions, parameter estimation, super- 
vised learning, and unsupervised learning. 
Prerequisite: 220 and MATH 380 or consent of 
instructor. 

590- 1 to 9 Readings. Supervised readings in 
selected subjects. Graded S/U only. Prereq- 
uisite: consent of instructor and department. 
59 1 - 1 to 9 ( 1 to 3 per topic) Special Topics. 
Selected advanced topics from the various 
fields of computer science. 
592-1 to 6 (1 to 3 per semester) Special 
Problems. Individual projects involving in- 
dependent work. Graded S/U only. Prerequi- 
site: consent of department. 
593-1 to 4 Seminar. Preparation and pres- 
entation of reports. Graded S/U only. Prereq- 
uisite: consent of instructor. 
599-1 to 5 Thesis. Minimum of three hours to 
be counted toward a master's degree. Pre- 
requisite: consent of department. 
601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum the- 



sis, or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/U or DEF only. 



Curriculum and 
Instruction 

400-2 Simulation and Gaming. The role of 
simulation and gaming in instruction, the 
availability of commercial games and simula- 
tion devices, and the theoretical backgrounds 
used in constructing teacher-made games are 
to be examined. 

402-3 Education for Disadvantaged and 
Culturally Different Students. The student 
examines the characteristics of behavior and 
learning patterns of culturally different and 
socioeconomically disadvantaged children. 
Content also includes school adjustment, 
experiential background, self-concept, lan- 
guage development, and appropriate teacher 
behaviors and teaching strategies. 
404-3 Infant Development. Current theo- 
ries and knowledge concerning growth and de- 
velopment of infants with related laboratory 
field experiences. Prerequisite: 237, or PSYC 
301, or equivalent. 

405-4 Methodologies for Group Care of 
Infants and Toddlers. Application of theo- 
ries of development of children up to age three 
in a care and stimulation practicum. Develop- 
ment of competencies and skills needed by in- 
fant/toddler specialists and professionals. 
Three hours seminar, 2 hours practicum. Pre- 
requisite: 404 or consent of instructor. 
407-3 to 9 (3 per topic) Diagnostic and 
Corrective Techniques for the Classroom 
Teacher. A presentation of diagnostic and 
remediation techniques with emphasis placed 
on appropriate methods and materials to be 
used in classrooms in the areas of (c) language 
arts, (e) mathematics, and (f) reading. Prereq- 
uisite: special methods course in field selected 
by student or consent of instructor. 
409-3 Creative Teaching. To assist preand 
in-service teachers in acquiring methods and 
materials that will improve instruction in the 
public school classroom, with special attention 
to the characteristics and needs of students. 
Prerequisite: EDUC 302. 

410-2 Creative Writing in the Public 
School. Techniques of encouraging creative 
writings in the schools. 

412-3 to 15 (3 per topic) Improvement of 
Instruction in Early Childhood Educa- 
tion (Preschool-Grade 3). Examines recent 
findings, current practices, and materials used 
in early childhood education in the fields of (c) 
language arts, (d) science, (e) mathematics, (f) 
reading, and (g) social studies. Prerequisite: 
specialized methods course for the field of 
study selected by the student. 
413-3 Language Development of the 
Young Child, 0-8. The normal language de- 
velopment and communication skills of the 
young child will be the focus of this course. 



Course Descriptions 

Attention will be given to an integrated, 
holistic philosophy toward development and 
learning in young children age 0-8. Specifically 
focusing upon social and environmental 
influences on the development of language and 
literacy, students will observe, listen, record, 
and analyze samples of young children's 
communication. 

414-3 Practicum in Parent-Child Study. 
Designed to increase student's ability to work 
with parents and parent groups through an 
awareness of factors in the parent-child rela- 
tionship and knowledge of current research 
and methods in parent education. Integration 
with infant and child development laborator- 
ies and related field experiences. Prerequisite: 
227, 237, or equivalent. 

415-3 Modern Approaches to Teaching 
Middle School Mathematics (Grades 4-8). 
Examines current mathematics materials and 
teaching approaches. Hands-on experience 
with a multitude of teaching aids including 
microcomputers and problem solving materi- 
als. Student exchange of ideas and discussion 
of activities for classroom use. Prerequisite: 315 
or consent of instructor. 

417-3 Administration of Pre-School Pro- 
grams. Planning and organizing programs 
for preschool or residential facilities including 
budgeting, staffing, programming, and evalu- 
ation. Prerequisite: 318 and 319. 
418-3 History and Philosophy of Early 
Childhood Education. A survey of the histo- 
ry and philosophies of early childhood educa- 
tion with its implication for current program 
practices. Students' analysis of their personal 
philosophy of early childhood education. Pre- 
requisite: 316, 318, senior or graduate standing. 
419-3 Parent Involvement in Education. 
Materials, techniques, and resources suitable 
for use by teachers in helping parents and 
teachers to understand how they can help each 
other in the partnership responsibilities of the 
education of children from a variety of 
backgrounds. Prerequisite: 317, student teach- 
ing, or consent of instructor. 
420-3 Teaching the Adult Functional Il- 
literate. The emphasis in the course is on un- 
derstanding the problems of the individual 
whose literacy level does not permit full partic- 
ipation in the economic, social, and civic op- 
portunity available to the majority of citizens. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 
423-3 Teaching Elementary School Eng- 
lish Language Arts. Oral and written com- 
munication processes with emphasis on the 
structure and process of the English language 
arts in the elementary school. Specific atten- 
tion to the fundamentals of speaking English, 
writing, spelling, and listening. Study of 
learning materials, specialized equipment, and 
resources. 

424-3 Teaching Elementary School So- 
cial Studies. Emphasis on the structure and 
process of teaching social studies in the ele- 
mentary school setting. Specific attention to 
the fundamentals of developing social studies 
objectives, planning units, developing a gener- 
al teaching model, organizing the curriculum, 



Curriculum and Instruction / 253 

and evaluating behavioral change. Study of 
learning materials, specialized equipment, and 
resources. 

426-3 An Introduction to Teaching Ele- 
mentary School Science. Content and meth- 
ods of elementary school sciences, grades K-8. 
Emphasis on the materials and strategies for 
using both traditional and modern techniques 
of science education. One or more field trips. 
427-4 Science Process and Concepts for 
Teachers of Grades N-8. (Same as Botany 
462.)Specifically designed to develop those 
cognitive processes and concepts needed by el- 
ementary school teachers in the teaching of 
modern science programs. Lecture three hours 
per week, laboratory two hours per week. One 
or two additional field trips required. 
428-3 Inquiry Skills for Teaching Junior 
and Senior High School Science. The ma- 
jor focus will be the application of inquiry skills 
as used in all areas of science instruction at the 
junior and senior high school levels. Students 
will be expected to demonstrate mastery of 
basic and integrated science process skills 
through conducting and reporting results of 
science investigations. 

435-3 Literature for Children. Studies 
types of literature; analysis of literary quali- 
ties; selection and presentation of books and 
other media for children; and integration of 
literature in preschool, elementary, and library 
settings. 

436-1 Bibliography and Literature of Ed- 
ucation. Introduction to the use of library re- 
sources for research in education. Includes 
bibliographies in education, periodical litera- 
ture, College of Education publications, disser- 
tation and thesis indexing services, and Edu- 
cational Resources Information Center (ERIC) 
materials. Students will learn to search the 
literature in preparation for literature review 
and will compile bibliographies in their own 
field of interest. 

437-3 Instructional Technology in Train- 
ing Programs in Business and Industry. 
Examines the role that performance and 
instructional technology plays in current 
training practices in business and industry. 
The organization, staffing, budgeting, and 
evaluation of training and development de- 
partments are presented. The kinds of per- 
formance problems typically encountered by 
corporate training departments are addressed. 
Field trips are expected. 

438-3 Introduction to Technical Services. 
Organization of library materials. Emphasis 
on cataloging and classification. Includes 
acquisition, processing, and circulation of 
materials. The Dewey Decimal classification 
system and Sears list of subject headings are 
stressed. Laboratory assignments. 
439-3 Basic Reference Sources. Introduc- 
tion to the principles and methods of reference 
work. Concentration on the study and exami- 
nation of the tools which form the basic refer- 
ence collection of the school and the communi- 
ty college library. 

440-3 Selection of School Library Media. 
Evaluation of print and non-print materials, 



254 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



resources and services; competencies for effi- 
cient purchasing and selecting of library ma- 
terials. Includes selection principles and prob- 
lems for elementary, secondary, and commu- 
ity college libraries. 

442-4 Administration of the School Me- 
dia Program. Functions and management of 
elementary and secondary school library me- 
dia programs with emphasis on services, per- 
sonnel, financial aspects, facilities, and evalu- 
ation. Current issues and trends as reflected in 
the literature. Field trips to school library 
media centers. 

445-3 Library Media for Young Adults. 
The selection and use of books and other edu- 
cational media for students in the junior high 
and senior high school. 

450-3 Photography for Teachers. Photog- 
raphy as a tool of communication in the mod- 
ern school. Techniques of camera handling, 
visually planning a story, macro-photography, 
and color slides. A $10 laboratory fee is 
required. 

451-3 Photographic Preparation of Edu- 
cational Media. Techniques of photography 
used in producing prints, overhead transpar- 
encies, daylight slides, high contrast materi- 
als, picture stories, filmstrips, and other photo- 
graphic instructional materials. A $10 labora- 
tory fee is required. Prerequisite: 450 or consent 
of instructor. 

452-3 Small Format Video Production in 
Education. An introduction to small format 
black and white and color video equipment in 
educational settings. Emphasis is on under- 
standing the role of video as an instructional 
and informational tool and on the principles of 
design that determine instructional video's 
effectiveness. 

453-3 Production of Educational Media I. 
Principles, skills, and techniques in the design 
and production of basic nonphotographic 
educational media. Experience includes ap- 
plying lettering, coloring, and mounting tech- 
niques to projected and nonprojected media. 
455-3 Design and Development of Self- 
Instruction Systems. Introduction to the 
theory and practice of self-instruction systems 
with a particular emphasis on the creation of 
instruction for mastery. Various self-instruc- 
tion systems are reviewed and procedures for 
designing, developing, and evaluating these 
systems are discussed. Includes planning a 
teaching unit and creating a self-instruction 
package for the unit. 

458-3 Classroom Teaching with Tele- 
vision. Classroom utilization of open and 
closed circuit television. Emphasis is placed 
on the changed role of the classroom teacher 
who uses television. Evaluation of program- 
ming, technicalities of ETV, and definition of 
responsibilities are included. Demonstration 
and a tour of production facilities are 
provided. 

462-3 Middle and Junior High School 
Programs. Focuses on the development of 
middle and junior high school curriculum and 
the identification of instructional activities 
which relate to the pre and early adolescent 
student. It is anticipated that the student will 



be able to plan and develop teaching units and 
evaluate procedures complementary to this 
portion of the school structure. 
464-2 Student Activities. Analysis of extra- 
class activities and programs in public schools 
with a focus on the status, trends, organiza- 
tion, administration, and problems. 
465-3 Advanced Teaching Methods. The 
focus is on a variety of teaching methods and 
strategies which are appropriate for secon- 
dary and post-secondary school educators. 
Both individual and group methods are 
emphasized. 

467-3 Methods and Materials in the Edu- 
cation of the Gifted. Content focuses on the 
most appropriate instructional strategies and 
materials to be utilized with the gifted. Time is 
spent practicing teaching models, designing 
materials, and developing teaching units. Em- 
phasis also is placed on techniques for individ- 
ualizing instruction for gifted and talented 
students. 

468-3 Science Methods for Junior and 
Senior High Schools. A performance-based 
approach to instructional skills common to 
teaching natural science at the junior and sen- 
ior high school levels. Three class hours and 
one micro teaching laboratory hour per week. 
Prerequisite: EDUC 302 or consent of 
instructor. 

469-3 Teaching Social Studies in the Sec- 
ondary School. Emphasis is placed upon in- 
structional strategies and curricular designs in 
social studies at the junior and senior high 
school levels. 

480-3 Introduction to Computer Based 
Education. Introduction to microcomputers 
and their uses in the classroom, including 
computer evolution, languages and authoring 
systems, instructional modalities, word pro- 
cessing, instructional management, and soft- 
ware evaluation. Utility functions and basic 
commands in programming are also 
introduced. 

481-3 Instructional Applications of 
Mainframe Computers. Design, develop- 
ment, and programming of computer-assisted 
instructional materials using interactive, time- 
sharing computer systems. Study of lesson 
design and programming, including branch- 
ing and program flow, display techniques, 
response judging, teaching strategies, or- 
ganization, and style. 

483-6 (3,3) Instructional Applications of 
Microcomputers. A study of the development 
and use of microcomputers and microcomputer 
systems in educational settings. Emphasis is 
upon the characteristics, capabilities, ap- 
plications, and implications of microcompu- 
ters and microcomputer lessons with case stud- 
ies of their integration into the teaching 
learning process. 

486-3 Instructional Authoring Systems. 
Designed to give experience in using authoring 
systems, languages and utilities for design, 
production and integration of computeras- 
sisted instruction into educational settings. 
Tools will include Superpilot, Author, and var- 
ious commercial and consortium authoring 
tools. Prerequisite: 480 or consent of instructor. 



Course Descriptions 



Curriculum and Instruction / 255 



495-2 to 8 Field Experience. Supervised 
learning experiences in community nursery 
schools and public agencies. Eight hours max- 
imum for students enrolled in preschool certifi- 
cation specialization only. Other students lim- 
ited to an enrollment of six hours maximum. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
496-2 to 6 (2 to 4 per semester) Field Study 
Abroad. Orientation and study before travel, 
readings, reports, and planned travel. Includes 
visits to cultural and educational institutions. 
Maximum credit hours in any term is 4. 
498-1 to 15 (1 to 3 per topic) Workshops in 
Education. Acquaints teachers within a 
single school system or in a closely associated 
cluster of school systems with underlying as- 
sumptions and practical considerations in- 
volved with the implementation of new pro- 
grams and practices in each of the following 
areas: (a) curriculum, (b) supervision for in- 
structional improvement, (c) language arts, (d) 
science, (e) mathematics, (f) reading, (g) social 
studies, (h) early childhood, (i) elementary 
education, (j) the middle school, (k) secondary 
education, (1) school library media, (m) in- 
struction, (n) educational technology, (o) envi- 
ronmental education, (p) children's literature, 
(q) family studies, (r) computer based educa- 
tion, (s) gifted and talented education, and (t) 
teaching education. Maximum of six hours to- 
ward a master's degree. Prerequisite: consent 
of instructor. 

500-3 Introduction to Research Methods 
in Education. An introduction to re- 
search methodology as it is applied in carrying 
out educational studies. Basic skills of 
planning, executing, and reporting educa- 
tional research will be studied and applied, 
with the construction of a research proposal as 
a term project. 

501-3 Organization and Administration 
of Reading Programs. For reading 
specialists, consultants, supervisors, and in- 
structional leaders. Recent trends in or- 
ganization, administration of reading pro- 
grams, K-community college; materials, 
equipment, budget for special programs; study 
of roles of various personnel; and in-service 
preparation programs. Specific problems of 
class members are studied. Prerequisite: 512 or 
561. 

503-3 Introduction to the Curriculum. 
Deals with the nature, purposes, and functions 
of curriculum planning and development; cur- 
riculum design and organizations; curriculum 
implementation and maintenance; and curric- 
ulum evaluation as each component relates to 
the total curriculum. 

504-3 Systematic Approaches to Instruc- 
tion. Gives graduate students an opportunity 
to investigate, discuss, and apply systematic 
approaches to instruction. Special emphasis is 
given to that element of the instructional 
system which allows for the integration of in- 
structional media into the process. 
506-3 Professional Services for Diverse 
Family Structures. Case analysis of differ- 
ent family structures through seminar teams. 
Each team will be responsible for analysis of 
the interaction of the family structure and the 



economic, nutritional, and socializing activi- 
ties carried out within the family-household. 
Role and sources of assistance through current 
programs will be included. Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. 

507-3 Impact of Public Intervention on 
Family Life. An analysis of implications of 
pending and existing legislation as it relates to 
the economic, nutritional, and interactive- 
aspects of the family treated as a system. Pre- 
requisite: consent of instructor. 
508-3 Systematic Observation and Anal- 
ysis of Instruction. Students will learn 
to use conferencing techniques and to con- 
struct and use valid and reliable systematic 
observation instruments to provide the basis 
for analysis and feedback about classroom 
instruction. 

509-3 Foundations of Environmental 
Education. Designed specifically to provide 
teachers, administrators, and curriculum spe- 
cialists with the knowledge and skills neces- 
sary to implement environmental education 
strategies in both elementary and middle 
schools. Includes work in ecological founda- 
tions, programs currently in use, unit designs, 
methods, and research. One or two field trips 
may be required. 

510-3 Values Education Curriculum. Al- 
ternative views of the impact of schooling on 
children's values will be explored. Current cur- 
ricular approaches to moral education will be 
examined with special emphasis given to val- 
ues clarification and the cognitive-develop- 
mental approach of Lawrence Kohlberg. Psy- 
chological and philosophical assumptions 
underlying the major approaches to moral 
education will be critically examined. 
511-3 Seminar in Psychology of Elemen- 
tary School Subjects. Psychological princi- 
ples of learning theories as applied to the mas- 
tery of materials used in elementary and early 
childhood education school subjects. Empha- 
sis is placed on implications of theories of 
learning for curriculum development and 
instruction. 

512-3 Reading in the Elementary School. 
First course in the reading sequence. Survey of 
the reading process. Introduction to factors 
affecting the reading process, the common core 
of skills, teaching strategies, materials, and 
research. 

513-3 Kindergarten-Primary Reading. A 
survey of problems and methodology in the 
developmental reading program for the pri- 
mary grades. Emphasis placed upon pre- 
vention of reading difficulties. 
514-3 The Pre-School Child. Growth of the 
child from birth to six years with emphasis on 
the various aspects of growth and the 
interrelationships. 

515-3 Advanced Remediation in Mathe- 
matics. Strategies for the design of prescribed 
systematic instruction for correcting identified 
mathematics difficulties. Experience in de- 
signing and preparing materials for corrective 
purposes. Prerequisite:407E or consent of 
instructor. 

516-3 Teaching Mathematics in the Ele- 
mentary School. Masters degree level 



256 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



course which acquaints the student with ap- 
proaches to teaching, development of curricu- 
lum materials, and authoritative positions on 
the mathematics of grades K-8. Emphasis on 
teaching aids, problem solving, and recent de- 
velopments at this level. Prerequisite: 315 or 
consent of instructor. 

517-3 Early Childhood Programs: Or- 
ganization and Administration. Presents 
an overview of the organization and adminis- 
tration of programs for children ages three to 
eight with experiences in planning for operat- 
ing and administering such programs. Prereq- 
uisite: 316, 518, or consent of instructor. 
518-3 Early Childhood Curriculum and 
Methods. A survey of current problems and 
practices in early childhood education for chil- 
dren from three to eight years of age, with em- 
phasis on reading in current research litera- 
ture. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 
519-3 Early Child Development Through 
Home and Preschool. The normal health 
development of children as it takes place in the 
home and is promoted by the curriculum of 
early childhood facilities. 
520-3 The Language Arts in Bilingual 
Classrooms. Designed for the teacher who 
wants to develop the expertise necessary to 
provide appropriate language arts activities 
for children in a bior multi-lingual classroom. 
Specific areas covered include the basics of 
second language learning, assessment of lan- 
guage ability, high motivation language de- 
velopment activities, resource identification 
and utilization, and evaluation of performance 
and of available materials, textbooks, and 
equipment. 

521-8 (4,4) Diagnosis and Correction of 
Reading Disabilities. Causes of reading dif- 
ficulties, observation and interview proce- 
dures; standardized tests, instruments, and in- 
formal inventories; analysis techniques; 
experiences in preparing materials for cor- 
rective purposes. Each student diagnoses and 
treats a reading disability case under super- 
vision. Prerequisite: 512 or 561 and consent of 
instructor. 

522-3 Teaching Reading Skills to Col- 
lege Students. Designed to discuss, develop, 
and demonstrate techniques of teaching read- 
ing skills to college students. A very 
important aspect of this course is practical 
tutoring sections. Prerequisite: permission of 
instructor. 

523-3 Language Arts in the Elementary 
School. The practical bearing of investigation 
and theory on the improvement of current 
practices in the teaching of the language arts 
other than reading. Attention given to evalua- 
tion of teaching materials in these areas. Pre- 
requisite: 423. 

524-3 Teaching the Social Studies in the 
Elementary School. A study of theory and 
practices of teaching and developing pro- 
grams in elementary school social studies. 
Particular attention to be given to trends and 
issues in social studies. Various social studies 
models will be examined and evaluated for 
practical use. Students must demonstrate be- 
haviorally the competencies and skills related 



to successful performance in the teaching of 
social studies. 

525-3 Applications of Microcomputers to 
Mathematics Education. Emphasis placed 
on using the microcomputer as a tool in prob- 
lem solving. Instruction in programming in 
Pascal and operating the Apple microcomput- 
er with special attention to practical use of ma- 
terials in the mathematics classroom and ex- 
ploration of various other uses of the 
microcomputer. 

526-3 Problems in Elementary School 
Science Education. Emphasis upon identi- 
fying problems and trends within elementary 
school science education and planning for re- 
search in this field. Prerequisite: 426. 
527-3 Advanced Family Studies. A study of 
factors that promote satisfactions with the 
immediate family; planning and preparing 
teaching units, and source materials in this 
field. 

528-3 Methods for Teaching Mathematics 
in the Preschool and Early Childhood 
Grades (Pre K-3). Acquaints the student 
with the learning characteristics of children 
and teaching methods at grades pre K-3. Em- 
phasis on concrete manipulative teaching 
aids, learning readiness, and diagnosis of 
learning difficulties. Prerequisite: 315 or con- 
sent of instructor. 

529-3 Modern Approaches to Teaching 
Secondary School Mathematics. (Same as 
Mathematics 511.) Topics will include problem 
solving, applications of mathematics, and 
teaching proofs in secondary school mathe- 
matics. Practical classroom use of materials 
will also be emphasized. Prerequisite: consent 
of instructor. 

530-3 Teaching Problem Solving in 
School Mathematics (Grades K-8). De- 
signed to acquaint teachers with problem solv- 
ing processes and how to integrate problem 
solving into their teaching. Emphasis is placed 
on teaching the process of problem solving. 
Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of 
adviser. 

531-3 The Elementary School Curricu- 
lum. An introductory course in curriculum de- 
signed to assist teachers and administrators in 
making operational decisions in elementary 
education which are based on knowledge of 
foundations of elementary education, organi- 
zation of learning experiences, research in spe- 
cialized areas, materials and methods, in- 
structional programming and evaluation. 
Students are required to exhibit curriculum 
competencies through the creation of products 
and through demonstration of skill. 
532-3 Courseware Design and Analysis. 
The analysis of principles and strategies em- 
ployed in the design of computer based course- 
ware and computer based training materials. 
Emphasis is upon examining educational, so- 
cial, and psychological learning principles and 
the assumptions used by authors of computer 
software in the design of K-12 software and 
computer based training materials. 
533-3 Instructional Leadership in Ele- 
mentary Education. A study of research 
and related literature concerning various in- 



Course Descriptions 



Curriculum and Instruction / 257 



structional leadership styles and behaviors. 
Major attention is given to such behaviors as 
they apply to the local school and the individu- 
al classroom situation. 

534-3 Organization of the Elementary 
School. An analysis of types of elementary 
school organizations with special attention to 
influence of school organization upon the edu- 
cational program. Application of research 
findings to selection and use of materials of 
instruction. Special consideration to classroom 
teacher's professional problems. 
538-3 Organization of the Nonbook Col- 
lection. The application of standard library 
techniques to the organization, storage, distri- 
bution, and physical processing of all types of 
nonbook materials with emphasis on catalog- 
ing and classification. Prerequisite: 438. 
539-3 Reference Services of the Media 
Program. Designed to round out the student's 
preparation for reference work in an ele- 
mentary school, secondary school, or commu- 
nity college media program. The techniques of 
developing a reference service with attention to 
the needs of special user groups. Preparation of 
bibliographies on subjects of current topical 
interest and a term project on a specific issue or 
problem. Prerequisite: 439. 
540-3 Mass Communication in Educa- 
tion. The communication theories of recogniz- 
ed authorities in the field will be studied. These 
theories will be applied to the use of mass me- 
dia in education. Radio, television, comic 
books, newspapers, magazines, and motion 
pictures will be discussed. 
542-3 Administration of an Educational 
Media Center. Designed to further the train- 
ing of specialists in selected issues associated 
with the supervision and management of inte- 
grated programs of media services. Current 
and emerging administrative roles, responsi- 
bilities, and practices are examined in the con- 
text of providing effective and efficient services 
to media users. Prerequisite: 442 or consent of 
instructor. 

543-3 Automation of Information Cen- 
ters. A study of selected retrospective, current, 
and emerging characteristics, capabilities, 
applications, and implications of automation 
to information centers located in public 
schools, colleges, communities, government 
agencies, and the private sector. 
544-3 Community College Media Pro- 
grams. A survey of community college media 
programs in the U.S., their philosophy and ob- 
jectives, practices and procedures, and re- 
search in the field. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

546-3 The Library of Congress Classifica- 
tion Scheme. The study of the Library of Con- 
gress classification scheme as it is utilized in 
community college libraries. Prerequisite: 438. 
548-3 Production of Educational Media 
II. Advanced use of audio, graphic, and photo- 
graphic principles and techniques applied to 
the design and production of educational me- 
dia to meet specific objectives. Includes appli- 
cation of a basic model of the design process. A 
$10 laboratory fee is required. Prerequisite: 453 
and 450 or consent of instructor. 



549-2 Designing Multi-Image Learning 
Materials. The acquisition of skills in design- 
ing, producing, and showing multi-image 
learning materials. Students should possess 
photographic skills and a 35 mm camera. A 
$10 laboratory fee is required. 
551-3 Survey of Research and Develop- 
ments in Educational Media. Survey of 
research, research techniques, needed re- 
search, and new developments and programs 
in educational media. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

553-3 Instructional Development. In 
tended for media specialists and instructional 
developers, this course applies current research 
and technology to the solution of instructional 
problems. The student is guided through the 
systematic process of identifying instructional 
problems, specifying objectives, analyzing 
tasks and learners, organizing resources, 
specifying methods and media, and assessing 
outcomes. The role of the instructional 
developer as a helping professional will also be 
examined. Prerequisite: 504. 
554-3 Utilization of Educational Media. 
The utilization of print and nonprint materials 
in instructional implementation and cur- 
riculum development. Structured for teachers, 
media directors, administrators, and instruc- 
tional designers. The increasing role of tech- 
nological advances in education is stressed as 
they relate to learning theory and curriculum 
development. 

555-3 Visual Communication. How to com- 
municate with pictures in the classroom, the 
design of still and motion pictures, pictures 
used in teaching perception, and the place of 
pictures in advertising and communication. 
556-3 Learning Discovery Systems in the 
Computerized Classroom. Survey and use 
of learning discovery systems for micro- 
computers, especially LOGO. Course includes 
microcomputer operation, software utilization, 
program evaluation, creation and use of 
microworlds in the classroom, and cross-cur- 
riculum applications. Prerequisite: 480 or con- 
sent of instructor. 

560-3 Instructional Television. The field 
of educational broadcasting is explored, with 
special emphasis on public and school tele- 
vision. History and philosophy are included. 
Problems of programming and their effect on 
society are studied. The relationship between 
broadcasting and the viewing public is 
investigated, and the responsibility of each is 
established. Emphasis is also placed upon 
principles of ITV administration and inservice 
training. 

561-3 Reading in the Secondary School. 
For the junior and senior high school teachers 
who desire a foundation in reading. Emphasis 
placed on the basic skills appraisal of reading 
abilities, materials of instruction, and methods 
of teaching reading in the content areas. 
564-3 Curriculum Development for Gift- 
ed Students. Presentations related to the 
knowledge and decision-making required to 
develop curriculum for gifted students, in- 
cluding philosophy, goals, and objectives: de- 
signing and sequencing activities; curriculum 



258 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



models for gifted students; evaluation and 
modification of curriculum. Emphasis is 
placed on the development of curriculum for 
gifted students to be used in schools. 
566-3 Instructional Strategies for Prob- 
lem Solving. The focus is on developing those 
teaching strategies which will foster and 
enhance problem solving skills and heuristic 
thinking. Representative of these teaching 
skills would be inductive and deductive ap- 
proaches, discovery and inquiry techniques, 
and questioning strategies. 
569-3 Principles and Trends in Secon- 
dary School Social Studies Education. An 
evaluation and study of social studies trends 
and practices as they are related to curriculum, 
organization, and instruction at the junior and 
senior high school and community college 
levels. 

571-3 Secondary School Curriculum. An 
introductory course designed to explore the na- 
ture and development of the curriculum at the 
secondary school level. Historical perspective 
and foundations of curriculum are examined. 
Functional applications to the public secon- 
dary schools are emphasized. 
572-2 History and Philosophy of Bilin- 
gual/Bicultural Education. Surveys major 
influences in the development of bilingual bi- 
cultural education in the United States and 
presents the major philosophical positions af- 
fecting this development. Students will also 
choose one or more specific related areas for 
concentrated investigation. 
573-3 Perspectives on the Future and Its 
Schools. Deals with the future development of 
education and social trends which will influ- 
ence that development. Emphasis is placed 
upon alternative models of education and their 
social bases. 

574-2 Psycho- and Sociolinguistic Con- 
siderations in a Bilingual/Bicultural 
Classroom. Acquaints educators with 
possible sources of psycholinguistic and 
sociolinguistic problems in the bilingual 
classroom and equips them with techniques for 
utilizing, modifying, and counteracting those 
influences. 

575-3 Critical Issues in Instructional Su- 
pervision. Students will examine the history. 
nature, and evolution of supervision for in- 
structional improvement. Students will be in- 
troduced to concepts, theory, and research 
findings from many fields of study that have 
implications for today's supervisory process. 
Supervisory assumptions and practices will be 
examined in light of current knowledge of 
teaching effectiveness. 

576-3 Critical Issues in Teacher Edu- 
cation. Students will examine critical 
issues, problems, and trends in teacher 
education. Emphasis is placed on strategies for 
clarifying the issues, solving the problems, 
and examining the possible impact of the 
trends. 

577-3 Seminar in International Mathe- 
matics in Education. Deals with goals, con- 
tents, teaching methods, teacher training, cur- 
riculum development, and research literature 
on mathematics education at the internation- 



al level. Prerequisite: graduate standing or 
consent of adviser. 

578-3 Advanced Study of Mathematics 
Education. Study of the practical and 
theoretical development of mathematics cur- 
ricula and instruction, and viewing mathe- 
matics curricula and instruction from 
philosophical and psychological perspectives. 
Prerequisite: advanced graduate study or 
consent of adviser. 

580-3 Current Trends in Education. 
Trends, issues, problems in education related 
to the student, program, school organization, 
staff, material and media, the school building, 
and the process of innovation and change. 
582-3 Advanced Research Methods in 
Education. The study and application of ad- 
vanced skills used in planning, executing, re- 
porting, and utilizing educational research. 
Prerequisite: 500 or evidence of equivalent re- 
search competencies. 

583-3 Instructional Theory, Principles, 
and Practices. Presentation of conceptual 
formulations and skills concerning instruc- 
tional theory and principles: foundations of in- 
struction: instructional systems and models: 
delivery processes (logistics), systems, and 
maintenance of quality control: and evalua- 
tion of teachers and students. 
584-3 Curriculum Theory, Foundations, 
and Principles. Presentation of conceptual 
formulations concerning curriculum theory 
and propositions; foundations: philosophy, 
sociology, and learning theories: the cur- 
riculum system and its components: crucial 
issues in developing a curriculum theory: and 
theoretical curriculum models: analysis and 
assessment. 

585-1 to 15 (1 to 3 per semester) Topical 
Seminar. A graduate level seminar that in- 
volves the study of special problems and relat- 
ed research associated with practical educa- 
tional situations. Problems available for 
critiquing and analyzing are the following: (a) 
curriculum, (b) supervision for instructional 
improvement, (c) language arts, (d) science, (e) 
mathematics, (f) reading, (g) social studies, (h) 
early childhood education, (i) elementary edu- 
cation, (j) the middle school, (k) secondary ed- 
ucation, (1) school library media, (m) instruc- 
tion, (n) educational technology, (o) environ- 
mental education, (p) children's literature, and 
(q) family studies, (r) computer based edu- 
cation, (s) gifted and talented education, (t) 
teacher education. Maximum of six hours to- 
ward a master's degree. Prerequisite: consent 
of instructor. 

586-3 Curriculum Design and Develop- 
ment. Presentations concerning educational 
planning and curricular decision-making re- 
lating to curriculum:aims. goals, and objec- 
tives; nature of knowledge, disciplines, and 
subjects; curriculum structures: sequence and 
scope; substantive structural models: content 
and activity selection, product analysis and 
production; evaluation; and curriculum modi- 
fication and change. 

587-3 Curriculum Implementation and 
Evaluation. Attention is given to preparing 
the curriculum specialist to use appropriate 



Course Descriptions 



Curriculum and Instruction / 259 



techniques and skills to put curriculum pro- 
grams into practice and to assess the effective- 
ness of such programs in terms of a wide range 
of variables which indicate success or need for 
curricular modification. 

589-3 The Work of the Director of Cur- 
riculum and Instruction. The role of the di- 
rector of curriculum and instruction is the fo- 
cus of this course. Such topics as the 
background, current status, and tasks and 
functions of the position are examined. 
Additionally, such broad areas of the director's 
role as needs assessment, program planning 
and evaluation, and in-service education 
planning are covered. Prerequisite: 586 or 587 
or consent of instructor. 

590-1 to 15 (1 to 3 per topic) Independent 
Readings. Directed readings in literature and 
research in one of the following areas: (a) cur- 
riculum, (b) supervision* for instructional im- 
provement, (c) language arts, (d) science, (e) 
mathematics, (f) reading, (g) social studies, (h) 
early childhood, (i) elementary education, (j) 
middle school, (k) secondary education, (1) 
school library media, (m) instruction, (n) edu- 
cational technology, (o) environmental educa- 
tion, (p) children's literature, (q) family studies, 
(r) computer based education, (s) gifted and 
talented education, and (t) teacher education. 
Maximum of four hours toward a master's 
degree. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
593-1 to 15 (1 to 3 per topic) Individual 
Research in Education. The selection, in- 
vestigation, and writing of a research topic un- 
der the personal supervision of a member of the 
departmental graduate staff, in one of the 
following areas: (a) curriculum, (b) supervision 
for instructional improvement, (c) language 
arts, (d) science, (e) mathematics, (f) reading, 
(g) social studies, (h) early childhood, (i) 
elementary education, (j) middle school, (k) 
secondary education, (1) school library media, 
(m) instruction, (n) educational technology, (o) 
environmental education, (p) children's lit- 
erature, (q) family studies, (r) computer based 
education, (s) gifted and talented education, 
and (t) teacher education. Maximum of three 
hours counted toward a master's degree. Pre- 
requisite: consent of instructor. 
594-(2 to 9 per topic) Practicum. For mas- 
ter's degree students: professional consulta- 
tion, teaching demonstration, practical appli- 
cation of advanced theory, work with clinical 
cases, or program development implementa- 
tion, and evaluation in school systems, com- 
munity colleges, or universities. In addition, 
may involve reading and research directed to 
special problems involved in on-site situ- 
ations. Practicum is available in the following 
areas: (a) curriculum, (b) supervision for in- 
structional improvement, (c) language arts, (d) 
science, (e) mathematics, (f) reading, (g) social 
studies, (h) early childhood, (i) elementary 
education, (j) middle school, (k) secondary ed- 
ucation, (1) school library media, (m) instruc- 
tion, (n) educational technology, (o) environ- 
mental education, (p) children's literature, (q) 
family studies, (r) computer based education, 
(s) gifted and talented education, and (t) teach- 



er education. A maximum of nine hours credit 
may be applied toward a master's degree. Pre- 
requisite: consent of instructor. 
595-(2 to 8 per topic) Internship. Culmi- 
nating experience for Ph.D. or specialist degree 
students. Students engage in specialized serv- 
ice areas either in their own or a cooperating 
school or school system or university. Weekly 
on-campus or on-site seminar will be held with 
the intern supervisor. Internship areas are: (a) 
curriculum, (b) supervision for instructional 
improvement, (c) language arts, (d) science, (e) 
mathematics, (f) reading, (g) social studies, (h) 
early childhood, (i) elementary education, (j) 
middle school, (k) secondary education, (1) 
school library media, (m) instruction, (n) 
educational media, (o) environmental edu- 
cation, (p) children's literature, (q) family 
studies, (r) computer based education, (s) gifted 
and talented education, and (t) teacher edu- 
cation. A maximum of eight hours credit may 
be applied toward a Ph.D. or specialist degree. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
596-3 to 6 Independent Investigation. 
Field study required of each student pursuing 
for the sixth year specialist degree. The work 
should be conducted in the setting of the edu- 
cational system in which the student is em- 
ployed or where cooperation is extended. The 
study involves selecting the problem, survey of 
pertinent literature, recording results, and 
appropriate interpretations and summariza- 
tions. Graded S/ U only. Prerequisite: consent 
of instructor and admission to sixth-year spe- 
cialist degree program. 

599-1 to 6 Thesis. Minimum of three hours to 
be counted toward a master's degree. Prerequi- 
site: admission to master's degree program. 
600-1 to 32 (1 to 12 per semester) Disser- 
tation. Minimum of 24 hours for the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree. 

601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 
register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/U or DEF only. 



Economics 



408-3 Economics and Business Statistics 

II. A continuation of 308 which includes the 
construction, interpretation, and use of eco- 
nomic data. Topics include correlation, regres- 
sion, decision making, index numbers, time se- 
ries analysis, forecasting, and other statistical 
techniques used in analyzing economic and 
business data. No graduate credit for econom- 
ics majors. Prerequisite: 308 or equivalent. 
416-3 Money and Banking II. An examina- 
tion of the principal institutions whose joint 
actions determine the supply of money in the 



260 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



United States economy. Emphasis is placed on 
the commercial bank operating as a firm 
within the Federal Reserve System. Policy is- 
sues are examined for the regulation of the 
banking industry as well as for the control of 
the domestic money supply. Prerequisite: 315 
or 340 or 341 or consent of instructor. 
419-3 Latin American Economic Devel- 
opment. Special attention to contemporary 
policy issues and alternative strategies for de- 
velopment. Among the topics included are in- 
flation and financial reform, international 
trade and economic integration, foreign in- 
vestment and agrarian reform. Prerequisite: 
322 or 340 or 341 or consent of instructor. 
420-3 The History of American Growth 
in the 20th Century. An analytical survey of 
American growth in the present century. 
Concentrates on problems associated with the 
United States' role as a world economic power 
and changes in economic institutions engen- 
dered by rapid technological change and the 
need to cope with such problems as income 
distribution, equity, the growing public sector, 
inflation, unemployment, and others. Prerequi- 
site: 340 or 341 or consent of instructor. 
425-4 Economics in Geography and 
Planning. (Same as Geography 422.) Con- 
cepts, symbols, language, theory, elementary 
mathematics of economics and geography. In- 
dividual's preferences, production functions, 
the firm, markets, optimality, externalities, 
and welfare economics. Elementary mathe- 
matics of time and intertemporal criteria. Pre- 
requisite: GEOG 300 or consent of instructor. 
429-3 International Trade and Finance. 
Analysis of the pattern and volume of world 
trade and capital flows; effects of trade and 
payments on the domestic economy; problems 
and methods of adjusting to change in the bal- 
ance of payments. Prerequisite: 340, 341, and 
MATH 117, or 140, or 150, or consent of 
instructor. 

431-3 Public Finance II. State and local. 
Analysis of the economic effects, problems, 
and alternative solutions concerning state and 
local government expenditures, revenues, and 
debt. Prerequisite: 330, or 340, or 341, or consent 
of instructor. 

436-3 Government and Labor. (Same as 
Political Science 428. influence of government 
and law on collective bargaining, on the 
internal operation of unions and on job dis- 
crimination in the public and private sectors. 
Prerequisite: GE-B 211 and 212 or equivalents 
or consent of instructor. 

440-3 Price, Output, and Allocation 
Theories. A systematic survey of theories of 
product prices, wage rates, rates of production 
and resource utilization under conditions of 
competition, monopolistic competition, oligo- 
poly, and monopoly markets. Emphasis is on 
developing analytical tools useful in the social 
sciences. Not open to students who have had 
Economics 340. Prerequisite: 215 or consent of 
instructor. 

441-3 Contemporary Macroeconomic 
Theory. An examination of the causes of in- 
flation, unemployment, and fluctuations in 
aggregate economic activity factors affecting 



consumption and investment, and the sources 
of economic growth. Emphasis is on under- 
standing contemporary United States macroe- 
conomic problems and the options for fiscal, 
monetary, and incomes policies facing the 
United States government. Not open to stu- 
dents who have had 341. Prerequisite: 214 or 
consent of instructor. 

443-3 Honors Seminar in Economics. Ap- 
plication of the tools of economic analysis to 
the study of contemporary social problems. 
Enrollment limited to economics majors who 
have a minimum cumulative grade point aver- 
age of 3.0 or higher in all prior economics cour- 
ses. Economics graduate students are not per- 
mitted to enroll in this course. Prerequisite: 340, 
341, and MATH 117, or 140, or 150, or consent 
of instructor. 

450-3 History of Economic Thought. An 
analytical study of the development of eco- 
nomic ideas, with special reference to historical 
and societal context, central thrust, and 
impact. Such benchmark figures as Smith, 
Marx, Marshall, Veblen, and Keynes are high- 
lighted and major schools of economic thought 
are identified. Prerequisite: 214 and 215; or GE- 
B 211; or consent of instructor. 
465-4 Mathematical Economics I. A sys- 
tematic survey of mathematical economics. 
Application of basic mathematical tools to ec- 
onomic analysis, and a restatement of eco- 
nomic theory in mathematical terms. Prereq- 
uisite: 340 or 440, and MATH 117 or 140, or 
consent of instructor. 

467-3 Mathematical Statistics in Eco- 
nomics. Introduction to the use of statistical 
inference and distribution theory for measur- 
ing and testing economic theory. Prerequisite: 
MATH 117, 140 or 150, or consent of instructor. 
471-3 Land Resource Economics. (See 
Agribusiness Economics 440.) 
474-3 Antitrust and Regulation. The theo- 
ry and practice of government policy toward 
imperfectly competitive markets. Includes 
such topics as merger policy, unfair trade prac- 
tices, regulation of natural monopolies, peak 
load pricing, safety and environmental regu- 
lation, and consumer protection. Prerequisite: 
374, or 340, or consent of instructor. 
479-3 Problems in Business and Eco- 
nomics. Application of economic theory and 
tools of analysis to practical business prob- 
lems. Cost and demand functions, and fore- 
casting are analyzed from a policy standpoint. 
Prerequisite: 215; 308 or Administrative Sci- 
ences 208; MKTG 304; MATH 117, or 140, or 
150, or consent of instructor. 
481-3 Comparative Economic Systems. 
Capitalism, socialism, communism, and other 
forms of social organization are examined 
from a theoretical point of view. Economic and 
social theories from Adam Smith and Karl 
Marx to Milton Friedman and Paul Sweezy 
will be examined. Prerequisite: 340 or 440 or 
consent of instructor. 

500-3 to 24 (3 per topic) Economics Semi- 
nar. A study of a common, general topic in the 
field of economics with individual reports on 
special topics. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 



Course Descriptions 



Economics / 261 



501-1 to 21 Economics Readings. Read- 
ings from books and periodicals in economics. 
Master's degree students limited to a total of 
six hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor 
and chair. 

502-1 to 4 Readings in Resource Eco- 
nomics. (See Forestry 590.) 
507-1 to 4 (1,1,1,1) Practicum in Under- 
graduate Teaching. Emphasizes teaching 
methods, source materials, and preparation of 
classroom materials. All teaching assistants 
must enroll. One hour of credit per semester. 
Graded S U only. 

510-2 Research in Economics: Design, 
Methodology, and Presentation. System- 
atic approach to economic research. Includes 
research planning and design, exploration of 
the various sources of data, and most frequent- 
ly used methodology. The last part of the 
course is concentrated on techniques for com- 
municating the results of research. Prerequi- 
site: consent of instructor. 
511-3 Advanced Mathematical Econom- 
ics. A continuation of topics in 465 with more 
emphasis on proofs. Topics include economic 
applications of integration, differential equa- 
tions, and real analysis. Prerequisite: 465 and 
MATH 211, or consent of the instructor. 
512-3 Seminar in Labor Institutions. 
Multi-disciplinary approach to collective bar- 
gaining in the private and public sectors, con- 
sidering industrial relations theory, and the 
economic effects of collective bargaining. 
Readings and cases. Prerequisite: 310 or equiv- 
alent or consent of instructor. 
517-3 Monetary Theory and Policy. A 
survey of contemporary monetary theory and 
related policy issues. Prerequisite: 541 or con- 
sent of instructor. 

518-3 Monetary Theory and Policy II. 
Contemporary topics in monetary theory and 
policy, including analysis of the roles of money 
in inflation and economic growth, and an 
appraisal of the conduct and impact of mone- 
tary policy. Prerequisite: 517 or consent of 
instructor. 

520-6 (3,3) Economic Development Theo- 
ry and Policy, (a) Classical, neoclassical, and 
modern contributions to the theory of de- 
velopment; theories of underdevelopment, (b) 
Basic approaches to economic development; 
laissez-faire; balanced growth; unbalanced 
growth, role of government; methods of plan- 
ning; and foreign aid. Must be taken in a,b, 
sequence. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
522-3 Microeconomic Foundations of La- 
bor Markets. The approach is theoretical. 
Topics include the theory of wage and employ- 
ment determination, labor mobility, labor 
market imperfections, the special problems of 
minority group labor, and trade union issues. 
Prerequisite: 538, or 540b, or consent of 
instructor. 

525-4 Seminar in Economics in Geogra- 
phy and Planning. (Same as Geography 
522.)Public expenditure criteria based on free- 
market allocation, public, private, and merit 
goods and services, and related planning; ex- 
penditure criteria based on comprehensive 
plans; expenditure criteria and planning in 



the absence of general optimality; multiple ob- 
jectives, measurement of benefits and costs. 
shadow prices, choice of techniques in plan- 
ning; consideration of uncertainty. Critical 
evaluations of applied work and models of de- 
velopment projects and programs by students. 
Prerequisite: 422 or consent of instructor. 
530-3 Foreign Trade. Emphasis on the ad- 
vanced theory of international trade, survey of 
significant literature in international theory. 
Study of more advanced tools of analysis. Pre- 
requisite: 340, or 440, or consent of instructor. 
531-3 International Finance. Application 
of theory to current international economic de- 
velopments. Empirical studies. Prerequisite: 
329 or consent of instructor. 
532-3 Economics of Human Resources. 
The study of institutions and policies designed 
to solve manpower problems. Emphasizes 
such topical areas as unemployment, under- 
employment, manpower training and develop- 
ment, labor market behavior, vocational edu- 
cation, labor problems of the handicapped, the 
aged, women, and minority groups, health eco- 
nomics, economics of education and poverty. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
533-3 Public Finance Theory and 
Practice. Historical development of public 
finance theories with analysis of their policy 
implications. Prerequisite: 330 or consent of 
instructor. 

534-3 Economics of Taxation. This course 
examines from a theoretical and applied point- 
of-view, various economic aspects of taxation. 
Other government revenue sources may also 
be analyzed such as inter-governmental grants 
and debt. Emphasis is on application of 
microeconomic theory to problems in taxation. 
Usual topics include:equity in taxation, shift- 
ing and incidence of taxes, excess burden of 
taxes, other economic effects of taxes, tax re- 
form, debt. Prerequisite: 330 and 340, or 440, or 
consent of instructor. 

540A-3 Microeconomic Theory I. The 
course provides the basic theoretical knowl- 
edge necessary for microeconomic research in 
business and government. Prerequisite: 340, or 
400, or consent of instructor. 
540B-3 Microeconomic Theory II. A con- 
temporary course in partial equilibrium analy- 
sis. Topics include the theory of the firm, mar- 
ket structure, and the theory of the consumer. 
The course frequently takes an axiomatic ap- 
proach; consequently there are many formal 
statements and proofs of theorems. Prerequi- 
site: 465 and MATH 221, or MATH 150, 221, 
and 250, or consent of instructor. 
540C-3 Microeconomic Theory III. A con- 
temporary course in general equilibrium anal- 
ysis. Topics include equilibrium in an ex- 
change economy, equilibrium with production, 
and welfare implications of general equi- 
librium. The existence and uniqueness of equi- 
librium and the concept of the core of an econo- 
my are studied in detail. Prerequisite: 511, 540B 
or MATH 352, or consent of instructor. 
541-6 (3,3) Macroeconomic Theory I and 
II. Taken in a, b sequence except with consent 
of instructor. Prerequisite: 341 or 441 or consent 
of instructor. 



262 Graduate Catalog 



Chapter 3 



542-6 (3,3) Industrial organization, (a) In- 
dustrial organization I. A study of the variety 
of forms of competition among firms. Topics 
include theories of the firm, oligopoly theory, 
theories of entry, product differentiation, and 
innovation. Prerequisites: 440 and 441. (b) In- 
dustrial organization II. A survey of govern- 
ment policy toward industry. Topics include 
antitrust: mergers, concentration and unfair 
trade practices, regulation of public utilities, 
peak load pricing, product, safety, and envi- 
ronmental regulation. Prerequisites: 440 and 
441. 

545-3 Resource Economics. A survey of 
theoretical and institutional aspects of energy 
production, distribution, consumption, and 
regulation. Topics covered include cartel theo- 
ry, history of energy use, theory of resource 
exhaustion, models of energy demand and sup- 
ply, past and current policy issues, and envi- 
ronmental protection. Prerequisite: 467 and 
440, or consent of instructor. 
546-3 Workshop in Resource Economics. 
A research seminar on topics related to energy 
production, distribution, consumption, and 
regulation. Meetings will be divided among 
presentations of research of (a) faculty, (b) stu- 
dents, and (c) outside speakers, offered every 
semester. Maximum of three hours toward 
master's degree in economics. Prerequisite: 
545. 

552-3 Seminar in Economic Thought. An 
exploration of the basic philosophic assump- 
tions which underlie the various types of eco- 
nomic thought with special emphasis upon the 
historical development of the premises of mod- 
ern day economic theories. Prerequisite: 450a 
or b or consent of instructor. 
555-3 Seminar in Economic History. An 
examination of the structural economic 
changes in various economies throughout the 
world. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
562-3 Seminar in Economic Systems. A 
final, theoretically-oriented examination of ec- 
onomic systems. Includes recent theoretical 
models; contemporary changes in major eco- 
nomic systems; the emergence of mixed sys- 
tems. Relates economic, social, and political 
systems and evaluates attempts to place eco- 
nomic systems within the context of general 
systems theory. Prerequisite: 481 or consent of 
instructor. 

565-3 Applied Econometric Analysis. Ap- 
plications of statistical tools to specific eco- 
nomic problems. Numerous examples will be 
examined in order to achieve this goal. Em- 
phasis will be given to model misspecification, 
non-classical estimation techniques, data 
analysis, and simultaneous equations. Prereq- 
uisite: 467 or consent of instructor. 
566-3 Mathematical Economics II. Linear 
economic models. Linear programming. Input- 
output analysis and general equilibrium 
models. Prerequisite: 340, or 440, or 465, or 
consent of instructor. 

567-6 (3,3) Applied Econometrics I and II. 
(a) Linear regression analysis as applied to 
single equation economic models. Problems of 
least squares maximum likelihood, and as- 
ymptotic theory are introduced. Generalized 



least squares, lagged model, and qualitative 
dependent variables are analyzed. The em- 
phasis is on both theory and application, (b) A 
continuation of topics introduced in (a) with 
applications to various areas of economics. To 
be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: 467 or con- 
sent of instructor. 

570-3 Seminar in Contemporary Microe- 
conomic Theory. An investigation of recent 
developments and current controversies in ec- 
onomic theory with emphasis on microeco- 
nomic problems. Prerequisite: 540b. 
571-3 Seminar in Contemporary Macroe- 
conomic Theory. An investigation of recent 
developments and current controversies in ec- 
onomic theory with emphasis on macroeco- 
nomic problems. Prerequisite: 541b or consent 
of instructor. 

575-6 (3,3) Economic Theory I and II. (a) A 
rigorous treatment of the foundations of 
econometrics theory. Asymptotic theory is 
stressed. The single equation model is devel- 
oped, (b) Rigorous treatment of simultaneous 
equations systems including identification, 
limited information estimation, and full infor- 
mation. Properties of dynamic simultaneous 
equation models are developed. Inference is in- 
troduced into models which combine time se- 
ries and cross-sectional data. To be taken in 
sequence. Prerequisite: 567b. 
583-3 Methodological Foundations of 
Economics. A systematic analysis of the na- 
ture, philosophical content, premises, scope, 
boundaries, and characteristic methods of eco- 
nomics. The history of economic thought is 
drawn upon, but major focus is upon the con- 
temporary state of the discipline as well as 
upon apparent methodological trends. Prereq- 
uisite: 340 or 440, and 341, or 441, or consent of 
instructor. 

585-3 Seminar in Social Economy. In- 
terrelations between economic institutions and 
processes within the larger societal context. 
Applicable economic, political, and social 
theory, as well as empirical studies brought to 
bear. Prerequisite: 340, or 440, or consent of 
instructor. 

590-1 to 8 (1 per semester) Seminar in 
Contemporary Economics. Presentation 
and discussion of current research in econom- 
ics. One hour credit per semester. Graded S/ U 
only. 

598-1 to 3 Research Paper. Preparation of a 
research paper for a master's degree. Prereq- 
uisite: consent of instructor. 
599-1 to 6 Thesis. Minimum of four hours to 
be counted toward a master's degree. Graded 
S/U only. 

600-1 to 36 (1 to 16 per semester) Doctoral 
Dissertation. Hours and credit to be ar- 
ranged by director of graduate studies. Graded 
S/U only. 

601-1 per semester Continuing Enroll- 
ment. For those graduate students who have 
not finished their degree programs and who 
are in the process of working on their disserta- 
tion, thesis, or research paper. The student 
must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of 
dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, 
or research hours before being eligible to 



Course Descriptions 



Economics / 263 



register for this course. Concurrent enrollment 
in any other course is not permitted. Graded 
S/U or DEF only. 



Education 



400-1 to 4 Student Teaching. A require- 
ment in the undergraduate professional edu- 
cation sequence, 400 represents preliminary 
student teaching experiences necessary for 
certification by entitlement. For undergradu- 
ate students who are majoring in special edu- 
cation and are seeking entitlement to more 
than one teaching certification in the state of 
Illinois. Enrollment in this course must be ar- 
ranged through the Office of Teacher Educa- 
tion. For undergraduate credit only. Prerequi- 
site: admission to the Teacher Education 
Program, acceptance for student teaching, and 
concurrent enrollment in 312. 
401-1 to 12 Student Teaching. A require- 
ment in the undergraduate professional edu- 
cation sequence, 401 concludes the sequence of 
field experiences necessary for certification by 
entitlement. For undergraduate credit only. 
Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Educa- 
tion Program, acceptance for student teaching, 
and concurrent enrollment in 317. 
402-5 to 8 Student Teaching for Provi- 
sionally Certified Teachers. Offered for 
purposes of converting a provisional teaching 
certificate to a standard teaching certificate. 
The student teaching experie